When we refer to the term “Babylonian” or “Babylon,” we need to ask ourselves: just what does it all mean?
Also, what is a “pagan?” A
pagan, for simplicity sake, represents a follower of faiths or religions contrary to
the God of the Bible. The end result of these other religions often may lead one from, even in the opposite
moral direction of, that which is stated in the Bible (as we’ll see).
Many of us know of the Bible, the stories contained therein, and traditions surrounding it. What is the
difference between mythologies of ancient peoples in areas such as Babylon - those who may not have
followed the God of the Bible? What were the differences between the written works of pagan peoples who
may have lived alongside these early people of Genesis? Are there differences; are there similarities? Or, a
third option: could there be a good number of similarities between the two, but, due to the passage of time,
or (possibly) intentional manipulation, these once-historical accounts were turned into something diff-
erent?[1] As we read on, we’ll soon see the people who occupied the same land as Adam and Eve around
the same time lived in an area known as
The Land Between the Two Rivers. This land could also be called
Mesopotamia, Sumer, and Babylonia. For simplicity sake, we’ll identify this area by the name of Babylonia -
after the infamous city this website was named after.

Let’s look at
The Land Between the Two Rivers, the area between the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers (in
modern-day Iraq). This, as many believe, was the cradle of civilization. Many people, including a number
who believe in the Bible, also think of this as the land which housed the ancient Garden of Eden. No better
place for us to start our look into ancient pagan mythology than the stories of this ancient area - where the
Bible may have placed the early figures of Genesis: Adam, Eve, Cain, Abel, and the Serpent.
These early patriarchs and matriarchs, as we’ll see, were often associated with some city, and, more
importantly, some “god” of ancient Babylonia. Let’s take a quick look at a couple of the ancient cities of this
area. This will give us a good feel for who wrote some of the earliest mythologies of the time, as well as
motivations behind why they wrote things the way they did.
We’ve theorized, in
Adam & the pre-Adamites, there were more groups of people than just Adam and Eve in
the Garden. There were a number of different groups of these pre-Adamites, each with their own positions
of work in the Garden. As well, there were terrestrial angelic beings assigned to “manage” over them (a.k.a.
the Nephilim and Watchers) - with Adam at the helm. After Adam’s fall, Adam’s dominance over the workings
of the Garden was over. There were many people and fallen angels going in many different directions.
Ultimately, each person began leading their own unstructured, independent, life. Although many went their
own way, or in groups, it seemed obvious that most of them still retained a great deal of knowledge and
memories from their former life in the Garden.[2]











The people of one area in Babylonia,
Sumeria, were reportedly among the first in this land.[3] They were
located in the southern area of Babylonia.[4] Next, the
Semites were said to have come into the area. Could
these also be Adamites - renamed
Semite (after a son of Adam named Seth)?[5] Many scholars believe the
term
Semite describes a people after the flood of Noah (also the Israelites of the Bible), but it is possible
that there were Semites before the flood, as well (named after the patriarch Seth).[6]
Beyond the Sumerians and Semites, a third group of people who began to populate this area were known
as the
Akkadians.[7] A city associated with this land, Akkad, probably was named after a very famous
character of early Genesis (as we’ll see). These Semites and Akkadians were said to have come to this
area a little later on (as pagan mythology tells us), began to mix with these Sumerians, and shared
commonalities.[8] It isn’t too difficult to assume the core of all their origins - the Garden of Eden - would
come into play in much of their mythological lore:

One of the most amazing finds uncovered in Akkad was that of a seal which possibly shows that the
Akkadians knew of the story of the temptation of Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden. George Smith of
the British Museum, who lived during the middle 1800's, wrote: ‘One striking and important specimen of
early type in the British Museum has two figures sitting one on each side of a tree, holding out their
hands to the fruit, while at the back of one (the woman) is stretched a serpent.’
                                                                      ("Adam, the Flood & The Tower of Babel", n. d., p. 1)[9]










Some of the more famous cities of their day were
Eridu, Ur, Enoch, and, of course, Babylon.[10] Probably,
all of them were built, or at least ruled, by one important figure of early Genesis, as well; also of whom most
of us would know very well.[11] Beyond the city of Babylon, the city of Eridu is worth noting, here.
Eridu
could have been associated with the Biblical area of Eden.[12]

Eridu, the oldest city in Southern Mesopotamia… is the most likely place to have been Eden, the original
home for Adam and his kin.
                              ("In Search of the Historical Adam: Part 2", n. d., p. 1)[13]

Scary enough, as the ancients would branch out into other nations and empires, they maintained their
traditions and ways of life from the very beginning. A majority of religions, mythologies, and “ways of life”
of these succeeding peoples and empires were pagan; different in ways, yes, but seemingly united against
the God of the Bible. So, to help prove our point, we can take on the assumption that mythologies from
other nations and empires since Babylonia were, for the most part, in this same theological boat:

…Egypt, Chaldea, India, Greece and Rome passed torch of civilization from one to another… (they)
drew from a fountain higher than themselves.
                                           (Houston, 1926, p. 80)[14]

A lot of these myths are the same, in many ways - but (as we’ll see)
twisted. How was this all relevant to
Mystery Babylon? If we look at mythologies of each empire, they may allow us to pick up more, and more,
information about our mysterious past.
Mystery Babylon is a true mystery - with layers upon layers of
information that need to be either picked up, or peeled off, a little at a time. What is important to realize, at
this moment, is that most pagan mythological accounts from these empires probably came from the same
source, involved these same few individuals of Genesis, and, eventually, will lead the follower towards
some opposite theological pathway (if they are not careful)!
There is no one human being alive today who was alive back then, so, in reality,
nobody really knows what
happened for sure; and our modern scientific community, for the most part, seems to be united
against any
validity of the Holy Scriptures. So, what
do we have? How does one get an idea of what truly may have
occurred in these ancient times
- without taking in the automatically-skewed secular bias? All we have are
preserved ancient texts and oral traditions - pagan or otherwise. Our job is to weed through the mire of
information, and come up with some sort of a story - utilizing these pagan accounts, as well as Biblical.
Pagan morality obviously isn’t the ways of the Bible, and the individuals paganism turned into the focus of
their worship obviously were not of God’s design. So, we must account for that. For example: “… Judeo-
Christian tradition says that God is the measure of all things; the (ancient) Greek religious system stated
that man is the measure of all things.”[15] Man is not God, quite the contrary. God is God; man is just a
created being - as far from God as our planet is from the farthest star in the heavens. These “opposite”
extremes are because of manipulation, or “twists,” in the whole Genesis account, as well “twists” in the
ways God (and Adam) wanted for these early people.
Those who took on these opposing moral ideologies, ultimately, felt the need to eliminate the competition
in any way possible, which involved either changing history, or outright destroying the words of the Bible,
and God Himself. We shall see.
Babylonian Gods of Genesis
                                                  Copyright 2015, Brett T., All Rights Reserved.
        No content of this article or of mysterybabylon.com may be reproduced, duplicated, given away,
                  transmitted or resold in any form without prior written permission from the author.
                                                                                                     Footnotes
[1]  
Eusebius: Chronicle, 2, http://www.attalus.org/translate/eusebius.html (accessed May 5, 2011) ; Alexander Hislop, The Two Babylons
or the Papal Worship: Proved to be the Worship of Nimrod and His Wife
(Neptune, New Jersey: Loizeaux Brothers, 1916), 12; Mrs.
Sydney Bristowe,
Sargon the Magnificent (London: The Covenant Publishing Co., 1927), 103; Mrs. Sydney Bristowe, Sargon the
Magnificent
(London: The Covenant Publishing Co., 1927), 39.
[2]  Donald Mackenzie,
Myths of Babylonia and Assyria, (1915), 1.
[3]
 Nimrod: King of the World, 1, http://www.iwc.net/~levi/nimrod.htm (accessed June 2, 2000).
[4]
 Ancient Near East (Babylonia) Glossary and Texts, 4, http://www.piney.com/BabGloss.html (accessed June 21, 2013).
[5]  American Scientific Affiliation: Creation / Evolution Page,
In Search of the Historical Adam: Part 2, 8, http://www.asa3.
org/ASA/PSCF/1994/PSCF3-94Fischer.html (accessed April 12, 2005); Mrs. Sydney Bristowe,
Sargon the Magnificent (London: The
Covenant Publishing Co., 1927), 19.
[6]  Mrs. Sydney Bristowe,
Sargon the Magnificent (London: The Covenant Publishing Co., 1927), 19.
[7]  A. H. Sayce,
The Races of the Old Testament (London: The Religious Tract Society, 1891), 141; Ancient Near East (Babylonia)
Glossary and Texts
, 5, http://www.piney.com/BabGloss.html (accessed June 21, 2013).
[8]  Theophilus G. Pinches,
The Old Testament: In The Light of The Historical Records and Legends of Assyria and Babylonia (Brighton:
Society For Promoting Christian Knowledge, 1903), 125; Donald Mackenzie,
Myths of Babylonia and Assyria, (1915), 12; Donald
Mackenzie,
Myths of Babylonia and Assyria, (1915), 13; A. H. Sayce, The Races of the Old Testament (London: The Religious Tract
Society, 1891), 141;
Nimrod: King of the World, 1, http://www.iwc.net/~levi/nimrod.htm (accessed June 2, 2000).
[9]
 Adam, the Flood & The Tower of Babel, 1, http://www.biblehistory.net/newsletter/tower_of_babel.htm (accessed May 10, 2011).
[10]
 Ancient Near East (Babylonia) Glossary and Texts, 20, http://www.piney.com/BabGloss.html (accessed June 21, 2013); Drusilla
Dunjee Houston,
Wonderful Ethiopians of the Ancient Cushite Empire (1926), 160; Ancient Near East (Babylonia) Glossary and Texts,
49, http://www.piney.com/BabGloss.html (accessed June 21, 2013); Theophilus G. Pinches,
The Old Testament: In The Light of The
Historical Records and Legends of Assyria and Babylonia
(Brighton: Society For Promoting Christian Knowledge, 1903), 124; Ancient
Near East (Babylonia) Glossary and Texts
, 9, http://www.piney.com/BabGloss.html (accessed June 21, 2013).
[11]  American Scientific Affiliation: Creation / Evolution Page,
In Search of the Historical Adam: Part 2, 1, http://www.asa3.
org/ASA/PSCF/1994/PSCF3-94Fischer.html (accessed April 12, 2005 320); E. S. G. Bristowe,
Cain - An Argument (Leicester: Edgar
Backus, 1950), 14, 24.
[12]  American Scientific Affiliation: Creation / Evolution Page,
In Search of the Historical Adam: Part 2, 1, http://www.asa3.
org/ASA/PSCF/1994/PSCF3-94Fischer.html (accessed April 12, 2005 320).
[13]  American Scientific Affiliation: Creation / Evolution Page,
In Search of the Historical Adam: Part 2, 1, http://www.asa3.
org/ASA/PSCF/1994/PSCF3-94Fischer.html (accessed April 12, 2005 320).
[14]  Drusilla Dunjee Houston,
Wonderful Ethiopians of the Ancient Cushite Empire (1926), 80.
[15]  Robert Bowie Johnson, Jr.,
The Parthenon Code: Mankind’s History in Marble (Annapolis, Maryland: Solving Light Books, 2004),
26.
[16]  Mrs. Sydney Bristowe,
Sargon the Magnificent (London: The Covenant Publishing Co., 1927), 20.
[17]  Mrs. Sydney Bristowe,
Sargon the Magnificent (London: The Covenant Publishing Co., 1927), 49.
[18[  Mrs. Sydney Bristowe,
Sargon the Magnificent (London: The Covenant Publishing Co., 1927), 14.
[19]  Robert Bowie Johnson, Jr.,
The Parthenon Code: Mankind’s History in Marble (Annapolis, Maryland: Solving Light Books, 2004),
7.
[20]  Philip Gardiner,
Secrets of the Serpent: in Search of the Secret Past (Foresthill Ca.: Reality press, 2006), 10.
[21]
 The Babylonian Legends of the Creation and the Fight Between Bel and the Dragon As Told by Assyrian Tablets from Nineveh
(London: Harrison & Sons, 1931), 31.
[22]  Bertrand L. Comparet, What Happened to Cain, 24, http://www.posse-comitatus.org/Bible_Studies/what_happened_to_cain.htm
(accessed Aug. 21, 2000 334).
[23]  Bertrand L. Comparet, What Happened to Cain, 24, http://www.posse-comitatus.org/Bible_Studies/what_happened_to_cain.htm
(accessed Aug. 21, 2000 334).
[24]  Robert Bowie Johnson, Jr.,
The Parthenon Code: Mankind’s History in Marble (Annapolis, Maryland: Solving Light Books, 2004),
9.
[25]  Robert Bowie Johnson, Jr.,
The Parthenon Code: Mankind’s History in Marble (Annapolis, Maryland: Solving Light Books, 2004),
26.
[26]  Robert Bowie Johnson, Jr.,
The Parthenon Code: Mankind’s History in Marble (Annapolis, Maryland: Solving Light Books, 2004),
258.
[27]
 Ancient Near East (Babylonia) Glossary and Texts, 35, http://www.piney.com/BabGloss.html (accessed June 21, 2013).
[28]  George Smith,
The Chaldean Account of the Deluge, 6.
[29]  Donald Mackenzie,
Myths of Babylonia and Assyria, (1915), 28.
[30]  G. H. Pember, M. A.,
Earth’s Earliest Ages and their Connection With Modern Spiritualism, Theosophy, and Buddhism (Grand
Rapids, Michigan: Kregel Publications, 1975), 27.
[31]  Albert T. Clay,
The Origin of Biblical Traditions: Hebrew Legends in Babylonia and Israel (New Haven: Yale University Press, )
91-92.
[32]  G. H. Pember, M. A.,
Earth’s Earliest Ages and their Connection With Modern Spiritualism, Theosophy, and Buddhism (Grand
Rapids, Michigan: Kregel Publications, 1975), 27; Albert T. Clay,
The Origin of Biblical Traditions: Hebrew Legends in Babylonia and
Israel
(New Haven: Yale University Press, ) 70, 216; Alfred Jeremias, The Old Testament in the Light of the Ancient East Vol. I (New
York: G. P. Putnam’s Sons, 1911), 5.
[33]
 Ancient Near East (Babylonia) Glossary and Texts, 2, http://www.piney.com/BabGloss.html (accessed June 21, 2013).
[34]
 The difference between Hades, Shoel, TarTarum, Hell?, 1, http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20081125101656AAL4zku
(accessed Aug. 12, 2013).
[35]  Stephen Charles Bandy,
Caines Cynn: A Study of Beuwolf and the Legends of Cain (Stephen Charles Bandy, 1967), 47.
[36]  Stephen Charles Bandy,
Caines Cynn: A Study of Beuwolf and the Legends of Cain (Stephen Charles Bandy, 1967), 44.
[37]
 The difference between Hades, Shoel, TarTarum, Hell?, 1, http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20081125101656AAL4
zku (accessed Aug. 12, 2013).
[38]  Stephen Charles Bandy,
Caines Cynn: A Study of Beuwolf and the Legends of Cain (Stephen Charles Bandy, 1967), 45.
[39]  Anonymous,
New Interpretation of a Portion of the Third Chapter of Genesis, Viewed in Connection With Other Parts of the Bible;
Including an Inquiry Into the Introduction, Nature, and Extent of Satanic Influence in the World
(London, J. Hatchard and Son, 1834),
73.
[40]  Stephen Charles Bandy,
Caines Cynn: A Study of Beuwolf and the Legends of Cain (Stephen Charles Bandy, 1967), 127.
[41]  Robert William Rogers,
Cuneiform Parallels to the Old Testament (New York: Jennings & Graham, 1912), 48.
[42]  Robert Bowie Johnson, Jr.,
The Parthenon Code: Mankind’s History in Marble (Annapolis, Maryland: Solving Light Books, 2004),
202.
[43]  E. S. G. Bristowe,
Cain - An Argument (Leicester: Edgar Backus, 1950), 41.
[44]  Howard B. Rand,
Study in Daniel (Merrimac, Massachusetts: Destiny Publishers, 1948), 396.
[45]  Drusilla Dunjee Houston,
Wonderful Ethiopians of the Ancient Cushite Empire (1926), 195.
[46]  Robert William Rogers,
Cuneiform Parallels to the Old Testament (New York: Jennings & Graham, 1912), 32.
[47]  Robert Bowie Johnson, Jr.,
The Parthenon Code: Mankind’s History in Marble (Annapolis, Maryland: Solving Light Books, 2004),
10.
[48]  Mrs. Sydney Bristowe,
Sargon the Magnificent (London: The Covenant Publishing Co., 1927), 126
[49]  Robert Bowie Johnson, Jr.,
The Parthenon Code: Mankind’s History in Marble (Annapolis, Maryland: Solving Light Books, 2004),
11.
[50]  Robert Bowie Johnson, Jr.,
The Parthenon Code: Mankind’s History in Marble (Annapolis, Maryland: Solving Light Books, 2004),
11.

We already know who the first couple was, according to the Bible. Let’s take a look at the more popular,
and probable, ancient pagan equivalents for the first Biblical character of Genesis: Adam (as well as others)!

                                                                                  - - -

For more information on the above section, please browse our selection of
Mystery Babylon books (especially
The Rise of Mystery Babylon - The Tower of Babel (Part 1)”!
The Underworld

Beyond the water which may have covered the earth at this time, one needs to go deeper, and look inside
our earth - deep down, beneath the earth’s surface. Was there only rock down there, or could there had
been something of a supernatural significance down there, as well? The word
abyss comes from words that
can mean "bottomless" or "chaos."[33] Most of us have heard of the underworld. The pagan
Hades and
Jewish
Sheol both seem to represent a similar concept; one Greek, the other, Hebrew.[34]

It is especially important to note the close connection of the underworld with the sea, a perfectly
understandable conjunction, for the dark, unseen recesses of the ocean bottom are likely apertures to
Hades, if not the place itself.
                                                                   (Bandy, 1967, p. 47)[35]

(Sheol was…) essentially a place where men were treated according to their deserts, with a division for
the righteous, and a division for the wicked.
                                           (Bandy, 1967, p. 44)[36]

The two, essentially, are almost the same - a "common grave of mankind."[37] For the most part, they, both,
were said to be located in the center of the earth.[38] We’ve also elaborated on this in the
Gap Theory. God
may have destroyed our previous world. Then, He placed the souls of this devastated world into the “holding
area” or “common grave” of the abyss; only to have them come back again, as newborn babes, into our
present world.

…when God imparts the living soul to man, he commits a pre-existent spirit to an existence in the flesh.
                                                                                                (Anonymous, 1834, p. 73)[39]

This is not reincarnation (see
Creation - the Gap & Deep), but a different way to look at our human exis-
tence. Pagan theology may hold to the existence of a similar “holding cell,” prison, or underworld for lost
souls, as well. Some ancient sources even referred to this area by the same name as used in Biblical
tradition! One author describes it as follows: deep beneath the earth, in the deepest depths of this
supernatural “sea,” beyond the Abyss, beneath Sheol, is located this area of
Darkness (“which is also
called the bottomless
Deep”).[40] In ancient Babylonian myths and texts, we have:

Bilingual of Creation
8 The Deep had not been made…
10 All lands were sea.[41]

(The historian) Hesoid’s account of creation… begins with Chaos itself, out of which emerged…
Darkness.
                                                                              (Johnson, 2004, p. 202)[42]

There were even gods and goddesses who were associated with this
Deep. The pagan goddess Ishtar,
for example, was known as "Lady of the Deep."[43] Why?

Darkness has been used symbolically of degradation and evil, but that there is an actual place of
darkness where evil spirits are compelled to reside…
                       (Rand, 1948, p. 396)[44]

It’s fairly easy to begin to assume the pagan
Darkness or Deep was, most probably, similar to this
spiritual/supernatural realm of Biblical tradition.

In Babylonian stories, there was sad mixture of animal forms as well as of land and atmosphere, until
some sort of divine wisdom incarnated in a certain god(s) brought order to it all.
                                                                                             (Houston, 1926, 195)[45]

While we’re on this subject, we now need to let the “cat out of the bag,” and discover who the pagan lore
attributed to their “divine wisdom incarnated into a certain god” really was. In reality, it was probably the
Cain of Genesis who was given credit for bringing order out of Chaos - the chaos which was once the old
world! It was Cain who was also given credit for having authority over this
Deep:

The Story of Creation
142 He set himself over against the Deep…
143 And the lord measured the construction of the Deep…[46]

It was Cain, as well, who was given credit for having such wisdom that he put together the pagan religion,
and established who the gods and goddesses of this religion should be!
Cain was also credited for having control over life and death, and over most all the natural and super-
natural elements above, and deep below, our earth. Again, all of this was nothing but a twisted version of
the awesome powers of God over the planet (now transplanted into, none other than, the son of the
Serpent)! Why would pagan thought give so much credit to this man? Why would the ancient Greeks, so
often, exert that
man was the measure of all things, not God? Why would these ancient Greeks, as well as
other ancient writers, often picture their gods and goddesses as human in appearance?[47] This question
is probably skewed towards the obvious: they once
were! Maybe these ancient gods and goddesses
represented famous Greek ancestors - their most ancient and famous relatives of old! Of course, Cain
would fit into this role to a tee: he was a child of Eve. You can’t go much farther back in ancestry than that.
This same practice of ancestor worship was popular in most succeeding empires of the ancients, beginning
in these early days of ancient Babylonia. Seems that most of the information God wanted for Adam, Eve,
and the people of the era was taken over by Cain and his posse, and ‘twisted:’

…those laws were founded upon the original rules of conduct given to Adam… were taken by Cain into
Babylonia and there remodeled to suit his purposes…
                             (Bristowe, 1927, p. 126)[48]

Ancestor Worship

Ancestor worship was, and still is, the staple of ancient pagan religion, and functions as the foundation of
their god and goddess worship. The next, natural question which may arise might be: could the famous
pagan ancestors that were, indeed, turned into gods be the same as the famous ancestors of early
Genesis (i.e. Adam, Eve, Abel, Cain, etc.)? We will see that, over time, the worship of the original Genesis
characters probably
did morph its way into a sophisticated form of ancestor worship - at least as far as
paganism is concerned; and, thanks to Cain, they were turned into the first polytheistic “gods.”[49]
For the sake of understanding, let’s try to proceed with the assumption that the following pagan gods and
goddess to be detailed were the ancient matriarchs and patriarchs of Genesis. By looking at the details of
these gods, while maintaining this mindset, we should easily be able to piece together some solid simil-
arities! At least, the probability will come to mind that there has to be something to it all.
The more we read, the more things will come to light. If we take on the assumption these pagan gods
could very well be Biblical characters, we’ll get a grasp at how the real story probably went. As well, we’ll
see how Cain was given the credit for elevating those close to him into “gods.” This included Adam, his
mother Eve, and none other than his probable father - the Serpent of the Garden of Eden! Let’s continue
with a number of the most popular gods of ancient Babylonia, and compare them to early Biblical
personalities. We need to start at the very beginning, because:

                                                The first couple advances to the forefront of gods…
                                                                                         (Johnson, 2004, p. 11)[50]
A Confusing Mythology of Old?

If we look at most of the pagan or secular-leaning mythologies of today, most seem to be a conglomerate of
unrelated, insensible accounts. These scattered piece works of gods and goddesses often appear to be
strewn together in any old way. Most see our modern mythology books as a collection of discombobulated,
spotted information, at best: god “A” mates with goddess “B”; god “C” kills goddess “D”; god “E” eats his
own children, etc. Why is it this way? In this website, we will try to put much of it together, and explain it in
such a way so that the reader can actually make sense of some of it; also, to show how much of it might
actually relate to the Bible! Even if these two sides (the pagan and the Biblical) might take the reader
towards an opposite moral or religious direction, that doesn’t mean they both didn’t come from the same
source!

…the knowledge imparted to man in the beginning has come down in two streams, on one hand through
the Hebrews, and on the other through the Babylonians.
                               (Bristowe, 1927, p. 20)[16]

Those who insist on saying “all religions are the same” are most probably correct… almost. There are still
others who say, “the faiths of the world all point towards God; it’s just a God in many different forms."
Again, they are probably correct… almost. It seems that most religious theologies do point towards one
god, but, as we’ll see, it’s not the God of the Bible. When we look at what the Bible really has to say and
compare it to what the rest of the many pagan-influenced beliefs really have to say, we will see how the
morality which stems from the Bible is in a class all by itself. How, then, did paganism spread so easily -
one might ask? Who was responsible for so much of its development? We will see now; the cat is now
“out of the bag.”
Yes, it was the
Cain of Genesis who was probably responsible for building a number of ancient Babylonian
cities, as well as ruling over them. Cain did a lot to spread the ancient religious beliefs of paganism to
others around him. He helped to develop polytheism in the pre-flood world, and bring these new ideals to
the masses. There were two “ways,” or “cultures,” which began to take hold after the Fall of Adam: one
stemmed from the people who followed the ways of God (via Adam); the other the people who followed
the “ways” of Cain:[17]

Two of the most recent writers upon the Babylonian inscriptions unintentionally support Professor Kittel's
opinion that the Genesis stories came down in ‘two streams,’ and also my theory that one stream came
down through the descendants of Seth (via Adam) and the other through Cain in Babylonia (via the
Serpent).
                                                                                          (Bristowe, 1927, p. 14)[18]

If so many people began to adopt the pagan “ways” of Cain, it leads one to wonder: why did so many
people easily turn away from the God of the Bible? Was Adam that hard of a leader to work under? Again,
we know Cain was the “son of perdition,” and we know who Cain’s real father probably was:
the Serpent.
This Serpent was against Adam, God, and the Bible from the beginning. God stated that there would be
enmity between the seeds of Adam and seeds of the Serpent! Cain was not only the Serpent’s son, but, as
we’ll see, he became his partner! The Serpent had many followers, even had descendants, by the time of
Cain’s death. A vast majority of them began to follow the “ways of Cain;” that’s why there was so much
dissension against Adam, and the ways of God, early on.
We mustn’t forget the motivations behind most of these ancient pagan writers: most of the “meat” behind
their works actually came from the inspirations of fallen, terrestrial angels, of Cain, and, of course, the
Serpent himself. Similar to those who follow the Bible, it’s pretty obvious those who wrote with a pagan
slant probably wanted to promote their writings with their own best interests in mind.
It is notable to discover how early Greek poets and artists, for example, probably told the same stories as in
early Genesis, only from an opposite viewpoint![19] If we look at the Garden of Eden story, for example, a
typical Greek account would conclude that the Serpent did not seduce Adam and Eve, and help sentence
them to an unenlightened state; but, in quite the opposite moral extreme - he enlightened them!

(An early group of Gnostics would)… attribute all wisdom to the serpent of Paradise, and say that he
was the author of knowledge of men.
                                                        (Gardiner, 2006, p. 10)[20]

Cain was also said to have set up priests, in the Babylonian city of Ur, to administrate his new religion.
Again, this led the opportunity for these historical accounts to be further manipulated. The acceptance
of what was “politically correct” in those days often was confined entirely to these early scribes and
priests.[21] These priests were well able to muddle things somewhat in their legends, if need be.[22]
They wanted it all to fit in with their own interpretation on what they believed it all
should be. By the time
the priests got through with the real stories of the Bible, they were turned into a “garbled, yet still some-
what recognizable form of early Genesis.”[23] Even though these stories were, obviously, changed around,
and even though they may try to bring the reader towards some opposing moral conclusion, they can
provide a good deal of substance for our discussion of
Mystery Babylon. Why?

Though, on one hand, Greek idol-worship contradicts the teaching of the Word of God, on the other, if
properly understood, it reinforces the truth of the Scriptures.
                      (Johnson, 2004, p. 9)[24]

As we progress, we will notice a number of similarities between these pagan mythological stories and the
Bible, at least in ways it can pertain to this website. Once we understand the (most probable) identity of
these pagan ancestral gods and goddesses (as well as their motivations) it helps us to learn a great deal
more about these early characters of Genesis than we’ve ever known.[25] One thing we may need to do is
to read these mythological accounts with the knowledge that they will probably try to promote an opposite
moral viewpoint to the reader, and to overlook this. Once we keep this protocol in mind, the similarities
they have to the Bible will almost become crystal clear. It will be amazing to see how pagan/Babylonian
mythologies could actually reinforce and strengthen the Bible, and Biblical traditions, in so many ways.

What the Greeks meant to be an unparalleled, intricately chiseled monument to the glory of mankind
turns out to be a detailed history of mankin’d delusion, and a clear-cut validation of the truth of the Word
of God.
                                                                                             (Johnson, 2004, p. 258)[26]

Moving forward, we’ve already understood, from
Creation - the Gap & Deep, some of the more “Biblical”
concepts of the
Gap Theory, the Darkness, and Deep. Believe it or not, if we look deeper into these
pagan mythologies, we discover much of the same; and can learn more about these topics than we may
have ever dreamed. Let’s take a look at the pagan view of these above concepts, from their own
mythological accounts or perspectives.[27]

The Chaldean Account of the Deluge
116 …‘I have begotten man and let him not
117 like the sons of the fishes fill the sea.’[28]

In
Creation - the Gap & Deep, we’ve understood how water had a great deal of significance throughout our
ancient world: water was used to destroy the world before Adam; it almost destroyed the world of Noah’s
day, etc. Water is necessary for life. Our bodies (and our brains) are, as well, made up mostly of water.
Some of these significances also seem to pass into the supernatural (or spiritual) realm!
In regards to the above topics, these other supernatural characteristics need to be accounted for, as well;
first, in Biblical tradition, now in pagan mythology. It seems the ancients, whatever their religious leaning,
had full knowledge of the supernatural significances of water, and inserted them into their own mythological
stories and histories.

The idea is that ‘where a god dies, that is, ceases to exist in human form, his life passes into the waters
where he is buried; and this again is merely a theory to bring the divine water or the divine fish into
harmony with anthropomorphic ideas. The same thing was sometimes effected in another way by saying
that the anthropomorphic deity was born from the water, as Aphrodite sprang from sea foam…’
                                                                                                  (Mackenzie, 1915, p. 28)[29]

Along the same line, we know (from
Creation - the Gap & Deep) there can also be a spiritual “sea” - an
infinite, supernatural “sea” of space within our own, natural world, beyond your everyday sea of water.
Simply put, when the ancients talked about the “sea,” or something related to “water,” the chances may be
good that they often could be referring to something in the supernatural, or spiritual, world. Let’s begin to
look at how pagan mythologies could have utilized these same ideals.
First, the ancient pagan historian Hesoid stated that the early world was in “… Chaos, an unformed and
confused bulk.”[30] Speaking of this
chaos, we know that the world before Adam, in the Bible, was also a
watery
chaos - a time of utter destruction and ruin. It’s interesting to know that “just as in the Creation
story of the Bible, the Babylonian ‘creator’ also caused dry land to appear, and brought the world back from
a watery chaos.”[31] Ancient Greek and Roman mythology also stated much of the same thing: the
universe sprang from Chaos.[32] We’ll soon see that, according to pagan mythology, something with
supernatural might was responsible for bringing our world to this state of chaos.