When we refer to the term “Babylonian” or “Babylon,” we need to ask ourselves: just what does it all mean?
Also, what is a “pagan?” A
pagan, for simplicity sake, represents a follower of faiths or religions contrary to
the God of the Bible. The end result of these other religions often may lead one from, even in the opposite
moral direction of, that which is stated in the Bible (as we’ll see).
Many of us know of the Bible, the stories contained therein, and traditions surrounding it. What is the
difference between mythologies of ancient peoples in areas such as Babylon – those who may not have
followed the God of the Bible? What were the differences between the written works of pagan peoples who
may have lived alongside these early people of Genesis? Are there differences; are there similarities? Or, a
third option: could there be a good number of similarities between the two, but, due to the passage of time,
or (possibly) intentional manipulation, these once-historical accounts were turned into something diff-
erent?[1] As we read on, we’ll soon see the people who occupied the same land as Adam and Eve around
the same time lived in an area known as
The Land Between the Two Rivers. This land could also be called
Mesopotamia, Sumer, and Babylonia. For simplicity sake, we’ll identify this area by the name of Babylonia –
after the infamous city this website was named after.

Let’s look at
The Land Between the Two Rivers, the area between the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers (in
modern-day Iraq). This, as many believe, was the cradle of civilization. Many people, including a number
who believe in the Bible, also think of this as the land which housed the ancient Garden of Eden. No better
place for us to start our look into ancient pagan mythology than the stories of this ancient area - where the
Bible may have placed the early figures of Genesis: Adam, Eve, Cain, Abel, and the Serpent.
These early patriarchs and matriarchs, as we’ll see, were often associated with some city, and, more
importantly, some “god” of ancient Babylonia. Let’s take a quick look at a couple of the ancient cities of this
area. This will give us a good feel for who wrote some of the earliest mythologies of the time, as well as
motivations behind why they wrote things the way they did.
We’ve theorized, in
Adam & the pre-Adamites, there were more groups of people than just Adam and Eve in
the Garden. There were a number of different groups of these pre-Adamites, each with their own positions
of work in the Garden. As well, there were terrestrial angelic beings assigned to “manage” over them (a.k.a.
the Nephilim and Watchers) – with Adam at the helm. After Adam’s fall, Adam’s dominance over the workings
of the Garden was over. There were many people and fallen angels going in many different directions.
Ultimately, each person began leading their own unstructured, independent, life. Although many went their
own way, or in groups, it seemed obvious that most of them still retained a great deal of knowledge and
memories from their former life in the Garden.[2]











The people of one area in Babylonia,
Sumeria, were reportedly among the first in this land.[3] They were
located in the southern area of Babylonia.[4] Next, the
Semites were said to have come into the area. Could
these also be Adamites – renamed
Semite (after a son of Adam named Seth)?[5] Many scholars believe the
term
Semite describes a people after the flood of Noah (also the Israelites of the Bible), but it is possible
that there were Semites before the flood, as well (named after the patriarch Seth).[6]
Beyond the Sumerians and Semites, a third group of people who began to populate this area were known
as the
Akkadians.[7] A city associated with this land, Akkad, probably was named after a very famous
character of early Genesis (as we’ll see). These Semites and Akkadians were said to have come to this
area a little later on (as pagan mythology tells us), began to mix with these Sumerians, and shared
commonalities.[8] It isn’t too difficult to assume the core of all their origins – the Garden of Eden – would
come into play in much of their mythological lore:

One of the most amazing finds uncovered in Akkad was that of a seal which possibly shows that the
Akkadians knew of the story of the temptation of Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden. George Smith of
the British Museum, who lived during the middle 1800's, wrote: ‘One striking and important specimen of
early type in the British Museum has two figures sitting one on each side of a tree, holding out their
hands to the fruit, while at the back of one (the woman) is stretched a serpent.’
                                                 ("Adam, the Flood & The Tower of Babel", n. d., p. 1)[9]










Some of the more famous cities of their day were
Eridu, Ur, Enoch, and, of course, Babylon.[10] Probably,
all of them were built, or at least ruled, by one important figure of early Genesis, as well; also of whom most
of us would know very well.[11] Beyond the city of Babylon, the city of Eridu is worth noting, here.
Eridu
could have been associated with the Biblical area of Eden.[12]

Eridu, the oldest city in Southern Mesopotamia… is the most likely place to have been Eden, the original
home for Adam and his kin.
                             ("In Search of the Historical Adam: Part 2", n. d., p. 1)[13]

Scary enough, as the ancients would branch out into other nations and empires, they maintained their
traditions and ways of life from the very beginning. A majority of religions, mythologies, and “ways of life”
of these succeeding peoples and empires were pagan; different in ways, yes, but seemingly united against
the God of the Bible. So, to help prove our point, we can take on the assumption that mythologies from
other nations and empires since Babylonia were, for the most part, in this same theological boat:

…Egypt, Chaldea, India, Greece and Rome passed torch of civilization from one to another… (they)
drew from a fountain higher than themselves.
                                          (Houston, 1926, p. 80)[14]

A lot of these myths are the same, in many ways – but (as we’ll see)
twisted. How was this all relevant to
Mystery Babylon? If we look at mythologies of each empire, they may allow us to pick up more, and more,
information about our mysterious past.
Mystery Babylon is a true mystery – with layers upon layers of
information that need to be either picked up, or peeled off, a little at a time. What is important to realize, at
this moment, is that most pagan mythological accounts from these empires probably came from the same
source, involved these same few individuals of Genesis, and, eventually, will lead the follower towards
some opposite theological pathway (if they are not careful)!
There is no one human being alive today who was alive back then, so, in reality,
nobody really knows what
happened for sure; and our modern scientific community, for the most part, seems to be united
against any
validity of the Holy Scriptures. So, what
do we have? How does one get an idea of what truly may have
occurred in these ancient times
- without taking in the automatically-skewed secular bias? All we have are
preserved ancient texts and oral traditions - pagan or otherwise. Our job is to weed through the mire of
information, and come up with some sort of a story - utilizing these pagan accounts, as well as Biblical.
Pagan morality obviously isn’t the ways of the Bible, and the individuals paganism turned into the focus of
their worship obviously were not of God’s design. So, we must account for that. For example: “… Judeo-
Christian tradition says that God is the measure of all things; the (ancient) Greek religious system stated
that man is the measure of all things.”[15] Man is not God, quite the contrary. God is God; man is just a
created being - as far from God as our planet is from the farthest star in the heavens. These “opposite”
extremes are because of manipulation, or “twists,” in the whole Genesis account, as well “twists” in the
ways God (and Adam) wanted for these early people.
Those who took on these opposing moral ideologies, ultimately, felt the need to eliminate the competition
in any way possible, which involved either changing history, or outright destroying the words of the Bible,
and God Himself. We shall see.
Babylonian Gods of Genesis
                                                   Copyright 2015, Brett T., All Rights Reserved.
 
        No content of this article or of mysterybabylon.com may be reproduced, duplicated, given away,
  
                 transmitted or resold in any form without prior written permission from the author.
                                                                                                      Footnotes
[1]  
Eusebius: Chronicle, 2, http://www.attalus.org/translate/eusebius.html (accessed May 5, 2011) ; Alexander Hislop, The Two Babylons
or the Papal Worship: Proved to be the Worship of Nimrod and His Wife
(Neptune, New Jersey: Loizeaux Brothers, 1916), 12; Mrs.
Sydney Bristowe,
Sargon the Magnificent (London: The Covenant Publishing Co., 1927), 103; Mrs. Sydney Bristowe, Sargon the
Magnificent
(London: The Covenant Publishing Co., 1927), 39.
[2]  Donald Mackenzie,
Myths of Babylonia and Assyria, (1915), 1.
[3]
 Nimrod: King of the World, 1, http://www.iwc.net/~levi/nimrod.htm (accessed June 2, 2000).
[4]
 Ancient Near East (Babylonia) Glossary and Texts, 4, http://www.piney.com/BabGloss.html (accessed June 21, 2013).
[5]  American Scientific Affiliation: Creation / Evolution Page,
In Search of the Historical Adam: Part 2, 8, http://www.asa3.
org/ASA/PSCF/1994/PSCF3-94Fischer.html (accessed April 12, 2005); Mrs. Sydney Bristowe,
Sargon the Magnificent (London: The
Covenant Publishing Co., 1927), 19.
[6]  Mrs. Sydney Bristowe,
Sargon the Magnificent (London: The Covenant Publishing Co., 1927), 19.
[7]  A. H. Sayce,
The Races of the Old Testament (London: The Religious Tract Society, 1891), 141; Ancient Near East (Babylonia)
Glossary and Texts
, 5, http://www.piney.com/BabGloss.html (accessed June 21, 2013).
[8]  Theophilus G. Pinches,
The Old Testament: In The Light of The Historical Records and Legends of Assyria and Babylonia (Brighton:
Society For Promoting Christian Knowledge, 1903), 125; Donald Mackenzie,
Myths of Babylonia and Assyria, (1915), 12; Donald
Mackenzie,
Myths of Babylonia and Assyria, (1915), 13; A. H. Sayce, The Races of the Old Testament (London: The Religious Tract
Society, 1891), 141;
Nimrod: King of the World, 1, http://www.iwc.net/~levi/nimrod.htm (accessed June 2, 2000).
[9]
 Adam, the Flood & The Tower of Babel, 1, http://www.biblehistory.net/newsletter/tower_of_babel.htm (accessed May 10, 2011).
[10]
 Ancient Near East (Babylonia) Glossary and Texts, 20, http://www.piney.com/BabGloss.html (accessed June 21, 2013); Drusilla
Dunjee Houston,
Wonderful Ethiopians of the Ancient Cushite Empire (1926), 160; Ancient Near East (Babylonia) Glossary and Texts,
49, http://www.piney.com/BabGloss.html (accessed June 21, 2013); Theophilus G. Pinches,
The Old Testament: In The Light of The
Historical Records and Legends of Assyria and Babylonia
(Brighton: Society For Promoting Christian Knowledge, 1903), 124; Ancient
Near East (Babylonia) Glossary and Texts
, 9, http://www.piney.com/BabGloss.html (accessed June 21, 2013).
[11]  American Scientific Affiliation: Creation / Evolution Page,
In Search of the Historical Adam: Part 2, 1, http://www.asa3.
org/ASA/PSCF/1994/PSCF3-94Fischer.html (accessed April 12, 2005 320); E. S. G. Bristowe,
Cain - An Argument (Leicester: Edgar
Backus, 1950), 14, 24.
[12]  American Scientific Affiliation: Creation / Evolution Page,
In Search of the Historical Adam: Part 2, 1, http://www.asa3.
org/ASA/PSCF/1994/PSCF3-94Fischer.html (accessed April 12, 2005 320).
[13]  American Scientific Affiliation: Creation / Evolution Page,
In Search of the Historical Adam: Part 2, 1, http://www.asa3.
org/ASA/PSCF/1994/PSCF3-94Fischer.html (accessed April 12, 2005 320).
[14]  Drusilla Dunjee Houston,
Wonderful Ethiopians of the Ancient Cushite Empire (1926), 80.
[15]  Robert Bowie Johnson, Jr.,
The Parthenon Code: Mankind’s History in Marble (Annapolis, Maryland: Solving Light Books, 2004),
26.
[16]  Mrs. Sydney Bristowe,
Sargon the Magnificent (London: The Covenant Publishing Co., 1927), 20.
[17]  Mrs. Sydney Bristowe,
Sargon the Magnificent (London: The Covenant Publishing Co., 1927), 49.
[18[  Mrs. Sydney Bristowe,
Sargon the Magnificent (London: The Covenant Publishing Co., 1927), 14.
[19]  Robert Bowie Johnson, Jr.,
The Parthenon Code: Mankind’s History in Marble (Annapolis, Maryland: Solving Light Books, 2004),
7.
[20]  Philip Gardiner,
Secrets of the Serpent: in Search of the Secret Past (Foresthill Ca.: Reality press, 2006), 10.
[21]
 The Babylonian Legends of the Creation and the Fight Between Bel and the Dragon As Told by Assyrian Tablets from Nineveh
(London: Harrison & Sons, 1931), 31.
[22]  Bertrand L. Comparet, What Happened to Cain, 24, http://www.posse-comitatus.org/Bible_Studies/what_happened_to_cain.htm
(accessed Aug. 21, 2000 334).
[23]  Bertrand L. Comparet, What Happened to Cain, 24, http://www.posse-comitatus.org/Bible_Studies/what_happened_to_cain.htm
(accessed Aug. 21, 2000 334).
[24]  Robert Bowie Johnson, Jr.,
The Parthenon Code: Mankind’s History in Marble (Annapolis, Maryland: Solving Light Books, 2004),
9.
[25]  Robert Bowie Johnson, Jr.,
The Parthenon Code: Mankind’s History in Marble (Annapolis, Maryland: Solving Light Books, 2004),
26.
[26]  Robert Bowie Johnson, Jr.,
The Parthenon Code: Mankind’s History in Marble (Annapolis, Maryland: Solving Light Books, 2004),
258.
[27]
 Ancient Near East (Babylonia) Glossary and Texts, 35, http://www.piney.com/BabGloss.html (accessed June 21, 2013).
[28]  George Smith,
The Chaldean Account of the Deluge, 6.
[29]  Donald Mackenzie,
Myths of Babylonia and Assyria, (1915), 28.
[30]  G. H. Pember, M. A.,
Earth’s Earliest Ages and their Connection With Modern Spiritualism, Theosophy, and Buddhism (Grand
Rapids, Michigan: Kregel Publications, 1975), 27.
[31]  Albert T. Clay,
The Origin of Biblical Traditions: Hebrew Legends in Babylonia and Israel (New Haven: Yale University Press, )
91-92.
[32]  G. H. Pember, M. A.,
Earth’s Earliest Ages and their Connection With Modern Spiritualism, Theosophy, and Buddhism (Grand
Rapids, Michigan: Kregel Publications, 1975), 27; Albert T. Clay,
The Origin of Biblical Traditions: Hebrew Legends in Babylonia and
Israel
(New Haven: Yale University Press, ) 70, 216; Alfred Jeremias, The Old Testament in the Light of the Ancient East Vol. I (New
York: G. P. Putnam’s Sons, 1911), 5.
[33]
 Ancient Near East (Babylonia) Glossary and Texts, 2, http://www.piney.com/BabGloss.html (accessed June 21, 2013).
[34]
 The difference between Hades, Shoel, TarTarum, Hell?, 1, http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20081125101656AAL4zku
(accessed Aug. 12, 2013).
[35]  Stephen Charles Bandy,
Caines Cynn: A Study of Beuwolf and the Legends of Cain (Stephen Charles Bandy, 1967), 47.
[36]  Stephen Charles Bandy,
Caines Cynn: A Study of Beuwolf and the Legends of Cain (Stephen Charles Bandy, 1967), 44.
[37]
 The difference between Hades, Shoel, TarTarum, Hell?, 1, http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20081125101656AAL4
zku (accessed Aug. 12, 2013).
[38]  Stephen Charles Bandy,
Caines Cynn: A Study of Beuwolf and the Legends of Cain (Stephen Charles Bandy, 1967), 45.
[39]  Anonymous,
New Interpretation of a Portion of the Third Chapter of Genesis, Viewed in Connection With Other Parts of the Bible;
Including an Inquiry Into the Introduction, Nature, and Extent of Satanic Influence in the World
(London, J. Hatchard and Son, 1834),
73.
[40]  Stephen Charles Bandy,
Caines Cynn: A Study of Beuwolf and the Legends of Cain (Stephen Charles Bandy, 1967), 127.
[41]  Robert William Rogers,
Cuneiform Parallels to the Old Testament (New York: Jennings & Graham, 1912), 48.
[42]  Robert Bowie Johnson, Jr.,
The Parthenon Code: Mankind’s History in Marble (Annapolis, Maryland: Solving Light Books, 2004),
202.
[43]  E. S. G. Bristowe,
Cain - An Argument (Leicester: Edgar Backus, 1950), 41.
[44]  Howard B. Rand,
Study in Daniel (Merrimac, Massachusetts: Destiny Publishers, 1948), 396.
[45]  Drusilla Dunjee Houston,
Wonderful Ethiopians of the Ancient Cushite Empire (1926), 195.
[46]  Robert William Rogers,
Cuneiform Parallels to the Old Testament (New York: Jennings & Graham, 1912), 32.
[47]  Robert Bowie Johnson, Jr.,
The Parthenon Code: Mankind’s History in Marble (Annapolis, Maryland: Solving Light Books, 2004),
10.
[48]  Mrs. Sydney Bristowe, Sargon the Magnificent (London: The Covenant Publishing Co., 1927), 126
[49]  Robert Bowie Johnson, Jr.,
The Parthenon Code: Mankind’s History in Marble (Annapolis, Maryland: Solving Light Books, 2004),
11.
[50]  Robert Bowie Johnson, Jr.,
The Parthenon Code: Mankind’s History in Marble (Annapolis, Maryland: Solving Light Books, 2004),
11.
[51]   E. S. G. Bristowe,
Cain - An Argument (Leicester: Edgar Backus, 1950), 62.
[52]  Zecharia Sitchin,
There Were Giants Upon the Earth, Gods, Demigods, and Human Ancestry: The Evidence of Alien DNA
(Rochester, Vermont: Bear & Company, Inc., 2010), 127.
[53]  Alexander Heidel,
The Babylonian Genesis (Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 1942), 150.
[54]  E. S. G. Bristowe,
Cain - An Argument (Leicester: Edgar Backus, 1950), 62.
[55]  American Scientific Affiliation: Creation / Evolution Page,
In Search of the Historical Adam: Part 2, 1, http://www.asa3.
org/ASA/PSCF/1994/PSCF3-94Fischer.html (accessed April 12, 2005); Theophilus G. Pinches,
The Religion of Babylonia and Assyria,
19; Theophilus G. Pinches,
The Old Testament: In The Light of The Historical Records and Legends of Assyria and Babylonia
(Brighton: Society For Promoting Christian Knowledge, 1903), 103; Mrs. Sydney Bristowe, Sargon the Magnificent (London: The
Covenant Publishing Co., 1927), 97;
The Babylonian Legends of the Creation and the Fight Between Bel and the Dragon As Told by
Assyrian Tablets from Nineveh
(London: Harrison & Sons, 1931), 60; Alfred Jeremias, The Old Testament in the Light of the Ancient
East Vol. I
(New York: G. P. Putnam’s Sons, 1911), 102; Alfred Jeremias, The Old Testament in the Light of the Ancient East Vol. I
(New York: G. P. Putnam’s Sons, 1911), 103; E. S. G. Bristowe, Cain - An Argument (Leicester: Edgar Backus, 1950), 62.
[56]  Christian and Barbara Joy O’Brien,
The Shining Ones (Cirencester, England: Dianthus Publishing Limited, 1988), 68.
[57]  Christian and Barbara Joy O’Brien,
The Shining Ones (Cirencester, England: Dianthus Publishing Limited, 1988), 68; Ancient
Near East (Babylonia) Glossary and Texts
, 44, http://www.piney.com/BabGloss.html (accessed June 21, 2013); Zecharia Sitchin,
There Were Giants Upon the Earth, Gods, Demigods, and Human Ancestry: The Evidence of Alien DNA (Rochester, Vermont: Bear &
Company, Inc., 2010), 258; Theophilus G. Pinches,
The Old Testament: In The Light of The Historical Records and Legends of
Assyria and Babylonia
(Brighton: Society For Promoting Christian Knowledge, 1903), 115; Alfred Jeremias, The Old Testament in the
Light of the Ancient East Vol. I
(New York: G. P. Putnam’s Sons, 1911), 115.
[58]  Alfred Jeremias,
The Old Testament in the Light of the Ancient East Vol. I (New York: G. P. Putnam’s Sons, 1911), 115
[59]  American Scientific Affiliation: Creation / Evolution Page,
In Search of the Historical Adam: Part 2, http://www.asa3.
org/ASA/PSCF/1994/PSCF3-94Fischer.html (accessed April 12, 2005).
[60]  Zecharia Sitchin,
There Were Giants Upon the Earth, Gods, Demigods, and Human Ancestry: The Evidence of Alien DNA
(Rochester, Vermont: Bear & Company, Inc., 2010), 193; Ancient Near East (Babylonia) Glossary and Texts, 2, http://www.piney.
com/BabGloss.html (accessed June 21, 2013).
[61]  Zecharia Sitchin,
There Were Giants Upon the Earth, Gods, Demigods, and Human Ancestry: The Evidence of Alien DNA
(Rochester, Vermont: Bear & Company, Inc., 2010), 193; American Scientific Affiliation: Creation / Evolution Page, In Search of the
Historical Adam: Part 2
, http://www.asa3.org/ASA/PSCF/1994/PSCF3-94Fischer.html (accessed April 12, 2005).
[62]  American Scientific Affiliation: Creation / Evolution Page,
In Search of the Historical Adam: Part 2, http://www.asa3.
org/ASA/PSCF/1994/PSCF3-94Fischer.html (accessed April 12, 2005).
[63]  Robert William Rogers,
Cuneiform Parallels to the Old Testament (New York: Jennings & Graham, 1912), 76.
[64] American Scientific Affiliation: Creation / Evolution Page,
In Search of the Historical Adam: Part 2, http://www.asa3.
org/ASA/PSCF/1994/PSCF3-94Fischer.html (accessed April 12, 2005).
[65]  American Scientific Affiliation: Creation / Evolution Page,
In Search of the Historical Adam: Part 2, http://www.asa3.
org/ASA/PSCF/1994/PSCF3-94Fischer.html (accessed April 12, 2005).
[66]  American Scientific Affiliation: Creation / Evolution Page,
In Search of the Historical Adam: Part 2, 4, http://www.asa3.
org/ASA/PSCF/1994/PSCF3-94Fischer.html (accessed April 12, 2005).
[67]  American Scientific Affiliation: Creation / Evolution Page,
In Search of the Historical Adam: Part 2, 4, http://www.asa3.
org/ASA/PSCF/1994/PSCF3-94Fischer.html (accessed April 12, 2005).
[68]  American Scientific Affiliation: Creation / Evolution Page,
In Search of the Historical Adam: Part 2, 4, http://www.asa3.
org/ASA/PSCF/1994/PSCF3-94Fischer.html (accessed April 12, 2005).
[69]  Theophilus G. Pinches,
The Old Testament: In The Light of The Historical Records and Legends of Assyria and Babylonia
(Brighton: Society For Promoting Christian Knowledge, 1903), 83.
[70]  American Scientific Affiliation: Creation / Evolution Page,
In Search of the Historical Adam: Part 2, 9, http://www.asa3.
org/ASA/PSCF/1994/PSCF3-94Fischer.html (accessed April 12, 2005).
[71]  American Scientific Affiliation: Creation / Evolution Page,
In Search of the Historical Adam: Part 2, 9, http://www.asa3.
org/ASA/PSCF/1994/PSCF3-94Fischer.html (accessed April 12, 2005); Theophilus G. Pinches,
The Religion of Babylonia and Assyria,
26.
[72]  Joseph Campbell,
The Masks of God: Occidental Mythology (New York: The Viking Press), 14.
[73]  
Ancient Near East (Babylonia) Glossary and Texts, 46, http://www.piney.com/BabGloss.html (accessed June 21, 2013).
[74]  Theophilus G. Pinches,
The Religion of Babylonia and Assyria, 30.
[75]  Theophilus G. Pinches,
The Religion of Babylonia and Assyria, 30.
[76]  Robert Bowie Johnson, Jr.,
Athena and Kain: The True Meaning of Greek Myth (Annapolis, Maryland: Solving Light Books, 2003),
60.
[77]  Robert Bowie Johnson, Jr.,
Athena and Kain: The True Meaning of Greek Myth (Annapolis, Maryland: Solving Light Books, 2003),
62.
[78]  Stephen Quayle,
Genesis 6 Giants: The Master Builders of Prehistoric and Ancient Civilizations (Bozeman, Montana: End Time
Thunder Publishers, 2005), 64.
[79]  
bane, 1, http://www.thefreedictionary.com/bane (accessed Aug. 12, 2013); renegade, 1, http://www.thefreedictionary.com/
renegade (accessed Aug. 12, 2013).
[80]  Alfred Jeremias,
The Old Testament in the Light of the Ancient East Vol. I (New York: G. P. Putnam’s Sons, 1911), 105.
[81]  
Ancient Near East (Babylonia) Glossary and Texts, 19, http://www.piney.com/BabGloss.html (accessed June 21, 2013); Alfred
Jeremias,
The Old Testament in the Light of the Ancient East Vol. I (New York: G. P. Putnam’s Sons, 1911), 103; Donald Mackenzie,
Myths of Babylonia and Assyria, (1915), 35.
[82]  
Ancient Near East (Babylonia) Glossary and Texts, 10, http://www.piney.com/BabGloss.html (accessed June 21, 2013).
[83]  Zecharia Sitchin,
There Were Giants Upon the Earth, Gods, Demigods, and Human Ancestry: The Evidence of Alien DNA
(Rochester, Vermont: Bear & Company, Inc., 2010), 68.
[84]  Christian and Barbara Joy O’Brien,
The Shining Ones (Cirencester, England: Dianthus Publishing Limited, 1988), 68.
[85]  Andrew Collins,
From the Ashes of Angels (Rochester, Vermont: Bear & Company, 1996), 207.
[86]  
Ancient Near East (Babylonia) Glossary and Texts, 45, http://www.piney.com/BabGloss.html (accessed June 21, 2013).
[87]  Christian and Barbara Joy O’Brien,
The Shining Ones (Cirencester, England: Dianthus Publishing Limited, 1988), 68.
[88]  
Ancient Near East (Babylonia) Glossary and Texts, 40, http://www.piney.com/BabGloss.html (accessed June 21, 2013).
[89]  Theophilus G. Pinches,
The Religion of Babylonia and Assyria, 31; Christian and Barbara Joy O’Brien, The Shining Ones
(Cirencester, England: Dianthus Publishing Limited, 1988), 68.
[90]  Ancient Near East (Babylonia) Glossary and Texts, 45, http://www.piney.com/BabGloss.html (accessed June 21, 2013).
[91]  Philip Gardiner,
Secrets of the Serpent: in Search of the Secret Past (Foresthill Ca.: Reality press, 2006), 9; Theophilus G.
Pinches,
The Religion of Babylonia and Assyria, 20; Ancient Near East (Babylonia) Glossary and Texts, 10, http://www.piney.
com/BabGloss.html (accessed June 21, 2013).
[92]  Alfred Jeremias,
The Old Testament in the Light of the Ancient East Vol. I (New York: G. P. Putnam’s Sons, 1911), 105;
Theophilus G. Pinches,
The Old Testament: In The Light of The Historical Records and Legends of Assyria and Babylonia (Brighton:
Society For Promoting Christian Knowledge, 1903), 104;
Ancient Near East (Babylonia) Glossary and Texts, 10, http://www.piney.
com/BabGloss.html (accessed June 21, 2013).
[93]  Theophilus G. Pinches,
The Religion of Babylonia and Assyria, 20.
[94]  
Ancient Near East (Babylonia) Glossary and Texts, 10, http://www.piney.com/BabGloss.html (accessed June 21, 2013);
Theophilus G. Pinches,
The Religion of Babylonia and Assyria, 20; Bertrand L. Comparet, What Happened to Cain, 24, http://
www.posse-comitatus.org/Bible_Studies/what_happened_to_cain.htm (accessed Aug. 21, 2000 334).
[95]  Philip Gardiner,
Secrets of the Serpent: in Search of the Secret Past (Foresthill Ca.: Reality press, 2006), 9.
[96]  Mrs. Sydney Bristowe,
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Ancient Near East (Babylonia) Glossary and Texts, 39, http://www.piney.com/BabGloss.html (accessed June 21, 2013).
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Ancient Near East (Babylonia) Glossary and Texts, 3, http://www.piney.com/BabGloss.html (accessed June 21, 2013).
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Ancient Near East (Babylonia) Glossary and Texts, 17, http://www.piney.com/BabGloss.html (accessed June 21, 2013); E. S. G.
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[110]  Bertrand L. Comparet,
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Ancient Near East (Babylonia) Glossary and Texts, 27, http://www.piney.com/BabGloss.html (accessed June 21, 2013).
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Ancient Near East (Babylonia) Glossary and Texts, 27, http://www.piney.com/BabGloss.html (accessed June 21, 2013).
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In Search of the Historical Adam: Part 2, 11, http://www.asa3.
org/ASA/PSCF/1994/PSCF3-94Fischer.html (accessed April 12, 2005 320); Zecharia Sitchin,
The Lost Book of Enki (Rochester,
Vermont: Bear & Company, Inc., 2002), 6; Zecharia Sitchin,
There Were Giants Upon the Earth, Gods, Demigods, and Human
Ancestry: The Evidence of Alien DNA
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[118]  S. G. F. Brandon,
Creation Legends of the Ancient Near East (London: Hodder and Stoughton, 1963), 79.
[119]  S. G. F. Brandon,
Creation Legends of the Ancient Near East (London: Hodder and Stoughton, 1963), 79.
[120]  Christian and Barbara Joy O’Brien,
The Shining Ones (Cirencester, England: Dianthus Publishing Limited, 1988), 68.
[121]  Christian and Barbara Joy O’Brien,
The Shining Ones (Cirencester, England: Dianthus Publishing Limited, 1988), 68.
[122]  Zecharia Sitchin,
There Were Giants Upon the Earth, Gods, Demigods, and Human Ancestry: The Evidence of Alien DNA
(Rochester, Vermont: Bear & Company, Inc., 2010), 68.
[123]  Donald Mackenzie,
Myths of Babylonia and Assyria, (1915), 31; Theophilus G. Pinches, The Old Testament: In The Light of The
Historical Records and Legends of Assyria and Babylonia
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[124]  Zecharia Sitchin,
There Were Giants Upon the Earth, Gods, Demigods, and Human Ancestry: The Evidence of Alien DNA
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Cain - An Argument (Leicester: Edgar Backus, 1950), 41.
[127]  E. S. G. Bristowe,
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Ancient Near East (Babylonia) Glossary and Texts, 26, http://www.piney.com/BabGloss.html (accessed June 21, 2013).
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Ancient Near East (Babylonia) Glossary and Texts, 5, http://www.piney.com/BabGloss.html (accessed June 21, 2013).
[130]  Bertrand L. Comparet,
What Happened to Cain, 24, http://www.posse-comitatus.org/Bible_Studies/what_happened_to_cain.htm
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Ancient Near East (Babylonia) Glossary and Texts, 27, http://www.piney.com/BabGloss.html (accessed June 21, 2013).
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Ancient Near East (Babylonia) Glossary and Texts, 25, http://www.piney.com/BabGloss.html (accessed June 21, 2013).
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Ibn Ezra, Commentary on the Pentateuch: Genesis (Bereshit) (New York: Menorah Publishing Company, Inc., 1988), 63; E. S. G.
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Ancient Near East (Babylonia) Glossary and Texts, 2, http://www.piney.com/BabGloss.html (accessed June 21, 2013); Adapa, 1,
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Cuneiform Parallels to the Old Testament (New York: Jennings & Graham, 1912), 69.
[137]  American Scientific Affiliation: Creation / Evolution Page,
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[138]  Mrs. Sydney Bristowe,
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[139]  Mrs. Sydney Bristowe,
Sargon the Magnificent (London: The Covenant Publishing Co., 1927), 93.
[140]  Bertrand L. Comparet,
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[141]  Bertrand L. Comparet,
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[142]  Victor H. Matthews and Don C. Benjamin,
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Paulist Press, 1991), 55.
[143]  Drusilla Dunjee Houston,
Wonderful Ethiopians of the Ancient Cushite Empire (1926), 172.
[144]  E. S. G. Bristowe,
Cain - An Argument (Leicester: Edgar Backus, 1950), 5.
[145]  Mrs. Sydney Bristowe,
Sargon the Magnificent (London: The Covenant Publishing Co., 1927), 27.
[146]  Drusilla Dunjee Houston,
Wonderful Ethiopians of the Ancient Cushite Empire (1926), 172.
[147]  Theophilus G. Pinches,
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Ancient Near East (Babylonia) Glossary and Texts, 43, http://www.piney.com/BabGloss.html (accessed June 21, 2013).
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[151]  Bertrand L. Comparet,
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Sargon the Magnificent (London: The Covenant Publishing Co., 1927), 93; Bertrand L. Comparet, What
Happened to Cain
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Strong’s H5175 -
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[156]  Mrs. Sydney Bristowe,
Sargon the Magnificent (London: The Covenant Publishing Co., 1927), 26; E. S. G. Bristowe, Cain - An
Argument
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[157]  Robert William Rogers,
Cuneiform Parallels to the Old Testament (New York: Jennings & Graham, 1912), 135-137.
[158]  Theophilus G. Pinches,
The Religion of Babylonia and Assyria, 22.
[159]  Zecharia Sitchin,
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[160]  
The Babylonian Legends of the Creation and the Fight Between Bel and the Dragon As Told by Assyrian Tablets from Nineveh
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[161]  Victor H. Matthews and Don C. Benjamin,
Old Testament Parallels: Laws and Stories from the Ancient Near East (New York:
Paulist Press, 1991), 9.
[162]  Theophilus G. Pinches,
The Religion of Babylonia and Assyria, 20.
[163]  Theophilus G. Pinches,
The Religion of Babylonia and Assyria, 22.
[164]  E. S. G. Bristowe,
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[165]  Bertrand L. Comparet,
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Ancient Near East (Babylonia) Glossary and Texts, 31, http://www.piney.com/BabGloss.html (accessed June 21, 2013);
Theophilus G. Pinches,
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Ancient Near East (Babylonia) Glossary and Texts, 27, http://www.piney.com/BabGloss.html (accessed June 21, 2013); The
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The Babylonian Legends of the Creation and the Fight Between Bel and the Dragon As Told by Assyrian Tablets from Nineveh
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[172]  Albert T. Clay,
The Origin of Biblical Traditions: Hebrew Legends in Babylonia and Israel (New Haven: Yale University Press,
1923) 79.
[173]  Albert T. Clay,
The Origin of Biblical Traditions: Hebrew Legends in Babylonia and Israel (New Haven: Yale University Press,
1923) 79;
The Babylonian Legends of the Creation and the Fight Between Bel and the Dragon As Told by Assyrian Tablets from
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Ancient Near East (Babylonia) Glossary and Texts, 17, http://www.piney.com/BabGloss.html (accessed June 21, 2013);
Theophilus G. Pinches,
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[175]  Donald Mackenzie,
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Babylonian Legends of the Creation and the Fight Between Bel and the Dragon As Told by Assyrian Tablets from Nineveh
(London:
Harrison & Sons, 1931), 14; Howard Schwartz,
Tree of Souls: The Mythology of Judaism (Oxford: University Press, 2004), 76; Robert
William Rogers,
Cuneiform Parallels to the Old Testament (New York: Jennings & Graham, 1912), 10; James E. Thorold Rogers,
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Ancient Near East (Babylonia) Glossary and Texts, 47, http://www.piney.com/BabGloss.html (accessed June 21, 2013).
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[180]  Donald Mackenzie,
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[181]  Robert William Rogers,
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[182]  
Ancient Near East (Babylonia) Glossary and Texts, 47, http://www.piney.com/BabGloss.html (accessed June 21, 2013).
[183]  I. P. Cory,
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Ancient Near East (Babylonia) Glossary and Texts, 19, http://www.piney.com/BabGloss.html (accessed June 21, 2013).
[185]  Christian and Barbara Joy O’Brien, The Shining Ones (Cirencester, England: Dianthus Publishing Limited, 1988), 87.
[186]  Howard Schwartz,
Tree of Souls: The Mythology of Judaism (Oxford: University Press, 2004), 112.
[187]  Robert William Rogers,
Cuneiform Parallels to the Old Testament (New York: Jennings & Graham, 1912), 65.
[188]  Robert William Rogers,
Cuneiform Parallels to the Old Testament (New York: Jennings & Graham, 1912), 67.
[189]  
Rabbi Abraham Ibn Ezra’s Commentary on the Creation, trans. Michael Linetsky (Northvale, New Jersey: Jason Aronson Inc.,
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[190]  Drusilla Dunjee Houston, Wonderful Ethiopians of the Ancient Cushite Empire (1926), 170.
[191]  Robert William Rogers,
Cuneiform Parallels to the Old Testament (New York: Jennings & Graham, 1912), 33.
[192]  
The Babylonian Legends of the Creation and the Fight Between Bel and the Dragon As Told by Assyrian Tablets from Nineveh
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[193]  S. G. F. Brandon,
Creation Legends of the Ancient Near East (London: Hodder and Stoughton, 1963), 79.
[194]  Theophilus G. Pinches,
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Ancient Near East (Babylonia) Glossary and Texts, 17, http://www.piney.com/BabGloss.html (accessed June 21, 2013).
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Ancient Near East (Babylonia) Glossary and Texts, 47, http://www.piney.com/BabGloss.html (accessed June 21, 2013).
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[199]  Donald Mackenzie,
Myths of Babylonia and Assyria, (1915), 35.
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The Babylonian Legends of the Creation and the Fight Between Bel and the Dragon As Told by Assyrian Tablets from Nineveh
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[201]  Albert T. Clay,
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[202]  Andrew Collins,
Gods of Eden: Egypt’s Lost Legacy and the Genesis of Civilization (London: Headline Book Publishing, 1998),
281.
[203]  
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[205]  Theophilus G. Pinches,
The Religion of Babylonia and Assyria, 22.
[206]  
The Babylonian Legends of the Creation and the Fight Between Bel and the Dragon As Told by Assyrian Tablets from Nineveh
(London: Harrison & Sons, 1931), 55.
[207]  Andrew Collins,
Gods of Eden: Egypt’s Lost Legacy and the Genesis of Civilization (London: Headline Book Publishing, 1998),
281.
[208]  Bertrand L. Comparet,
What Happened to Cain, 21, http://www.posse-comitatus.org/Bible_Studies/what_happened_to_cain.htm
(accessed Aug. 21, 2000).
[209]  
The Babylonian Legends of the Creation and the Fight Between Bel and the Dragon As Told by Assyrian Tablets from Nineveh
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[210]  Zecharia Sitchin,
The Lost Book of Enki (Rochester, Vermont: Bear & Company, Inc., 2002), introduction 1; James B. Pritchard,
Ancient Near Eastern Texts Relating to the Old Testament (Princeton, New Jersey: Princeton University Press, 1955), 52, 55.
[211]  
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(London: Harrison & Sons, 1931), 22.
[212]  Christian and Barbara Joy O’Brien,
The Shining Ones (Cirencester, England: Dianthus Publishing Limited, 1988), 87.
[213]  Victor H. Matthews and Don C. Benjamin,
Old Testament Parallels: Laws and Stories from the Ancient Near East (New York:
Paulist Press, 1991), 8.
[214]  
Ancient Near East (Babylonia) Glossary and Texts, 6, http://www.piney.com/BabGloss.html (accessed June 21, 2013).
[215]  Zecharia Sitchin,
There Were Giants Upon the Earth, Gods, Demigods, and Human Ancestry: The Evidence of Alien DNA
(Rochester, Vermont: Bear & Company, Inc., 2010), 125.
[216]  
The Babylonian Legends of the Creation and the Fight Between Bel and the Dragon As Told by Assyrian Tablets from Nineveh
(London: Harrison & Sons, 1931), 22; Christian and Barbara Joy O’Brien, The Shining Ones (Cirencester, England: Dianthus
Publishing Limited, 1988), 144;
Ancient Near East (Babylonia) Glossary and Texts, 25, http://www.piney.com/BabGloss.html
(accessed June 21, 2013); Christian and Barbara Joy O’Brien,
The Shining Ones (Cirencester, England: Dianthus Publishing
Limited, 1988), 147.
[217]  Victor H. Matthews and Don C. Benjamin,
Old Testament Parallels: Laws and Stories from the Ancient Near East (New York:
Paulist Press, 1991), 8.
[218]  Christian and Barbara Joy O’Brien,
The Shining Ones (Cirencester, England: Dianthus Publishing Limited, 1988), 144; Ancient
Near East (Babylonia) Glossary and Texts
, 25, http://www.piney.com/BabGloss.html (accessed June 21, 2013).
[219]  Christian and Barbara Joy O’Brien,
The Shining Ones (Cirencester, England: Dianthus Publishing Limited, 1988), 144.
[220]  Christian and Barbara Joy O’Brien,
The Shining Ones (Cirencester, England: Dianthus Publishing Limited, 1988), 144.
[221]  Zecharia Sitchin,
The 12th Planet (New York: Avon Books, 1976), 328-32.
[222]  
The Epic of Atrahasis, http://www.piney.com/Atrahasis.html (accessed July 6, 2013).
[223]  Robert William Rogers,
Cuneiform Parallels to the Old Testament (New York: Jennings & Graham, 1912), 57; Albert T. Clay,
The Origin of Biblical Traditions: Hebrew Legends in Babylonia and Israel (New Haven: Yale University Press, ) 66.
[224]  S. G. F. Brandon,
Creation Legends of the Ancient Near East (London: Hodder and Stoughton, 1963), 110.
[225]  Victor H. Matthews and Don C. Benjamin,
Old Testament Parallels: Laws and Stories from the Ancient Near East (New York:
Paulist Press, 1991), 15.
[226]  
Ancient Near East (Babylonia) Glossary and Texts, 17, http://www.piney.com/BabGloss.html (accessed June 21, 2013).
[227]  
The Babylonian Legends of the Creation and the Fight Between Bel and the Dragon As Told by Assyrian Tablets from Nineveh
(London: Harrison & Sons, 1931), 73.
[228]  Victor H. Matthews and Don C. Benjamin,
Old Testament Parallels: Laws and Stories from the Ancient Near East (New York:
Paulist Press, 1991), 9.
[229]  Victor H. Matthews and Don C. Benjamin,
Old Testament Parallels: Laws and Stories from the Ancient Near East (New York:
Paulist Press, 1991), 15.
[230]  Robert William Rogers,
Cuneiform Parallels to the Old Testament (New York: Jennings & Graham, 1912), 57.
[231]  
The Babylonian Legends of the Creation and the Fight Between Bel and the Dragon As Told by Assyrian Tablets from Nineveh
(London: Harrison & Sons, 1931), 68-69.
[232]  S. G. F. Brandon,
Creation Legends of the Ancient Near East (London: Hodder and Stoughton, 1963), 70.
[233]  James B. Pritchard,
Ancient Near Eastern Texts Relating to the Old Testament (Princeton, New Jersey: Princeton University
Press, 1955), 43; S. G. F. Brandon,
Creation Legends of the Ancient Near East (London: Hodder and Stoughton, 1963), 81; Robert
William Rogers,
Cuneiform Parallels to the Old Testament (New York: Jennings & Graham, 1912), 50.
[234]  Albert T. Clay,
The Origin of Biblical Traditions: Hebrew Legends in Babylonia and Israel (New Haven: Yale University Press) 83.
[235]  Theophilus G. Pinches,
The Old Testament: In The Light of The Historical Records and Legends of Assyria and Babylonia
(Brighton: Society For Promoting Christian Knowledge, 1903), 1; The Babylonian Legends of the Creation and the Fight Between Bel
and the Dragon As Told by Assyrian Tablets from Nineveh
(London: Harrison & Sons, 1931), 65.
[236]  
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(London: Harrison & Sons, 1931), 65.
[237]  
The Babylonian Legends of the Creation and the Fight Between Bel and the Dragon As Told by Assyrian Tablets from Nineveh
(London: Harrison & Sons, 1931), 30.
[238]  
The Babylonian Legends of the Creation and the Fight Between Bel and the Dragon As Told by Assyrian Tablets from Nineveh
(London: Harrison & Sons, 1931), 66.
[239]  Victor H. Matthews and Don C. Benjamin,
Old Testament Parallels: Laws and Stories from the Ancient Near East (New York:
Paulist Press, 1991), 15.
[240]  
The Babylonian Legends of the Creation and the Fight Between Bel and the Dragon As Told by Assyrian Tablets from Nineveh
(London: Harrison & Sons, 1931), 66.
[241]  Robert William Rogers,
Cuneiform Parallels to the Old Testament (New York: Jennings & Graham, 1912), 48.
[242]  
The Babylonian Legends of the Creation and the Fight Between Bel and the Dragon As Told by Assyrian Tablets from Nineveh
(London: Harrison & Sons, 1931), 31.
[243]  
The Babylonian Legends of the Creation and the Fight Between Bel and the Dragon As Told by Assyrian Tablets from Nineveh
(London: Harrison & Sons, 1931), 30.
[244]  Zecharia Sitchin,
There Were Giants Upon the Earth, Gods, Demigods, and Human Ancestry: The Evidence of Alien DNA
(Rochester, Vermont: Bear & Company, Inc., 2010), 125-126.

10 All the lands were sea;
31 Lord Marduk piled up a dam at the edge of the sea;
32 …a swamp he made into dry land.
36 [Bricks he laid, the brick] mold he built;
37 [The house he built], the city he built;
38 [The city he made], living creatures he placed (therein)…[232]

We know Cain built at least one city, according to the Bible. Among them, in pagan lore, was one
probably built in the lands of Eden:
Eridu.[233] This probably explains why Eridu was known as “the
first city” of the plain, and it continues to strengthen our postulation that the land of Eridu was, in fact,
Eden.[234] Beyond this primary city, there was another city for them to undertake; a city to the north, a
very special city:
Babylon.[235] There were a number of quotes, in regards to its construction:[236]

The Anunnaki, wishing to give an expression of their admiration for Marduk’s heroism, decided to build
him a shrine or temple. To this Marduk (Cain) agreed, and chose Babylon… The Anunnaki themselves
made the bricks…
                                                                         (Budge, 1931, p. 30)[237]

The Seven Tablets of Creation
46 The Anunnaki wielded the hoe; for one year they moulded bricks…[238]

To celebrate Cain’s coronation, the “gods built… the city of Babylon, where they transfer all their divine
titles to Marduk (Cain)…”[239] Cain sanctified this city, blessed it, and made note of the fallen angels who
built it:

The Seven Tablets of Creation
52 He (Cain) made the gods his fathers to take
    their seats… [saying]: “This Babylon
    shall be your abode.[240]

Bilingual of Creation
14 Babylon was made…
16 The holy city, the dwelling of the heart’s desire, they proclaimed supreme.[241]

It was here the Nephilim, the Igigi, and all who opposed the God of the Bible, founded a temple, inscribed
50 titles to their chief “god," and dedicated this entire area as an earthly symbol of their undying devotion
to Cain: “son of perdition;” the son of the Serpent. Because of this: “…Babylon first became the capital of
the country, and
mistress of the greater part of the known world.”[242] No wonder why the city was given
the name it had.[243] No wonder why Cain exclaimed:

                                                I will call its name Bab-ili [‘Gateway of the gods’].
                                                                                 (Sitchen, 2010, p. 125-126)[244]


No wonder why Babylon was so unique,
and so hated, by God!

…hence, we go up another rung in the deciphering of
Mystery Babylon.


Now that we’ve looked into the pagan view of early Creation, and their ‘twists’ on the early people and
terrestrial angels of Genesis, let’s look more at what may have
really gone on in the Garden of Eden -
The Real Adam and Eve, and what huge ramifications these events had on our world, ever since.
They (the Igigi) groaned and blamed each other,
Grumbled over the masses of excavated soil:

(After this, the Igigi went to complain to Enlil (the Serpent); and exclaimed:)
We have put a stop to the digging.
The load is excessive, it is killing us!
Our work is too hard, the trouble too much!
…create a mortal man
So that he may bear the yoke, the work of Enlil,
Let man bear the load of the gods!
Nintu (probably Cain) shall mix the clay
With his (the god Kingu’s) flesh and blood.
Then a god and a man
Will be mixed together in clay.

(The woman who was now chosen to create man...)
…called up the Anunnaki, the great gods.
The Igigi, the great gods,
Spat spittle upon the clay

(Said this creator-woman:)
You have slaughtered a god together with his intelligence.
I have relieved you of your hard work,
I have imposed your load on man.
You have bestowed noise on mankind.
I have undone the fetter and granted freedom.
[222]

This was one pagan view of man’s creation, and the rationale for their existence - to work for the Igigi,
the Anunnaki, the Serpent, and Adam (Anu)! This could also have easily been used as rationale for
promoting servitude, even the enslavement, of mankind in the future: naturally, men were supposed to
"work for the gods."

Again, just as the destruction of the personified
Tiamat and Apsu, it was Cain and the Serpent (and even
Eve) who were given credit for the creation and “civilization” of mankind.[223]

-
…let us create mankind.
 The service of the gods be their portion,[224]

It seems these ancient texts really did not put this new breed of human in a very good light!

The Enuma Elish
4 I will knead blood and bone into a savage,
5 Aborigine will be its name.
6 The Aborigines will do the gods’ work
7 The savages will set the gods free.
29 Kingu (i.e. God) planned the uprising!
32 …Ea executed him by cutting his throat.
33 Ea formed the Aborigines from Kingu’s blood,
34 Marduk put the Aborigines to work,
35 And set the gods free[225]

According to Sumerian myth, we see Eve (Enki) was their creator, “having devised men as slaves to the
gods.”[226] Its interesting to note all of the disrespect towards people, as well the acceptable attitudes
towards slavery, occurring in ancient paganism; and how it could be traced all the way back to these times!
Yes, there are Biblical traditions which do mention
pre-Adamites: human individuals put on earth to assist
Adam and the angels in the workings of the Garden, but the Bible never implies slavery; there just had to
be a hierarchy, or working order. Coming from a theology and religion which often rails about how “mean”
and oppressive God and His Bible are, it becomes interesting to see their
own perceptions towards human
beings and slavery back then. As long as it is for the sake of Cain, the Serpent, and these terrestrial angels
(or “gods”), it seems to be all right.

It also seems obvious that these Anunnaki and Igigi turned towards the “ways” of Cain and the Serpent:

The Seven Tablets of Creation
116 Father Enlil (the Serpent) proclaimed his (Cain’s) name, “Lord of the Lands.”
117 All the Igigi repeated the title.[227]

According to Biblical tradition, the Nephilim and Watchers also seemed to have been taken up by the
“ways” of Cain and the Serpent (before and after the Fall). Pagan mythology, as well, stated much of this
same; they even considered Cain their creator![228] Cain was also credited for “allowing” Adam to be
their preliminary supervisor, at least over a period a time.[229] Cain quickly ascended into the well-
respected head of them all:

                                                  (He is)… sustainer of the Igigi and the Anunnaki,
                                                                                      (Rogers, 1912, p. 57)[230]

The Seven Tablets of Creation
112 (He)… hath made glad the hearts of the Anunnaki,
123 He hath allotted stations to the Igigi and the Anunnaki.[231]

Beyond the early irrigation and digging projects around the Garden (which, as we know, were quickly
delegated to human beings), these two groups of angels would begin to take on another endeavor, after
the Fall:


The Epic of Atrahasis
Anu (Adam) their father was king,
Their counselor warrior Enlil (the Serpent),
And Enlil took the earth for his people.
The gods had to dig out canals,
Had to clear channels
the lifelines of the land.
The gods dug out the Tigris river
And then dug out the Euphrates.
The Anunnaki of the sky
Made the Igigi bear the workload.
…they bore the excess,
Hard work, night and day.
The angelic counterparts of the Anunnaki were the Igigi.[214] They do appear to be different in ways.
Just what were these individuals? How were they different? One author describes the name
Igi-gi as,
"Those Who Observe and See."[215] We may also be able to assume (from pagan sources) that the Igigi
came into existence a little later than the Anunnaki; the reason possibly was because the Anunnaki were
considered “senior” or “of the older generation.”[216] If not an older group of angels, what could be
another reason the Anunnaki were considered "senior?" The following ancient text may provide us some
information:

The Enuma Elish
16 Anu (Adam) made Nadimmud-Ea (Eve) in his image
20 …Unmatched among the Igigi, his ancestors…[217]

Because the Igigi could appear as being among "the ancestors" of Adam, one could surmise that, at
their creation, their souls could have come from the same place as Adam's soul: heaven.[218] We already
postulated the souls of the Nephilim/Anunnaki came from
Deep. Could the Anunnaki have been able to
retain their memory (and wisdom) from the world before our own; could they have known what went on in
this world, and why God destroyed it? This could easily have given them a vast amount of hidden (occult)
knowledge to draw from, unlike the Igigi counterparts. This knowledge of our previous world could have
made the Anunnaki very powerful, and “senior” in rank.
To further extrapolate, pagan sources stated the terrestrial Igigi were probably of a
laboring class, assis-
tants to the knowledgeable Anunnaki.[219] A number of them were large; and a number short, squat, or
delicately built. These were often thought to be craftsmen; particularly metal workers.[220] Most of this
does seem to corroborate Biblical traditions of one specific group of angels: the
Watchers. Could these
Igigi be the pagan version of the giant (and dwarfed) Watchers of Biblical tradition? As we know (in
Overpowering the Sethites), a number of these Watchers remained in the sky after the Fall, for a time, to
“watch” over the human race below.[221] Some of the smaller ones may have been even assigned to
work on the earth before the Fall, to help out in the Garden of Eden.

One thing is probably true: these Anunnaki and Igigi, through their divine knowledge and other-worldly
talents, were, undoubtedly, known to the ancients as major or minor "
gods."

The next question one might have, naturally, could be:
why where these two groups of angels (or human-
oid beings with angelic qualities) be put on the earth in the first place? We know the Nephilim and
Watchers were there to help Adam in working the Garden (according to Biblical tradition). Paganism,
however, associates these terrestrial angels to one more major event in our cosmos. What happens next
involved a lot of hard work, grumbling, and the creation of a major element of our planet:
man!

In one of the more popular ancient Babylonian texts –
Atrahasis - we have the pagan rationale behind
man’s creation. In selected pieces of this text, we have:

The Enuma Elish
4 No Anunnaki
5 There was nothing…
7 No Igigi created,[213]
Just who, or what, were the Anunnaki? As we recall, traditions surround the Bible about the Nephilim -
the 50-or-so grumbling angels who complained about Adam (in
Nephilim & Cainites). These were
probably upper-level terrestrial angels of the Garden (of whom the Serpent was probably akin to). Pagan
and Babylonian mythology also seemed to have their own version of the Nephilim: the
Anunnaki. The
name
Anunnaki could have meanings such as “those who from heaven to earth came” or “conceived as
begotten by the heaven-god Anu (Adam)…”[210] Could these be the same angelic beings of our
previous world, their souls brought up from the
Deep by God to work under Adam in the Garden? Could
these even be the angelic
Light of Genesis 1:3 (that God brought up on the First day)? Some pagan lore
even notates the Anunnaki as “the greater gods of light."[211] Interestingly enough, there were even
sources which state there were 50 of these Anunnaki that were called “great:”

                                      
                 “The Great Lords were fifty in number…”
                                                                              (O'Brien, 1988, p. 87)[212]

Beyond their own version of the
Nephilim, there could be another Babylonian group of angels in this
same area:
                        Marduk (Cain) went forth to battle with the monster Tiamat, who was slain…
                                                                                            (Clay, 1923, p. 66)[201]

                                            Marduk (Cain) conquered the face of the Deep…
                                                                                            (Collins, 1998, p. 281)[202]

He became the ultimate decision maker; the dictator of the moral lives of his mother, father, and adopted
father, as well.[203]

The Fifty Names
6 (Cain) Who makest strait the direction of Anu (Adam), Bel (the Serpent), [and
  Ea (Eve)]…[204]

                                            …without him the ‘sun-god could not give judgment.’
                                                                          (Pinches, 1906, p. 22)[205]

The Seven Tablets of Creation
34 They set him (Cain) on the road which leadeth to peace and obedience.[206]

                                           (Cain)… would be seen as initiating a new world order.
                                                                         (Collins, 1998, p. 281)[207]

This "order" of Cain and the Serpent eventually became the foundation of the
system of Mystery Babylon!
At this time, it was just in its infancy.

Cain “gave” the world much knowledge and opportunity to improve the harsh world the ancients lived
in, after the Fall. Just because he gave the people a lot to improve their lives, however, doesn’t mean the
world was better, overall.[208] As most of us know, just because there was the addition of a good deal of
divine (occult) knowledge doesn’t mean the post-Fall society was on their way towards a life of peace and
prosperity. With the increase of divine knowledge came the increase of unfettered immorality - which
would eventually drive them, and their societies,
back into the direction of chaos. There’s, simply, a great
amount of hidden knowledge to our world that God just doesn’t want us to know about (probably, for some
very good reason). Sometimes, simpler is better. What a price the ancients had to pay: they turned their
backs on the God who, in fact, created them!

Cain tried to lead people towards his
own views of spiritual wisdom and immortality through his own
“ways:” the opposite extremes of the God of the Bible - a lot of them dictated by, none other than, the
Serpent himself!

Beyond these two original organizers of pagan religion, one could guess that they had other forms of
assistance to help get their word out -
angelic help.

The Creation of Man
29 Marduk (Cain), the King of the gods, divided…
    above and below the Anunnaki.
33 And had fixed their decrees for the Anunnaki of heaven
    and earth…[209]

The Anunnaki & Igigi
(Cain had great reverence for the Serpent, his probable father. They were almost looked upon as two of
the same – like father, like son! As in Biblical tradition, Cain’s face had the brightness of an angel.[169]
Cain would become so “great” and powerful over time that he eventually would take over the “sun-god”
position of paganism, as well – ahead of Adam, and now the Serpent.
Cain, in the Bible, also worked in agriculture: he was a farmer. The above descriptions seem to also
parallel Sargon, in so many ways.)


Wow, all of this honor and prestige to the Biblical character Cain. Again, it is getting seemingly easier
and easier to equate these gods, one to another; as well, to Adam, Eve, Cain, and the Serpent!

Let’s continue on, and see how the whole creation process, according to paganism, was personified into
“gods,” or some tyrannical
force, and see how the “good” gods of paganism (i.e. the Serpent and, now,
Cain) “saved” the world from the “evil” acts of who would have been the Biblical God, and his viceroys,
Adam and Abel. Let’s see how pagan lore transformed the Serpent and Cain into the actual “creators” in
our present world, and how they “transformed” it was into what it is, today. Again, please read the following
with the assumption that these mythological stories were out to state the “opposite” of what the Bible was
probably stating. We’ll see that the evil “gods” and forces of paganism will begin to show through their
real colors.

The "Evil" God

First, we have a probable, pagan interpretation of the “mean” God of the Bible, Himself: Kingu. The
ancient pagans had at least one personification of this Biblical God, it seems - and it wasn’t a good one,
of course. The “mean” god of ancient lore was also known as the “Dragon of Chaos,” or “Head of the
Devils.”[170] Interesting enough, this
Kingu was also a god who, according to one source, was known
as
Tammuz (i.e. Abel). Interesting how Abel was inserted into this same story; placed alongside the
“mean” God of the Bible.
Kingu was also considered:

…the counterpart or equivalent, of Anu, the Sky-god, in the kingdom of darkness, for it is said in the
text Kingu ‘was exalter and received the power of Anu,’ i.e. he possessed the same power and attributes
as Anu.                
                                                                         (Budge, 1931, p. 20)[171]

In other words, Kingu’s counterpart or equivalent was also
Adam! It seems obvious pagan mythology links
the three, for some reason. Kingu seems, as well, to be the pagan personification of the
chaos brought to
our planet just before Adam (i.e. at the “Six-Day Creation”).
Speaking of chaos, there are more pagan personifications of the “evil” devastation at this time:

When George Smith (an archaeologist) first interpreted the creation fragments, he translated Apsu ‘the
Abyss’…
                                                                                (Clay, 1923, p. 79)[172]

Apsu

According to Biblical traditions, we recall an Abyss, located deep beneath the earth. Also known as the
Deep, or Darkness of the Deep, we’ve found a pagan personification of the same “darkness, night and
evil:”
Apsu.[173] Seems the Biblical Deep and the pagan Apsu could be one in the same; both seem to
refer to the same idea of an underworld.
According to pagan and Babylonian mythology, the Serpent and Cain were both credited for “conquering”
this Apsu. To them, it wasn’t a supernatural “holding cell,” where the God of the Bible placed souls
devastated from the previous world; it was a place of true darkness and evil - a place that needed some
type of “conquering,” by some special deity! It seemed that most everything of God’s world before Adam
needed some type of conquering, refashioning, or redefining back then. Why?
One reason was, perhaps, the pagan elders were trying to trivialize the awesome power and righteous
judgment of the world before, by God! It’s should now be fairly obvious to see the opposing directional
polarities of pagan and Biblical traditions. With the ancient world “needing help” from some tyrannical
gods or forces, all it took was for these gods of paganism to come in, and save the day!
The “victory” over Apsu represents one example of how Cain, merely by just being himself, was credited
for “conquering” this
Deep. After this, Cain allowed his mother a new position of authority: Eve was now
blessed with the responsibility (and rule) over this Apsu, and all that went with it (i.e. the waters of the
Deep, the souls within, etc.).[174] We already know that Eve, in her various pagan avatars, was
authorized to have power over natural and supernatural elements of our planet which were often related
to
water.[175]

Tiamat

We know the ancients believed there were waters all around the earth – in, above, and below. The Apsu,
as we know, were considered the waters of the earth Eve ruled (on the terrestrial earth, and below). There
is another personification of “evil,” in regards to these waters,
Tiamat, which was a personification of the
primordial abyss of waters in our
oceans. Tiamat seems to have been the primeval, watery Chaos which
covered our earth at the beginning of Genesis' “Six-Day Creation.”[176]
Interestingly enough, this
Tiamat was also thought of as the formlessness and void on our planet
during these early times; an interesting choice of words, here![177] We know, from Genesis 1:2, our
planet was once in chaos, covered entirely with
water, as well as being without form and void.
Tiamat seems to be another pagan equivalent of a “mean” God’s judgment of our previous world. She
(Tiamat) didn’t represent any righteous, and, probably, well-deserved judgment of a formerly corrupt earth.
She was “the universe's wish to continue this return to Chaos.”[178]

                        The helpers of Tiamat were placed under command of a god called Kingu…
                                                                                    (Budge, 1931, p. 20)[179]

                       …the dragon (Tiamat) and Apsu, her husband, the arch-enemy of the gods.
                                                                                    (Mackenzie, 1915, p. 38)[180]

The Story of Creation
80 They have jointed their forces, they prepare battle.[181]

Whatever “evil” was brought to our world by God at this time, there, somehow, needed to be "new" gods
of paganism to “make” it all right.

The Serpent was First

                            In pagan mythology, this Tiamat… was slain by Bel, the chief deity.
                                    ("Ancient Near East (Babylonia) Glossary and Texts", n. d., p. 47)[182]

Bel, the Serpent of paganism, was the original “god” credited for slaying all of these “evil” powers.

...Belus (another god equivalent to Bel, the Serpent) came, and cut the woman asunder: and, out of one
half of her, he formed the earth, and of the other half the heavens. This Belus divided the darkness (both
above and below the earth), and reduced the universe to order.
                      (Cory, 1832, p. 58)[183]

What once was a world of chaos was now a "new world order" – according to pagan idealism. This was
the
true beginning of the Political/Religious side of Mystery Babylon. Through concepts such as these
“conquering” roles, the Serpent was given such a powerful symbolic position he was now believed to be
responsible for most natural, elemental changes on our planet, including fertility, prosperity, as well as
famine and catastrophe![184]

  
                                      The lord Enlil (the Serpent) brought prosperity to the Land.
                                                                            (O'Brien, 1988, p. 87)[185]

The “Sun” vs. “Moon”

It’s fairly obvious the early pagans gave the Serpent all the glory. The “evil” elements (i.e. God) may
have tried to put the glory of this “god” down, and his entire movement, but it would not last for long.
We know the “sun” was once a pagan symbol of Adam. We know the “moon” was a symbol of Sin - a
“spiritual” avatar of the Serpent. Why would Adam, in pagan lore, be given a symbol so much brighter,
and, seemingly, so much more powerful than the Serpent, in this case? Why, if he would only end up
being
regent of the Serpent? Looking at information from these pagan accounts we can gather more of
the same story of before.

We also know that God cursed the Serpent, after the Fall. Before this, the Serpent was almost as powerful
as Adam. Now, the “evil” Biblical God, by His curse, “demoted” the Serpent. Instead of being almost as
powerful as the
son or sun god, he was only a fraction of what he was, before. With the sun being the
symbol of Adam, and the moon the serpent, the entire story could be put forth in the celestial signs of
nature! One Biblical commentary describes it as follows:

God rebuked the moon, and formed the light and the stars. The moon diminished itself to rule only at
night.
                                                                                          (Schwartz, 2004, p. 112)[186]

Interestingly, one ancient Babylonian text may also describe it:

The Seven Evil Demons
25 When Enlil (the Serpent) heard these tiding, a plan in his heart
    he pondered…
26 With Ea (Eve)… he took counsel.
28 With Anu (Adam) he divided the lordship of the whole heaven,

It was at this time that, “The evil gods (i.e. the God of the Bible) darken the moon by an eclipse,
Shamash (Adam) helping them by withdrawing his light from the moon.”[187]

The Seven Evil Demons
47 Enlil (the Serpent) saw the darkening of the hero Sin (the “spiritual” Serpent)
60 Son of a prince, the gleaming Sin has been sadly darkened in heaven…[188]

According to these accounts, for a time the Serpent (Enlil) and Eve (Ea) worked together in the Garden.
They counseled each other. The Serpent and Adam (Anu) may have divided their dominance or lordship
over the management of others. Adam, of course, had the final authority, but the serpent, probably, was
a close second. It’s interesting to see how, in the sky, one could postulate the sun and moon has the
same dimension: when a total eclipse of the sun occurs, the moon totally blocks out the sun. This is
because they are exactly the same dimension in the sky![189]
As in the story of Adam and the Serpent, the two were almost the same, in role and responsibility. After
the “evil” God of the Bible diminished the Serpent’s power, however, his symbol,
the moon, diminished in
its brightness. The sun remained bright in the sky, the moon, now, a mere shadow. As we recall, Adam
"helped" God to try to "keep him down" (or dim). The only thing the moon was seemingly able to do, now,
was to
oppose the sun’s brightness and influence over the planet. The moon god - the Serpent -
antagonized the sun god Adam (and his God), now his light was demoted to rule only the night, and all
that touched it.
But, of course, the Serpent would not go down that easily. Before you know it, he would rise up again,
and regain this primary position – thanks to the pagan religion and people who followed it! Even going
beyond Adam, the Serpent would be the primary god for the world to follow, and be Adam’s replacement.
The Serpent, with the birth of pagan religion, would now evolve into his "higher,"
spiritual form – first, as
the moon god, now transcending Adam’s position into the rightful sun god. He now had domain over both.

Interestingly, in some ancient Babylonian cities, the “moon god was considered father of the sun
god!”[190] This Serpent was also consigned “to determine the day” – to influence the thoughts or moral
directions of the sun god, maybe? The Bible did say the Serpent, or Satan, would become “god of this
world” (II Cor. 4:4).
Even though the Serpent (as the “moon god”) was raised back to his former position of “greatness,” it
would not be because of him, alone. The up-and-coming
Cain - his son – would help the Serpent
command much of his dignity and glory.

The Story of Creation
12 The Moon-god he caused to shine forth, to him confided the night.[191]
13
He set him for the government (?) of the night, to determine the day.[192]

On top of elevating the Serpent, Cain, as we know, assigned his mother
Eve a position in this early
Babylonian “pantheon.” According to paganism, she would follow in the direction of Cain and the Serpent
during some periods of her life. Eve may have even stayed right along the side of the Serpent, at least for
a while!
We know, beyond the supernatural “waters” of the underworld, that Eve and the Serpent were both in
charge of the Garden’s water-works, as well as making sure those who worked in the fields were
productive. The two probably maintained these same positions in pagan societies
after the Fall:

-
The plow and the yoke he directed,
- …Enki (Eve) caused the… ox to…;
- To the pure crops he roared,
- In the steadfast field he made the grain grow;
- Enki (Eve) placed in their charge.
- The lord called to the steadfast field, he caused it to produce much grain,
- The… grains he heaped up for the granary,
- Enki (Eve) added granary to granary,[193]

Obviously, it wasn’t only
Adam producing bread at this time. Even though Eve and the Serpent had
elevated positions before and after the Fall, Cain still retained some respect towards (his adopted father)
Adam. According to pagan and Christian traditions alike, Adam loved and cared for Cain, even after the
murder of Abel. He even tried to give Cain “going-away” supplies when God banished him to the land of
Nod. Adam was knowledgeable, and, as the “father” of many people and things in the early days, he had
all of the best intentions of the world.
Most of the other pagans around at the time, however, considered Adam to be a little bit misguided (as
we’ve seen in the story of Adapa). Adam still tried to follow the God of the Bible, even though he messed
up with that, even. This was why Cain “allowed” Adam to maintain some honor and dignity in their new
religion, and continued in his plans to turn him into a “god,” too.

And, although it wasn’t Cain’s direct goal to make
himself a god, the deed was indirectly done for him by
his peers. He would soon be looked as
above them all; supposedly “given” this rank by the Serpent:

…Enlil (the Serpent)… had given the lordship over mankind upon earth to Marduk (Cain), victorious son
of Ea (Eve)…
                                                                                   (Pinches, 1903, p. 103)[194]

                               …all earlier gods were demoted so that he got all of the glory.
                                         ("Ancient Near East (Babylonia) Glossary", n. d., p. 17)[195]

Its interesting how one ancient source stated that Cain’s “… appearance was after Bel, and in the likeness
of Anu.”[196] Now, we’re beginning to see why Cain, Adam, and the Serpent were so closely
associated,
one with another, and often confused. Cain was now equated, in ways, to, both, his father and step-father.
With the expanding pagan religion, Cain began to overshadow them all.[197] As we know, Cain and the
Serpent were thought of so closely that they were even known by, practically, the same name:[198]

Bel (the Serpent) was known as… the "older Bel" (lord), to distinguish him from Bel-Merodach of Babylon.
                                                                          (Mackenzie, 1915, p. 35)[199]

Cain (Marduk) would become the new protagonist of the gods, and over all the “evil” things brought to
this planet (i.e. the former judgments of God).[200] Instead of the Serpent, Cain became
accredited for
“uncorrupting” their world at hand.
Babylonian god(s):
- (the Babylonian) Merodach
- (the Babylonian) Marduk

Common characteristics of these gods:
- The name Merodach, over time, was shortened to Amaruduk (i.e. Mar-
 duk), meaning “young steer of day.”[158]
-
Merodach (or Marduk) was considered the firstborn son of Ea/Enki.[159]
-
“The features of Marduk’s face were said to had “[shone like] the day.”[160]
-
Note the following ancient text, the Enuma Elish:
     90 Ea declared Marduk flawless
     104 (Ea speaking) ”… My son, who is my Sun!
     105 Sun for all the Heavens!”[161]
-
The god Bel was thought to be a favorite god of Merodach.[162]
-
In fact, Merodach was even considered "son of Bel." The two (Merodach
 and Bel) were so close, in many ways. To separate them, Merodach was
 even known as Bel-Merodach (the “younger” Bel).[163]
-
There was, apparently, a great deal of seasonal flooding in ancient Baby-
 lonia. Merodach/Marduk was the one who “brought order out of chaos.”
 One way he did this was to build dikes and drainage canals,
 separating the waters from the land. Marduk was also known as the
 “donor of fruitfulness and founder of agriculture…”[164] Through this
 feat, he founded homes for men. This diverting of water, over a long
 enough period of time, allowed people in this immediate area to build
 more permanent cities.[165]
-
Marduk built at least five cities.[166] He eventually founded the city of
 Babylon, and became the national god of Babylonia.[167]
-
He became so popular to others around him that, “all nature, including
 man, owed its existence to him; the destiny of kingdoms and subjects
 was in his hands.”[168]

(“Looking at the word Sar (from Sar-gon) and we see it can mean ‘king.’”[151] Add the word gon, which
can mean ‘Cain,’ and we have Sar-gon: ‘King-Cain.’[152
] Sargon was said to have lived around 3800-
4000 B.C.; approximately the same time Cain was thought to have lived.[153
] Cain, as we theorized,
was probably the son of the Serpent. “The basis root of the name Akki is found in the Hebrew
Nachash."[154] As already stated, Nachash was the Hebrew word used for “Serpent” in Genesis
3:1.[155] Cain was also a gardener, and had superhuman knowledge.[156] Christian tradition and the
Bible both tell us that he built cities, notably Enoch (or Erech?). Cain easily could have been the first
“priest” of pagan thought and ideology.)

Here are some excerpts from the ancient text, “Legend of Sargon”:
2 My mother was lowly…
5 My lowly mother conceived me, in secret she brought me forth.
8 Akki, the irrigator, it carried me.
9 Akki, the irrigator, with… lifted me out,
10 Akki, the irrigator, as his own son… reared me,
11 Akki, the irrigator, as his gardener appointed me.
12 While I was a gardener the goddess Ishtar (Eve) loved me,
13 And for… years I ruled the kingdom.[157]

It’s interesting to see how the above could apply, quite easily, to Cain.


Babylonian god(s):
- (the Akkadian) Sargon

Common characteristics of this god:
- Sargon (Sar-gon) was famous throughout ancient Babylonia. In one
 ancient text, Sargon called his adopted father Akki.[139]
-
Another ancient Akkadian inscription lists Sargon as the "son of
 Bel."[140]
-
It’s only natural to assume Akki could be close to Bel, if not the same
 god. It’s also natural to assume the famous Akki was a king of the
 ancient Babylonian city of Akkad, if not the founder. Sargon was
 said to have been raised by Akki as a gardener.[141]
-
According to one source, Sargon claimed Akki, “trained me to become
 his assistance in the royal gardens.”[142]
-
Sargon was also said to have “cleaned out and cut out new canals
 and brought the system of irrigation to a high degree of
 efficiency.”[143]
-
Apparently, Sargon had great intellectual abilities. As well as gaining
 knowledge from Akki, “Sargon’s super-human knowledge were
 attributed to his mother's teaching.”[144]
-
He transplanted some of this knowledge into completing other tasks
 and accomplishments: “His career began with the conquest of
 Erech. Erech was called ‘the old city’ or ‘place of the settle-
 ment.’”[145]
-
Sargon also “founded the city of Babylon” and was “one of the great-
 est in the long line of Babylonian monarchs.”[146]
-
The city of Babylon “became the metropolis and, at the same time,
 the centre of Western Asiatic civilization.”[147]
-
Sargon was easily “one of the earliest of the world's great empire
 builders.”[148]
-
The early beliefs of ancient times were, obviously, monotheistic.
 Around the time of Sargon, however, it changed; another religious
 belief was blooming, now becoming polytheistic in nature.[149]
-
Sargon was also considered a priest, or the first high priest, of the
 religion.[150]

(Isn’t it interesting to note that earlier gods and goddesses with the same attributes were replaced by
this female goddess – Ishtar?[133] In one ancient Babylonian work, known as the Penitential Hymn,
the name Ishtar could have been derived from an ancient Hebrew word for “woman” (or Adam’s wife):
Ish.[134]
We know that earth and water were symbols of the pagan “Eve.” We will soon see how Eve, eventually,
would become more and more associated with the Serpent; even considered his “daughter.” This was
probably because she took of the fruit of the Tree of Knowledge, disobeyed God, and, during times of her
life, followed another “way.” Because of this, she was probably considered a spiritual “daughter” of the
Serpent. Eve also loved Abel, and vehemently mourned the death of her son.)


It only makes sense to assume Ea-Oannes, Ki (Enki), and Ishtar might have originally been one in the
same, and originally been of the same sex. But, how and why would
Eve, beyond the taking the fruit of
Knowledge, begin to follow the “ways” of the Serpent? Wasn’t she Adam’s husband? She seemed on the
side of God, at least in the Bible.
There are a number of things she may have done, beyond the fornication of the Garden, beyond eating the
forbidden fruit. According to a number of Christian traditions (even the Bible), she separated from Adam for
at least 130 years. Where did she go? How did she survive in our cold, cruel world, all alone? We shall
see that pagan mythology seems to have a great deal more about Eve after the fall, and what she did. The
pagan religion, interestingly, would put her on a pedestal (along with the Serpent) at times, as we’ll see.
Along these same lines, according to pagan thought, Adam did have some relevance to their beliefs; after
all, he was once the great “father” of so many people. He at least tried to do what was right (or, he thought
he did). Pagan ideology did give him
some credit for the efforts he made, but that was about it. Over time,
they began to transform him into somewhat of a loner. He
was important for some period in their beliefs,
yes, but not that much, anymore. With inherent weaknesses and problems, the sun god
Adam did have
contributions to pagan mythology; but, like the family member who has somehow “lost his way,” Adam
wasn’t given too much validation for his knowledge and hierarchy, as Eve and the Serpent were.

The Baker Adapa (Adam) Does what he was told

Let’s look at an example of how Adam was probably looked upon, how it was he who was held respon-
sible for a problem he supposedly caused (by some internal weakness); as well as how
he had to be “put
in his place” for a detrimental act he brought upon society. The following ancient mythological account
seems to be the pagan view of the
Fall of Adam and Eve, along with their “twists.”

Adapa was a mortal man from a godly lineage. He was given super intelligence by Ea (or Enki), the
god of wisdom. In spite of the possession of all this wisdom Adapa was denied immortality, however.
One day, he lost his temper and broke the wings of Ninlil (another avatar of Eve) the South Wind,
who had overturned his fishing boat, and was called to account before a god in heaven. Ea, his
patron god, warned him to apologize humbly for his actions, but not to partake of food or drink while
he was in heaven, as it would be the food of death. The god, impressed by Adapa's sincerity, offered
instead the food of immortality; but Adapa heeded Ea's advice, refused, and thus missed the chance
for immortality that would have been his.
                                                 ("Adapa", n. d., p. 1)[135]

If we compare this to the story of the Biblical Fall, we get some interesting twists: first, in the Bible, it was
Eve who chooses the fruit, and picks knowledge over eternal life. She seduces her husband, and, through
his love for her, he chooses the fruit, also. They both end up mortal. In the pagan account, however, it is
up to Adam (Adapa) to choose what will be brought to mankind. He was already given divine knowledge
by the woman Eve (Ea). Obviously, he upset one of her avatars (i.e. Ninlil) in some way, and needed to
account for his abuse. The god who heard earthly Adam’s case, however, felt for Adam’s sincerity, and
decided to forgive him. He even offered him the food of immortality, but Adam followed the divine knowl-
edge of Eve, and missed his own chance for something better. He messed up, and affected all of
mankind with this choice.
For whatever reason, he didn't want to be immortal, or Eve didn’t want this mortal to advance to a higher,
immortal state. Whatever the deeper reason, it seems that, regardless of his obedience to Eve, regardless
of what path he chose, it was
Adam’s error which brought blame to mankind. It was Adam who deprived
himself, and the entire human race, of immortality, through one wrong choice!

Adapa… was already endowed with knowledge and wisdom, and failed of immortality, not because he
was disobedient, like Adam, but through his literal obedience to Ea, his creator.
                                                                                (Rogers, 1912, p. 69)[136]

Adam obeyed his superior, Eve. The human race did get knowledge, but could not have both. Eve, as we
notice, seemed to have escaped any responsibility. Yes, this was what was probably meant, before, about
the errors of Adam: the “…ill he has brought upon mankind… [And] the disease that he brought upon the
bodies of men.” The curse of the world seems to be the result of Adam’s misconduct; not Eve
; not the
Serpent.

…Adapa was deprived of eternal life by not eating or drinking the ‘food or water of life’ while Adam was
cut off from eating the fruit of the ‘tree of life’…
                                                     ("In Search of Historical Adam: Part 2", n. d., p. 2)[137]

It’s clear to see: twists abound in Babylonian mythology. It’s almost inconceivable, however, not to think
there were
some connections between pagan gods and goddesses and Adam, Eve, Abel, and the Serpent;
as well, a common place of origin for them all: the Garden of Eden!
Now that we’ve looked at how the story of Adam and the Fall were manipulated, as well as some of the
ways Eve and the Serpent were elevated, what about the infamous Cain? What contributions did he have
to early pagan thought and mythology? As already stated, Cain who would be the one who became very
powerful: the ‘designer’ of much pagan thought:

Although modern scholars seem to ignore the possibility that Cain may have influenced the history of
the ancient world, three notable writers at the beginning of the Christian era (St. Jude, Josephus and
Philo) suggested that Cain's influence was evil and enduring…
                  (Bristowe, 1927, p. 4)[138]

Let’s look at some of the more popular pagan avatars of
Cain:
Babylonian god(desses):
- (the Akkadian) Ishtar
- (the Sumerian) Inanna

Common characteristics of these goddesses:
- The goddess Inanna was also an “earth-goddess,” who provided
 life and sustenance to the land, as well as restored life and
 fertility to all.[125]
-
Interestingly enough, Ishtar was also known as “Lady of the
 Deep.”[126]
-
She was known as a fish, or snake, goddess.[127]
-
Ishtar was considered daughter of the moon god Nanna (or Sin);
 other traditions held her to be daughter of An.[128]
-
In some myths, Anu's consort was known as Antum or Antu, a
 goddess… “often confused with Ishtar (or Inanna),” or, even
 replaced by Ishtar.[129]
-
Legends of an early form of the god Ea are exactly the same as
 later legends of Ishtar; she does seem to be connected with
 Ea in a number of ways.[130]
-
Ishtar, herself, was later replaced by more goddesses in up-
 and-coming empires, such as the West Semitic Astarte, the
 Greek Aphrodite, and the Roman Venus.[131]
-
Ishtar also loved the murdered god Dumuzi.[132]
(We recall the priests and scribes of Ur and early Babylonia may have, either intentionally or
unintentionally, twisted these early stories, in order to accentuate their own beliefs. We may be able to
see that in the above example. Somehow, the early goddess Ki was a female (the wife of An), but, in
her transformation to the god En-ki, she was turned into a male. No exact reason as to why; maybe the
result of early, male-dominated societies. A male deity in a commanding role may have sounded more
appropriate to the ancient priests, here. Whatever politically incorrect reason, we now can see that
because one deity was female and another closely-related deity was male doesn’t mean they could not
have been the same person! Please note, also, how close the god Enki and goddess Ninlil are, in the
above.
Her position in the Garden probably allowed her to oversee and manage projects within the Garden,
such as the irrigation and watering of crops. Eve, like Enki, was also thought to be “firstborn” of Adam,
in a way, because she was created “from his rib.” Eve was also known for her wisdom.)
Babylonian god(desses):
- (the Sumerian) Enki[116]
-
(the Sumerian) Ninlil

Common characteristics of these god(desses):
- The god Enki (En-ki) comes from En - "lord" and ki - "earth;" to
 mean, literally, "Lord of the Earth" or “Lord Earth.”[117]
-
The goddess Ki seemed to be refashioned into En-ki, a god
 who “made for the essentials of agriculture.”[118]
-
With the god Enlil, Enki helped to increase the abundance
 of the land.[119]
-
Enki was also considered “operations manager” to other people
 around him.[120]
-
The goddess Ninlil was known as “Lady of Cultivation” (inter-
 estingly enough, Enlil, the “Lord of Cultivation,” was her
 husband), and was also equated with the goddess Ninkharsag,
 or “Lady of Kharsag” (of which Kharsag was probably equated
 to the area of Eden).[121]
-
Along with Enlil, Ninlil was considered the “Lady of the
 Command.”[122]
-
Enki was also thought to be “Lord of What is Beneath (or, the
 underworld);” again, this was probably because he had
 dominion, not only over the terrestrial earth, but also over
 the supernatural waters on the earth, and below.[123]
-
Enki was also considered the firstborn son of An; and was a
 god of wisdom.[124]
(Assuming An (or Anu) was Adam, we know his wife was Eve. In regards to her association with the
“earth goddess,” we know that paganism considered Eve’s rule, or domain, over the supernatural “waters”
on, and below, the earth (i.e. the underworld), in opposition to Adam’s domain, which was “above the
earth” or “in the heavens” (because his soul came from heaven).[115] Adam and Eve were progenitors of
many people, as well as over the ways of God they promoted. Eve could easily be considered a great
“mother” because of this. This time, we see the deity was a woman, with similar attributes. We’ll now
see how this goddess soon would be changed into a male, as well.)

Babylonian god(dess):
- (the Sumerian) Ki

Common characteristics of this goddess:
- Anu’s wife was known to be Ki.[111]
-
As “Goddess of the Earth,” Ki was likely the
 original name of the earth goddess![112]
-
It is likely she and An (Anu) were progenitors of
 most gods.[113]
- Naturally, because of this, Ki was known as the
 great “mother.”[114]

(Interesting, the word Ea is close to the Hebrew Hea or Hevel – the Jewish name for Eve![109] The
association of a god or goddess with water could have a number of reasons, as we’ve seen. For one, it
was probably a symbol of Eve’s occupation in the Garden of Eden: Eve was responsible for leading
irrigation projects and other waterworks throughout the time Adam managed the Garden, and even
beyond. Beyond her occupation, we know water could also be symbolic of the supernatural or spiritual
world - the waters beneath the earth (i.e. the “Deep”). In paganism, Eve was granted rule over these
areas of the cosmos.
As already stated, our bodies are made up, mostly, of water. The pagan “Eve” would become associated
with water, possibly, for another reason: water, in the supernatural sense, could also symbolize human
thought and emotions. Eve was very distraught and emotional about her son Abel’s death. She severely
lamented his murder – this could, possibly, be why she was said to have “gone down to the underworld.”
She probably felt as though she was going through an earthly “hell,” of sorts, during this time. Just as
the full moon controls the tides of the oceans, could there (at least in the supernatural realm) be some
way for these “waters” of the human mind to be made relevant, to be influenced; even manipulated?
Through the eating of the fruit of the Tree of Knowledge, Eve was said to have gained a great amount of
wisdom – spiritual wisdom (in her mind). With all of this knowledge, Eve would, at least some time
during her life, fall under domain of the Serpent’s influence (according to these pagan mythologies).
As one may have noticed, as well, the two above gods – Oannes and Ea – were male. Ea, however,
could be considered a male in some legends and a female in others.[110] The exact gender of these
ancient gods and goddesses could, over time (and possible manipulation), have been blurred, as we’ll
see, below.)
Babylonian god(desses):
- (the Akkadian) Oannes or Ea-Oannes
- (the Akkadian) Ea[103]

Common characteristics of these gods:
- The god Oannes was associated with water; and was often port-
 rayed as a fish.[104]
-
He was endowed with reason, and taught mankind wisdom.[105]
-
This god could also be known in a combination of names:
 Ea-Oannes.[106]
-
The god Ea, “whose abode is water,” was also known as “God
 of the Deep.”[107]
-
He lived in the area of Eridu, and was considered “the source of
 Babylonian civilization” and the “bearer of culture.”[108]
                                                                         …Ba’al is the all-devouring Sun…[97]


Another
sun was about to come to "light." Adam was the pagan sun, as least from what we originally
thought. Now, we see the Serpent (a.k.a.
Ba’al) would also be known as the sun. As mentioned, the
Serpent would soon, in the minds of many, take over Adam's reign; not only taking over Adam’s popularity,
but taking over
him, in most every way!
In one example, the ancient Babylonian god,
Ninib, was known to be associated with the sun. He was a:

…deity originally with solar attributes… (and) closely associated with Bel and regarded as his son…
In hymns he is described as a healing god who releases men from illness… (the) aspect stressed was
the sun at the morning… showering beneficence upon mankind. In theogony, Ninib was regent of
the planet Saturn.
                          ("Ancient Near East (Babylonia) Glossary and Texts", n. d., p. 39)[98]

On the surface, Ninib seems to be another Babylonian god equated with Adam. We see, though, the
above Ninib was considered son of the real powerhouse – or, the real lord over everything: Bel (i.e. the
Serpent). The word
regent, in the above, is “a person who exercises the ruling power in a kingdom during
the minority, absence, or disability of the sovereign.” In other words, pagan mythology would eventually
fashion Adam into a god who, at best, was a regent of this now-elevated Serpent. The god
Saturn, in the
above example, was known as “the hidden god,” in ancient lore. Why? Doesn’t this sound familiar!

As the inner nature of YHVH (the God of the Bible) is hidden; therefore He (YHVH) is only named with
the ‘Name of the Shekhinah, Adonai, i.e., Lord…’ Zohar iii 320a...
                        ("Ancient Near East (Babylonia) Glossary and Texts", n. d., p. 3)[99]

We see that Biblical tradition also states that God is a God of mysteries; meaning there are elements to
Him which are supposed to be hidden to us. We are not supposed to know everything about our world.
This is also how the ancient pagans probably manipulated their introduction of this Serpent worship. Their
god had many similarities to Adam, and, eventually, the Serpent would replace him. The “ways” of
paganism would replace Adam’s “ways.” The original sun god of paganism (Adam) would rightly, and
mysteriously, take his place behind the new, spiritual “sun” god of the faith. This was just a way to hijack
a typical seeker from the true ways of God, and His regent – Adam, and was one of the many mysteries of
this ancient pagan religion.[100] The new apostate faith of Cain and the Serpent would eventually become
attractive for pagans and non-pagans alike. Every disgruntled person who may become turned off of
following Adam and God was now ripe for the taking. Their new “ways” were the ones which would
actually heal mankind from the “illnesses” and “diseases” that the God of Adam brought to the world. One
interesting characteristic of Babylonian gods such as
Utu or Shamash (a.k.a. Adam) was that they were
both considered a “son of Sin.”[101] Again, Adam was now considered a spiritual “son” of the Serpent! His
“ways” were what they were, but needed
tweaking. The Serpent would now take over as proper sun god,
and so it remains to this day.
There is more to early pagan “gods” and “goddesses.” Let’s look at a few of the more probable equivalents
of the ancient
Eve. She, believe it or not, had a good deal of relevance, and reverence, in early pagan
thought.

At Babylon there was (in these times) a great resort of people of various nations, who inhabited Chaldea,
and lived without rule and order, like the beasts of the field. In the first year there made its appearance…
an animal endowed with reason, who was called Oannes.
                         ("Ancient Near East (Babylonia) Glossary and Texts", n. d., p. 42)[102]

According to Berossus, there was a wise deity who brought mankind wisdom…
(Again, we know the Serpent was ‘chief,’ or ‘lord,’ over many others in the Garden (except Adam). It’s
interesting to see how this god was so often considered a serpent or dragon (which, incidentally, was
only represented as a “fiery serpent”)!)


We, now, are beginning to see how the original position of Adam, his wisdom, and his divinely-appointed
hold over the entire civilized world at the time was slowly being overshadowed by the Serpent, and his
pagan “ways.”


Adam: New Regent of the Serpent

In the above, we’ve been introduced to a famous pagan “god,” known throughout the Bible (e.g. Num.
22:41, Judg. 2:13, I Kings. 22:53, etc.):


Babylonian god(s):
- (the Akkadian) Bel
- (the Semitic) Ba’al

Common characteristics of these gods:
- The title Bel (or Ba’al) simply means “Lord.”[91]
-
Bel, quite often, was equated with the aforementioned Enlil.[92]
-
Like Enlil, Bel was also known as “Lord of the Lands.”[93]
-
The word Bel can also mean chief, as in “Chief of the Gods.”[94]
-
The ancient Greek scholar Hesychius considered him, “a
 dragon or great serpent.”[95]
-
In fact, Bel was widely known to be a dragon.[96]

(It seems the name Sin seems more of a spiritual title for the Serpent; and, because of the seduction of
Ninlil and Ishtar (of who, as we’ll see, both were probably equated with Eve), the story could also be
related with Eve’s temptation in the Garden. Naturally, pagan thought most probably imparted that Eve,
naturally, had welcomed the Serpent’s advances, over time.
What was “born” of their copulation, in the Garden, was this spiritual avatar of the Serpent - a god. We
know Eve received knowledge at this time. The seduction of Eve could have even marked the birth of
the pagan religion – the beginnings of “divine knowledge” that the human Eve acquired after eating fruit
of the Tree of Knowledge.
Note that the Serpent, in his new spiritual avatar Sin (the “god” born of this experience) was known as
the “Lord of Knowledge.” Sin helped to administer knowledge and power to Eve, and, through her, to the
rest of humanity (via the pagan religion).)


Babylonian god(s):
- (the Akkadian) Sin or Suen
- (the Sumerian) Nanna or Nannar

Common characteristics of these gods:
- Sin the Moon God (as he was so-called) was thought to be
 “born of Enlil.”[86]
-
We can see Enlil was considered Sin’s “father” in the
 following story:
     Sin was the product of Enlil's rape of a goddess named
     Ninlil.[87] Ninlil sometimes was identified with the
     goddess Ishtar.[88] After being seduced by Enlil, she
     eventually began to enjoy her violation as the time went
     on. They continued in their sexual encounter, in spite of
     her pretending to protest it. Thus, through their union, they
     engendered the god Sin (a.k.a. Su-en) or Nanna.
- The god Su-en may be a corruption of Zu-ena:
 “Knowledge-Lord.”[89]
-
Sin was also known to be the father of the sun god
 Shamash (or Utu).[90]

(Interestingly, the Serpent was the “operations manager” of the Garden of Eden, as we know. He led
others by his command. Through this, the Serpent (under Adam, of course) was a major landlord over
the terrestrial earth.)


Babylonian god(s):
- (the Sumerian) Enlil

Common characteristics of this god:
- Enlil (or En-lil) was called “Lord of Lands” or “Lord of the
 Earth."[80]
-
On a cosmic level, the god Enlil's realm was the earth, as well
 as the spheres of winds and weather above it; so, because of
 this, he was also known as “Lord of the Wind (or Air).”[81]
 One interpretation identifies this “wind” the following way:
 “both the strong and gentle winds were symbolic of the breath
 issuing from his mouth, and, eventually, as his word or com-
 mand.”[82] In this case, Enlil was also the “Lord of the
 Command.”[83] What this likely means was that Enlil was
 leader, or chief, over others – he issued commands to a mult-
 itude of individuals.
- Interestingly enough, this god was also known as the “Lord
 of Cultivation."[84]
-
Another source describes Enlil as “splendid serpent of the
 shining eyes.”[85]


(If we were to dig deeper into more of the pagan equivalents of Adam, we would see the Greek Zeus was
considered “offspring of the sky” as well as “father” god.[78] Zeus probably was a later-equivalent of
Adam. According to pagan thought, Zeus (Adam) considered his own son bane (“a cause of harm, ruin,
or death”) and a renegade (“a person who deserts his cause or faith for another; apostate; traitor”).[79]
From this, we, again, discover how the ancient pagans probably twisted the stories of patriarchs such as
Adam and Abel. The ways of God were now considered the “opposition” to what early paganism wanted to
accomplish. If Adam and Abel were to be put in any good light, their “god” avatars needed to be
“paganized,” somewhat.)

We are, hopefully, beginning to understand these two religious “extremes,” and see how differently these
early characters of Genesis were being portrayed. Let’s continue to dig deeper, and see how paganism
further succeeded in their methods of manipulation.

A Tale of Two Fathers

Now, if Cain’s new polytheistic paganism was as “cut and dry” as simply linking pagan names to early
Biblical characters then this whole story would have been unraveled a long time ago, but it isn’t. There
was, as we’ll see, a lot of “smoke and mirrors” to early pagan mythology and religion. Whether through the
passage of time, or even for intentional purposes, these ancient accounts did seem to be obscured. One
thing we do know, however: to introduce alternate beliefs into our world one must confuse those holding
on to present truths. We already know, for example, the pagan gods
An and Shamash were probably
associated with the Biblical
Adam, and we do know that they were both considered “father” gods in early
pagan myths. It seems obvious that Adam should be the only one to fit into this scenario. Simple enough;
but, in reality, it’s not too simple. There are a number of other “gods” which may own up to this same title
as “father,” but aren’t Adam. Why?
First, we must remember the
Serpent lived in the same vicinity of the Garden of Eden. We also know that
pagan ideals paralleled Cain’s “ways,” and not God’s. In order to promote their take on things, they had to
use the old “bait-and-switch” approach. The Serpent was right there, along with Adam, in the Garden of
Eden. He was secondary chief of the great hierarchy over the workers of the Garden. The Serpent also
probably had sexual relations with Eve, just like Adam. Adam and the Serpent, both, were close in these
ways, and both, eventually, began to be thought of as great “fathers.” Adam and the Serpent were both a
“father” over something (or, rather, someone) else: Cain! Adam was his “adopted” father; the Serpent his
probable, real father.

As we’ll see, Cain and the Serpent both helped develop the pagan religion. So, assimilating his own
elements, as becoming another “father,” allowed him to slowly take over Adam’s overall position! The
Serpent, ultimately, would become “supernatural father,” if you will: “father” of their new religious beliefs.
Through this, it became fairly easy for pagan elders to assimilate the two, in many ways. The Serpent, as
“father,” would, soon enough, outrank Adam as “father” over the people, according to pagan thought, to
become one of the principle objects of their worship! When one tries to read these pagan myths without
this knowledge, confusion is a very likely possibility. This discrepancy could make things very hard to place
a “god” with the variety of names out there – again, this is one example of the “smoke and mirrors” which
came from the origins of this mystery religion. This was a way for those in charge to “twist” things around,
and conceal realities inside of what they set out to promote.
With that said and done, let’s look at the other spiritual “father” of ancient paganism - the
Serpent - and
discover some of the first “gods” that he was elevated to.


Greek and Roman god(s):
- (the Greek) Ares
- (the Roman) Mars

Common characteristics of these gods:
- The god Tammuz was also identified with the gods
 Ares and Mars.[75]
-
Homer refers to the youngest son of Zeus as Ares:
 “the bane of mortals.”[76]
-
The god Zeus also referred to his son as a renegade and
 hateful pestilent.[77]

(Abel was a shepherd (in Gen. 4:2). He was also the first person to die in our new world. His death was a
landmarked tragedy – the first to suffer the most despicable act one human being could do to another:
murder! Was his soul also the first in our world to go back into the Abyss? Abel, in some schools of
thought, attempted to be flawless in moral character, much like how Adam attempted to be. He was
probably a direct son of the Serpent, like Cain, of which pagan thought could have considered him
“flawless” for this reason, as well: “flawless” in his bloodline (which was similar to how God called Noah
“perfect in his generations” (Gen. 6:9).
Abel, however, was also looked upon in a negative way, because of his moral character. This could be an
instance of where pagan interpretation may vary in their opinion of a “god.” They may change the morality
and character of a “god” into something of an “opposite” extreme, if need be. He was “flawless” in his
bloodline (because he was a son of the Serpent), but he was “bad” or “rebellious” because he followed
Adam. Eventually, Abel became an “evil” god. This brother of Cain was in an interesting position – on
the same level as Cain, in ways, but, since he followed God and Adam wholeheartedly, he became a
“warrior” for the other side, out to “destroy” Cain’s new world order. Abel also tried to spread Adam’s
cursed ways of “death” to everyone, since the Fall. His own death must have been monumental – an
“achievement” of Cain to be able to stop these potential activities dead in their tracks. Possibly, Abel’s
death was just the “sacrifice” that “needed” to be done, to keep the spirit of Cain’s new pagan religion
alive.)


Babylonian god(s):
- (the Sumerian) Dumuzi
- (the Akkadian) Tammuz

Common characteristics of these gods:
- “… Dumuzi was identified as 'a shepherd' or 'the shepherd.'”[70]
-
“The name Tammuz was the Semitic name for Dumuzi…”[71]
-
The god Dumuzi died in a very famous way. He was considered
 "Lord of the Tree of Life" and "Son of the Abyss: the ever-dying,
 ever-resurrected Sumerian god."[72]
-
In one account, the name Tammuz (a name seemingly based
 on the early Sumerian Damuzid) could also mean “the
 Flawless Young.”[73]
-
In other accounts, Tammuz was considered a “warrior,” a
 “destroying element,” or a “death spreader.”[74]

(Adam, since his creation, was considered the prophet, or priest, of God. He was extremely knowledge-
able and wise (as we recall, he was instrumental in naming all of the animals around him). It’s obvious
he was king of Eden. Adam was also thought of as blameless, and of clean hands (of the sin of forn-
ication in the Garden - of which Eve and the Serpent, on the other hand, were both guilty). He was also
anointed to be the observer of God’s statutes. On the other hand, he did help to usher in an “illness,” a
“disease,” or “sickness” upon mankind, however: the curse of the Fall. Adam could have been a baker of
bread in the area of Eden. The Bible stated that God said to Adam: “In the sweat of thy face shalt thou
eat bread… (Gen. 3:19)!”
[64])

Some more interesting quotes, in regards to this “paganization” of Adam:

- Adam of the Bible and Adapa of Amorite legend were both human sons of God, or a god.[65]

-
The title, ‘the Son of God,’ reserved for Sumerian royalty, is also used for (an ancient god named)
 ‘Adamu.’[66]

-
Could (the pagan “gods”) Alorus, Adapa, Alulim, Adamu, Atum, and Adam be all the same person?
 Perhaps a better question would be, what rationale could be employed to explain away the common-
 alities? At least some of these secular references must pertain to the first man in biblical history.”[67]

Many of these ancient names for a specific “father” god of paganism, and their individual functions, seem
to be so close, one to another…why couldn’t they possibly relate to one individual? Adam was probably
around during this early time. He was famous. He could have easily been a good candidate for this
escalation to “divinity.”

The Shepherd

According to the Babylonian historian Berossus, another god that may relate to Adam – Alorus - was
"appointed by God as the Shepherd of men."[68] This shepherd label does sound familiar, at least in the
Bible. Jesus was “the good Shepherd” (John 10:11, 10:14). Adam, as we see, could easily have been
the “shepherd” of early men. There is another famous “shepherd” in the Bible; one who lived around the
same time as Adam. Could there be pagan connections to this other shepherd, as well? We do know that
Abel was a shepherd. It seems the Biblical Abel also had his place in the pagan/Babylonian plethora of
“gods” and “goddesses.”

                    May not the story of Cain and Abel have given rise to the legend of Tammuz…?
                                                                                      (Pinches, 1903, p. 83)[69]

Let’s look at some of the more probable ancient equivalents of Abel.


Babylonian god(s):
- (the Babylonian) Adapa

Common characteristics of this god:
- Adapa was considered a sage, prophet, or priest in the
 areas of Eridu (i.e. Eden).[59]
-
He was also known as “wisest of men.”[60]
-
Adapa, the “Man of Eridu,” was thought of as ‘blameless,’
 ‘clean of hands,’ and the ‘anointer and observer of laws.’[61]
-
On the other hand, Adapa brought an “ill” upon all
 mankind, and “disease” upon the bodies of men.[62]
-
He was also known for making bread.[63]

(The sun, or sun’s wisdom, can easily be symbolic of Adam. In Luke 3:38, for example, Adam was called
the “son of God;” not in a literal sense, of course (because Jesus would only have that distinction), but in
more of a spiritual sense. He was a ‘son of God’ because he was the one who had his soul directly
breathed into him by his Heavenly Father! This makes him a “son,” in a way. We’ve previously known
that the words “son” and “sun” are close in meaning; often interchanged. Hence, from this, we can con-
clude Adam could have been the pagan interpretation of the “son of the heavens,” “son of God,” or “sun
god.”
The sun, in our natural world, gives off light, and promotes life. Adam, also, provided “light” - spiritual
insight, inspiration, and truth, to those around him. He was very wise and well respected; a judge over
others. After all, he was considered the “father” of many. Just as Jesus was considered “Light of the
World” (John 8:12, 9:5), Adam was also given many of these same honors, early on - according to Christ-
ian (and now pagan) belief. After all, Adam, in Christian and Muslim traditions, was appointed to be
God’s “viceroy” on earth. Jesus was, as well, considered the “last Adam” (I Cor. 15:45).)


Babylonian god(s):
- (the Sumerian) Utu
- (the Sumerian) Ugmash
- (the Akkadian) Shamash

Common characteristics of these gods:
- The names Utu or Ugmash actually were equated with
 the sun, or sun’s wisdom.[56]
-
From Ugmash comes the god Shamash: the sun god.[57]
-
The god Utu was also known as the revealer of light, truth,
 and justice.[58]

(At least some aspect of Adam did come from heaven, or the sky. If we recall, Adam had his soul directly
breathed into him by God Himself (in Gen. 2:7, I Cor. 15:45)! In this respect, Adam was the first who had
something as important as their divine soul come from Heaven, or the sky. Adam also had a shining and
beautiful countenance (before his fall). He was also the “Lord of Plants,” because of his position in the
Garden.
Adam was also known as father, leader, or king of all the pre-Adamite people and terrestrial angels (i.e.
the Nephilim) under him: those who worked in and around the Garden.)

Babylonian god(s):
- (the Akkadian) El
- (the Akkadian) An
- (the Sumerian) Anu
- (the Sumerian) Abu[51]

Common characteristics of these gods:
- The names An or Anu mean "heaven" or "the heavenly one."[52]
-
Anu was known to have had a pleasant countenance.[53]
-
“One meaning of Abu is, ‘Lord of the Plants.’”[54]
-
El, Anu, and Abu were known as a “father” god, or king.[55]

We already know who the first couple was, according to the Bible. Let’s take a look at the more popular,
and probable, ancient pagan equivalents for the first Biblical character of Genesis: Adam.
The Underworld

Beyond the water which may have covered the earth at this time, one needs to go deeper, and look inside
our earth - deep down, beneath the earth’s surface. Was there only rock down there, or could there had
been something of a supernatural significance down there, as well? The word
abyss comes from words that
can mean "bottomless" or "chaos."[33] Most of us have heard of the underworld. The pagan
Hades and
Jewish
Sheol both seem to represent a similar concept; one Greek, the other, Hebrew.[34]

It is especially important to note the close connection of the underworld with the sea, a perfectly
understandable conjunction, for the dark, unseen recesses of the ocean bottom are likely apertures to
Hades, if not the place itself.
                                                                   (Bandy, 1967, p. 47)[35]

(Sheol was…) essentially a place where men were treated according to their deserts, with a division for
the righteous, and a division for the wicked.
                                           (Bandy, 1967, p. 44)[36]

The two, essentially, are almost the same - a "common grave of mankind."[37] For the most part, they, both,
were said to be located in the center of the earth.[38] We’ve also elaborated on this in the
Gap Theory. God
may have destroyed our previous world. Then, He placed the souls of this devastated world into the “holding
area” or “common grave” of the abyss; only to have them come back again, as newborn babes, into our
present world.

…when God imparts the living soul to man, he commits a pre-existent spirit to an existence in the flesh.
                                                                               (Anonymous, 1834, p. 73)[39]

This is not reincarnation (see
Creation - the Gap & Deep), but a different way to look at our human exis-
tence. Pagan theology may hold to the existence of a similar “holding cell,” prison, or underworld for lost
souls, as well. Some ancient sources even referred to this area by the same name as used in Biblical
tradition! One author describes it as follows: deep beneath the earth, in the deepest depths of this
supernatural “sea,” beyond the Abyss, beneath Sheol, is located this area of
Darkness (“which is also
called the bottomless
Deep”).[40] In ancient Babylonian myths and texts, we have:

Bilingual of Creation
8 The Deep had not been made…
10 All lands were sea.[41]

(The historian) Hesoid’s account of creation… begins with Chaos itself, out of which emerged…
Darkness.
                                                                         (Johnson, 2004, p. 202)[42]

There were even gods and goddesses who were associated with this
Deep. The pagan goddess Ishtar,
for example, was known as "Lady of the Deep."[43] Why?

Darkness has been used symbolically of degradation and evil, but that there is an actual place of
darkness where evil spirits are compelled to reside…
                      (Rand, 1948, p. 396)[44]

It’s fairly easy to begin to assume the pagan
Darkness or Deep was, most probably, similar to this
spiritual/supernatural realm of Biblical tradition.

In Babylonian stories, there was sad mixture of animal forms as well as of land and atmosphere, until
some sort of divine wisdom incarnated in a certain god(s) brought order to it all.
                                                                                         (Houston, 1926, 195)[45]

While we’re on this subject, we now need to let the “cat out of the bag,” and discover who the pagan lore
attributed to their “divine wisdom incarnated into a certain god” really was. In reality, it was probably the
Cain of Genesis who was given credit for bringing order out of Chaos – the chaos which was once the old
world! It was Cain who was also given credit for having authority over this
Deep:

The Story of Creation
142 He set himself over against the Deep…
143 And the lord measured the construction of the Deep…[46]

It was Cain, as well, who was given credit for having such wisdom that he put together the pagan religion,
and established who the gods and goddesses of this religion should be!
Cain was also credited for having control over life and death, and over most all the natural and super-
natural elements above, and deep below, our earth. Again, all of this was nothing but a twisted version of
the awesome powers of God over the planet (now transplanted into, none other than, the son of the
Serpent)! Why would pagan thought give so much credit to this man? Why would the ancient Greeks, so
often, exert that
man was the measure of all things, not God? Why would these ancient Greeks, as well as
other ancient writers, often picture their gods and goddesses as human in appearance?[47] This question
is probably skewed towards the obvious: they once
were! Maybe these ancient gods and goddesses
represented famous Greek ancestors – their most ancient and famous relatives of old! Of course, Cain
would fit into this role to a tee: he was a child of Eve. You can’t go much farther back in ancestry than that.
This same practice of ancestor worship was popular in most succeeding empires of the ancients, beginning
in these early days of ancient Babylonia. Seems that most of the information God wanted for Adam, Eve,
and the people of the era was taken over by Cain and his posse, and ‘twisted:’

…those laws were founded upon the original rules of conduct given to Adam… were taken by Cain into
Babylonia and there remodeled to suit his purposes…
                            (Bristowe, 1927, p. 126)[48]

Ancestor Worship

Ancestor worship was, and still is, the staple of ancient pagan religion, and functions as the foundation of
their god and goddess worship. The next, natural question which may arise might be: could the famous
pagan ancestors that were, indeed, turned into gods be the same as the famous ancestors of early
Genesis (i.e. Adam, Eve, Abel, Cain, etc.)? We will see that, over time, the worship of the original Genesis
characters probably
did morph its way into a sophisticated form of ancestor worship – at least as far as
paganism is concerned; and, thanks to Cain, they were turned into the first polytheistic “gods.”[49]
For the sake of understanding, let’s try to proceed with the assumption that the following pagan gods and
goddess to be detailed were the ancient matriarchs and patriarchs of Genesis. By looking at the details of
these gods, while maintaining this mindset, we should easily be able to piece together some solid simil-
arities! At least, the probability will come to mind that there has to be something to it all.
The more we read, the more things will come to light. If we take on the assumption these pagan gods
could very well be Biblical characters, we’ll get a grasp at how the real story probably went. As well, we’ll
see how Cain was given the credit for elevating those close to him into “gods.” This included Adam, his
mother Eve, and none other than his probable father - the Serpent of the Garden of Eden! Let’s continue
with a number of the most popular gods of ancient Babylonia, and compare them to early Biblical
personalities. We need to start at the very beginning, because:

                                                The first couple advances to the forefront of gods…
                                                                             (Johnson, 2004, p. 11)[50]
A Confusing Mythology of Old?

If we look at most of the pagan or secular-leaning mythologies of today, most seem to be a conglomerate of
unrelated, insensible accounts. These scattered piece works of gods and goddesses often appear to be
strewn together in any old way. Most see our modern mythology books as a collection of discombobulated,
spotted information, at best: god “A” mates with goddess “B”; god “C” kills goddess “D”; god “E” eats his
own children, etc. Why is it this way? In this website, we will try to put much of it together, and explain it in
such a way so that the reader can actually make sense of some of it; also, to show how much of it might
actually relate to the Bible! Even if these two sides (the pagan and the Biblical) might take the reader
towards an opposite moral or religious direction, that doesn’t mean they both didn’t come from the same
source!

…the knowledge imparted to man in the beginning has come down in two streams, on one hand through
the Hebrews, and on the other through the Babylonians.
                             (Bristowe, 1927, p. 20)[16]

Those who insist on saying “all religions are the same” are most probably correct… almost. There are still
others who say, “the faiths of the world all point towards God; it’s just a God in many different forms."
Again, they are probably correct… almost. It seems that most religious theologies do point towards one
god, but, as we’ll see, it’s not the God of the Bible. When we look at what the Bible really has to say and
compare it to what the rest of the many pagan-influenced beliefs really have to say, we will see how the
morality which stems from the Bible is in a class all by itself. How, then, did paganism spread so easily -
one might ask? Who was responsible for so much of its development? We will see now; the cat is now
“out of the bag.”
Yes, it was the
Cain of Genesis who was probably responsible for building a number of ancient Babylonian
cities, as well as ruling over them. Cain did a lot to spread the ancient religious beliefs of paganism to
others around him. He helped to develop polytheism in the pre-flood world, and bring these new ideals to
the masses. There were two “ways,” or “cultures,” which began to take hold after the Fall of Adam: one
stemmed from the people who followed the ways of God (via Adam); the other the people who followed
the “ways” of Cain:[17]

Two of the most recent writers upon the Babylonian inscriptions unintentionally support Professor Kittel's
opinion that the Genesis stories came down in ‘two streams,’ and also my theory that one stream came
down through the descendants of Seth (via Adam) and the other through Cain in Babylonia (via the
Serpent).
                                                                         (Bristowe, 1927, p. 14)[18]

If so many people began to adopt the pagan “ways” of Cain, it leads one to wonder: why did so many
people easily turn away from the God of the Bible? Was Adam that hard of a leader to work under? Again,
we know Cain was the “son of perdition,” and we know who Cain’s real father probably was:
the Serpent.
This Serpent was against Adam, God, and the Bible from the beginning. God stated that there would be
enmity between the seeds of Adam and seeds of the Serpent! Cain was not only the Serpent’s son, but, as
we’ll see, he became his partner! The Serpent had many followers, even had descendants, by the time of
Cain’s death. A vast majority of them began to follow the “ways of Cain;” that’s why there was so much
dissention against Adam, and the ways of God, early on.
We mustn’t forget the motivations behind most of these ancient pagan writers: most of the “meat” behind
their works actually came from the inspirations of fallen, terrestrial angels, of Cain, and, of course, the
Serpent himself. Similar to those who follow the Bible, it’s pretty obvious those who wrote with a pagan
slant probably wanted to promote their writings with their own best interests in mind.
It is notable to discover how early Greek poets and artists, for example, probably told the same stories as in
early Genesis, only from an opposite viewpoint![19] If we look at the Garden of Eden story, for example, a
typical Greek account would conclude that the Serpent did not seduce Adam and Eve, and help sentence
them to an unenlightened state; but, in quite the opposite moral extreme – he enlightened them!

(An early group of Gnostics would)… attribute all wisdom to the serpent of Paradise, and say that he
was the author of knowledge of men.
                                                       (Gardiner, 2006, p. 10)[20]

Cain was also said to have set up priests, in the Babylonian city of Ur, to administrate his new religion.
Again, this led the opportunity for these historical accounts to be further manipulated. The acceptance
of what was “politically correct” in those days often was confined entirely to these early scribes and
priests.[21] These priests were well able to muddle things somewhat in their legends, if need be.[22]
They wanted it all to fit in with their own interpretation on what they believed it all
should be. By the time
the priests got through with the real stories of the Bible, they were turned into a “garbled, yet still some-
what recognizable form of early Genesis.”[23] Even though these stories were, obviously, changed around,
and even though they may try to bring the reader towards some opposing moral conclusion, they can
provide a good deal of substance for our discussion of
Mystery Babylon. Why?

Though, on one hand, Greek idol-worship contradicts the teaching of the Word of God, on the other, if
properly understood, it reinforces the truth of the Scriptures.
                    (Johnson, 2004, p. 9)[24]

As we progress, we will notice a number of similarities between these pagan mythological stories and the
Bible, at least in ways it can pertain to this website. Once we understand the (most probable) identity of
these pagan ancestral gods and goddesses (as well as their motivations) it helps us to learn a great deal
more about these early characters of Genesis than we’ve ever known.[25] One thing we may need to do is
to read these mythological accounts with the knowledge that they will probably try to promote an opposite
moral viewpoint to the reader, and to overlook this. Once we keep this protocol in mind, the similarities
they have to the Bible will almost become crystal clear. It will be amazing to see how pagan/Babylonian
mythologies could actually reinforce and strengthen the Bible, and Biblical traditions, in so many ways.

What the Greeks meant to be an unparalleled, intricately chiseled monument to the glory of mankind
turns out to be a detailed history of mankin’d delusion, and a clear-cut validation of the truth of the Word
of God.
                                                                   (Johnson, 2004, p. 258)[26]

Moving forward, we’ve already understood, from
Creation - the Gap & Deep, some of the more “Biblical”
concepts of the
Gap Theory, the Darkness, and Deep. Believe it or not, if we look deeper into these
pagan mythologies, we discover much of the same; and can learn more about these topics than we may
have ever dreamed. Let’s take a look at the pagan view of these above concepts, from their own
mythological accounts or perspectives.[27]

The Chaldean Account of the Deluge
116 …‘I have begotten man and let him not
117 like the sons of the fishes fill the sea.’[28]

In
Creation - the Gap & Deep, we’ve understood how water had a great deal of significance throughout our
ancient world: water was used to destroy the world before Adam; it almost destroyed the world of Noah’s
day, etc. Water is necessary for life. Our bodies (and our brains) are, as well, made up mostly of water.
Some of these significances also seem to pass into the supernatural (or spiritual) realm!
In regards to the above topics, these other supernatural characteristics need to be accounted for, as well;
first, in Biblical tradition, now in pagan mythology. It seems the ancients, whatever their religious leaning,
had full knowledge of the supernatural significances of water, and inserted them into their own mythological
stories and histories.

The idea is that ‘where a god dies, that is, ceases to exist in human form, his life passes into the waters
where he is buried; and this again is merely a theory to bring the divine water or the divine fish into
harmony with anthropomorphic ideas. The same thing was sometimes effected in another way by saying
that the anthropomorphic deity was born from the water, as Aphrodite sprang from sea foam…’
                                                                         (Mackenzie, 1915, p. 28)[29]

Along the same line, we know (from
Creation - the Gap & Deep) there can also be a spiritual “sea” - an
infinite, supernatural “sea” of space within our own, natural world, beyond your everyday sea of water.
Simply put, when the ancients talked about the “sea,” or something related to “water,” the chances may be
good that they often could be referring to something in the supernatural, or spiritual, world. Let’s begin to
look at how pagan mythologies could have utilized these same ideals.
First, the ancient pagan historian Hesoid stated that the early world was in “… Chaos, an unformed and
confused bulk.”[30] Speaking of this
chaos, we know that the world before Adam, in the Bible, was also a
watery
chaos - a time of utter destruction and ruin. It’s interesting to know that “just as in the Creation
story of the Bible, the Babylonian ‘creator’ also caused dry land to appear, and brought the world back from
a watery chaos.”[31] Ancient Greek and Roman mythology also stated much of the same thing: the
universe sprang from Chaos.[32] We’ll soon see that, according to pagan mythology, something with
supernatural might was responsible for bringing our world to this state of chaos.