These mental elements, or “Mystery” side of Mystery Babylon, will broaden with a look at Cain. We begin
with a deeper examination of this Biblical character, discovering even
more about what might have went on
inside his head, what happened to his brother Abel, and how
Mystery Babylon began to develop! There is
so much more ancient information about Cain than there was about the Serpent. The examination of this
direct Serpent-seed gives us so much more information towards unraveling the mindsets behind
Mystery
Babylon
, and what would form its foundation. After all, "like father, like son."

It's A New (& Cursed) World

Time for Adam and Eve to leave the Garden; to experience night for the first time; to experience cold; to
experience the planet’s newly-found “law of the jungle.” Humans and angels alike would lose most of their
“sun-like” shine, or heavenly countenance, over time.

Adam, now, was forced to do what he feared most: work the fields for his sustenance; work in a world with
so many new adversities. “Necessity compelled them to agriculture; the virtues of their former garden
disappeared.”[1] Now, the use of agriculture seemed to be an unavoidable part of God’s curse on the
earth - no longer could they consume the large, nutritious fruits of the Garden.[2]

Need For Sacrifice

Adam was also the first to be obligated to provide continual, blood sacrifices to God.[3] It was a new
“necessity” of life, with Adam being the first priest.[4] These new sacrifices were to become a symbol of his
newfound faith.[5] Back then, it seemed that Adam’s first choice of animal for this sacrifice would become a
bull, or ox.[6] It also seems fairly obvious that this wasn’t a heart-warming task: to kill an animal, and spill
its blood.
Adam and Eve quickly began to dream of any way they could “earn” their way back into the Garden, without
having to do things such as this. They knew the prophecy of Genesis 3:15: a “redeemer,” or someone born
of Eve’s seed, would bring their souls back toward this closeness with God again; a seemingly-
perfect
state like they had in the Garden. They just did not know who this child would be, or when he would be
born. Maybe, if they could continue to have children they might receive the redeemer
soon, and the curse
would be over.

Bringing Forth The 'Promised Child'

    The first pair, since, as this report of what
    God had decreed, had spread, the chief desire
    Was to increase…
    But longing still for Eden, they were seized
    With a desire to populate the earth.
    That bliss might sooner come, so that it was
    Fulfilled that in the curse had been pronounced,
    Namely, the multiplying of conceptions…
                              (Phifer, 1890, p. 154)[7]

Adam and Eve may have begun to have this (misguided) idea that having as many children as they could,
one after another, might actually help them in the long run. Their “multiplying of conceptions” - of which God
decreed as a curse to Eve - could, at least in their mind, save them from their desperate life. They both
continually felt a great deal of sorrow, and couldn’t wait for either themselves or their descendants to be
blessed with bearing the “promised one.”

There was a blockade to this goal, however, “right out of the starting gate” - something of which they could
not do anything about,
now. It was coming. There was a growing bump in the middle of Eve’s navel. Her
entire body was changing; her stomach was getting large. She was beginning to get really scared. She didn’t
understand how it was to be pregnant.
At least with a rudimentary knowledge of sex, however, she probably couldn’t help but think the Serpent was
the father. The Serpent helped to change the world in so many ways already, and, again, he was doing it –
and it wasn’t for good.

It was around this same time that Adam probably noticed something about Eve, as well. There was at least
one offspring in her womb. Adam realized, or
knew, something was going on inside of her! Many hard lined
Bible interpreters would hold fast that this first child born of Eve (in Gen. 4:1) was actually Adam’s son,
because the English read that Adam
knew his wife: had sex with her. True, that is one meaning of knew, but
we already know this word could have a two-fold significance. Those who translated the Bible into English
could have, naturally, assumed this first son of Eve
had to be from Adam - who else could be the father?
Because of this, they could have translated it into English accordingly.

The word knew could also come to mean that Adam…
- was beginning to understand what happened to Eve, and what was going on within her.[8]
-
was becoming aware that Eve actually conceived; not from him, but from the Serpent.[9]
-
was starting to recognize exactly what the Serpent did to them and their world; trying to take in how he
 was robbed of his chance to be the father of Eve’s child.[10]

In the more likely definition of
knew, here: Eve was pregnant, and Adam probably knew, or understood,
that…

                                                     …he (the child) is a true son of the Devil.
                                                                              - Saltair na Rann 1961-1964[11]

…Adam
came to the realization - he knew he was not the father.

Pregnancy

Again, it is imperative to understand who this firstborn of Eve was. As we know, a lot of ancient written
evidence suggests who his probable father was:
the Serpent, himself![12] We can’t stress this concept, or
“drive this point home,” enough!

Even fresh out of the Garden, the Serpent wasn’t far from the lives of Adam and Eve; seemingly around
every corner; looking for ways to capitalize on their depravity. The Serpent probably had a plethora
of information about our former world, which may have included an understanding of pregnancy. The
Serpent could have used this information to continue manipulating her, in many ways.[13]

    (Eve) Begged… (God)… to protect her from
    The sickly gliding snake, which twisted yet…
                             (Phifer, 1890, p. 126)[14]

One way he hoped to trick her would be regarding the Genesis 3:15 Prophecy. The more hopeful Adam and
Eve became for its fulfillment the more she began to succumb to what the Serpent was pushing on her.
After all, God and His angels no longer had as close of a communication with them. There were still
extremely-knowledgeable terrestrial angels (i.e. the Nephilim) around them, however. As time went on, Eve
may have eventually felt more at ease looking to the Serpent for any way he could help her. He could have
also, over time, convinced her that he had God’s best interests for her in mind; even an occasional deliverer
of His messages![15] After all, the Serpent
was an angel - closer to the heavenly realm than she was!
Besides, Eve could use practically any help she could get,
especially in her pregnancy.
Cain, Seed of the Serpent
                                                      Copyright 2015, Brett T., All Rights Reserved.
              No content of this article or of mysterybabylon.com may be reproduced, duplicated, given away,
 
                        transmitted or resold in any form without prior written permission from the author.

Time for Actual Sacrifices

The instructions on the proper method sacrifice was probably supplied by Adam, already. What was to come
from the two would be the proper technique, combined with each one’s own willingness love God enough to
carry it out! This would involve a positive outlook on the sacrifice, as well as to God. As we’ll see, Cain and
Abel would have
very different perspectives on what the sacrifice should be.
Adam probably taught Cain and Abel to offer tithes and their “first fruits” to God.[80] Cain may have done
just the opposite - and saved the last fruits for God, and the best
for him.

The Worst

God knew what was brewing inside of Cain’s head. He already understood what Cain’s true petition to Him
was going to be based upon.[81]

(Abel)… begs Cain to tithe and make burnt offering. The latter will have none of Abel’s sermonizing, and
will not leave his plow. He says that God gives him only sorrow and woe, and he complains of his poor crop
like a grumbling farmer of today… Finally, Cain gives way to Abel’s importunity and begins to tithe, still
grumbling and choosing the best for himself.
                                            (Emerson, 1916, p. 847)[82]

Cain was extremely negative about life; his attitude terrible. Ancient lore tells us that Cain may have even
eaten a meal
first; then decided to take upon this “chore.”[83] After eating most of the vegetables that, in
the back of his mind, he probably considered to be the choicest for the sacrifice, he could have taken
what
was left
up the mountain - “not the best and not the choicest.”[84] Regardless of the exact circumstances,
Cain probably didn’t put a very good effort into it. At the end of the day, Cain's soon-to-be sacrifice would
eventually be directed, if anywhere, towards
himself. The following is a summary of the self-loving ways
Cain may have presented
his “sacrifice:”[85]

-
…he gave only a small portion to (God)…[86]

-
Cain may have offered thorns as sacrifice.[87]

-
He made an offering of ears of wheat that were smitten by blight...[88]

-
Cain gave his grain, that which the wind had exposed.[89]

-
Cain made an offering of some of the refuse of the fruits of his husbandry with reluctance.[90]

-
Cain brought (it) insincerely…[91]

The last two were particularly telling: with
reluctance; doing it insincerely? Now, we seem to be getting to
the heart of the matter. It probably seemed an “inconvenience” for Cain to provide this sacrifice. Why does
he have to, really? One of the most important parts of one’s sacrifice to God truly lies in the intent and
attitude of the participant.
We can surmise that Cain put out what he
thought God would have deserved; whatever he deemed good
enough
to “pacify” the Creator of the Universe! He might have proclaimed something such as:

(Cain speaking)… “Know thou, O Lord… that <from> everything <for> which I have labored and toiled, I
have set aside portion and tithe for you; according to my righteous labors have I offered it to you. And you
know, as it is pleasing to you, thus let your will be done.”
                       (Lipscomb, 1983, p. 159)[92]

It seems that it’s "all about the ‘
I’s’,” here. Cain was, practically, telling God that He should enjoy it! Such
arrogance. This seemed an early example of Cain trying to manipulate a situation - to twist it around - to
benefit from it, in some way. Cain really didn’t want to
work for God’s favor. He may have even begun to
believe that, somehow, he should have been
entitled to some kind of reward, at least for the efforts he
thought fit. Since he was a farmer, bringing to God a sample of his labor, no matter how insignificant, was a
pretty good thought, in his mind. It was something he valued; and this may have deemed appropriate
enough to a self-centered individual such as Cain. On top of it, if his sacrifice was rejected, it (according to
him) probably wouldn't be because he didn't make the effort; it wouldn’t be because Abel was going to
provide a blood sacrifice, just like Adam did; it'd probably be because
he was being treated "unfairly," in
some way!

We already know that
blood played a very important role in these ancient sacrifices to God, and Cain
apparently didn’t dignify the importance of following Adam's instruction to the letter:

                                                    Cain, being unbloody, was an abomination…
                                                                                          (Oliver, 1843, p. 43)[93]

We really need to ask ourselves: what reason(s) would God actually
want to accept Cain’s sacrifice?

Why Even?

It seemed obvious God would not want to accept Cain’s sacrifice, because of his spitefulness and lack of
virtue.[94] It would have been easy for Cain to
even offer a prayer to God, but it didn't seem fit for him to
do even that.[95] It was, ultimately, because he was beginning to feel
contempt for God, and this whole
“sacrifice” thing![96]

                                  …there was no love for the One who would receive his offering.
                                                                                  - St. Ephrem the Syrian Section III 2(2)[97]

Cain really didn’t care about anything, or anyone, but himself - simply.

Ultimately, to the Devil

                              For a sacrifice to be “wrongly divided” ultimately means that it was a
                                                     self-serving venture, not a true sacrifice.
                                                                                           (Delaney, 1996, p. 179)[98]

What made it worse was that this “self-serving venture” of Cain's could, in a way, also qualify as
idolatry;
the “self-worshipping” type of idolatry. Beyond giving God less of the tally than Cain should of; beyond
giving Him the most inferior of his own portions; it seemed that Cain’s thoughts, opinions, and attitudes were
not really directed towards God, or His ways. And, if they weren’t directed towards the ways of God, could
they be, possibly, directed towards something or someone
else?

                            …the remainder he (Cain) dedicated to the Devil (i.e. the Serpent)…
                                                                                     (Baring-Gould, 1881, p. 73)[99]

In a deeper sense, idolatry can
also be associated with one’s thoughts, intent, and be a reflection attitude -
especially as a means of self-love (or self-adoration)![100] In regards to the Bible, one ancient author stated:
“Moses… intimates the difference between a lover of himself, and one who is thoroughly devoted to
God…”[101] Cain’s sacrifice surely wasn’t towards God.
Self-worship isn’t the way God wanted for His
people, either. This is
exactly what the Serpent would have his followers do, however! Since Cain was,
most probably, a son of the Serpent, we see that he was only paying homage to
who and where he came
from:

                          ...Kayin's (Cain’s) offering came from his side, which meant it came from
                                           the Serpent and the Angel of Death… the Unclean Side.
                                                                                             - Zohar 3 Beresheet 60[102]

                                                …(Cain) is drawn to and cleaves to them…
                                                                                             - Zohar 3 Beresheet 60[103]

He was just involving himself in the prototype of what would be, from then on -
ancestor worship. Cain's
sacrifice seemed dedicated towards
the opposite of almost everything one would consider the ways of God.

The Best

Abel, on the other hand, was very discriminate in his choices.[104] He “took the fat, firstlings of his
flock…”[105] It’s easy to conclude
he did it how God wanted - not his own twisted rationale or interpret-
ation. He also utilized:

                                                       …the superiority of a bloody sacrifice.
                                                                               (Delaney, 1996, p. 13)[106]

As with Cain, there were
mental elements and attitudes concerning Abel’s sacrifice, as well. He went about
the process:

                                           …in great love, with a pure heart and a sincere mind.
                                                                                  - The Book of the Bee 18[107]

…obviously, the
right mindset, according to God, was one of the most vital elements of one’s efforts!

The End Results

The time had come for each to find out whether God was going to approve what they did. If God liked it,
traditionally, He would cause a great, “burning fire” to come down from heaven, and overwhelmingly
consume whatever sacrifice was placed upon the altar. Ancient lore tells us that, in regards to Abel’s
sacrifice, that’s exactly what happened.[108] A bright, white, “living” fire swooped down from heaven, and
annihilated Abel’s bloodied animal.[109]
This didn’t happen for Cain, however. Traditionally, the petitioner would light the sacrifice afire, plead to God
for acceptance, and hope it was heard. Cain probably started the “burning process” with, as we know, his
blighted, second-hand fruits and vegetables; but it wouldn’t burn! He tried a number of times, and a number
of ways to set the pile afire, but it
still wouldn’t catch. He even started a fire nearby, and placed the offering
in the middle of this raging fire, yet, even
this wouldn’t scorch it![110] Cain, of course, was baffled, not
understanding why it all happened - again, because he was blinded by his own feelings of self-
righteousness.
We already know that a sacrifice directed towards
the opposite of what God wanted would fail on every
level!

                     …and the gifts of Cain pleased not our Lord, for the sacrifice would not
                                                  light nor burn clear in the light of God.
                                                       - The Golden Legend of Lives of the Saints: Volume I p. 62[111]

When it was time for God show His approval or denial, a fire
did come down - but not the way Cain had
expected it.

It so demolished Cain’s sacrifice that there was no grain left - all of it was scattered… the wind blew grain
of Cain destroyed such that a single ear of grain was not to be found.
           (Lipscomb, 1983, p. 271)[112]

It did devour Cain’s sacrifice, but not like Abel’s. It seemed to be much more like how someone would
(symbolically) "shoo away" something they didn't like; a lot like how the faithful of the Old Testament would
"shoo away" something from them they deemed idolatrous or wicked.

There was one more change about to come upon Cain - a very controversial one. Some suggested
that Cain was darkened at the time of this “shooing-away” event. Whatever happened to Cain at this time
has been a heavily debated and misunderstood topic throughout the years, and it
still has a good deal of
relevance to our world, today! Let’s see what this could be.

The Illumination of One's Countenance

As we know, Cain had a brilliant shine to him since birth; but, apparently, no longer:

                                                      …chastisment was afflicted upon him.
                                                                                 (Ginzberg, 1909, p. 108)[113]

Not only did God’s bright fire, or divine “light,” come down and consume Abel’s sacrifice, it also seemed to
illuminate his
face.[114] The opposite was said to have happened to Cain. Now, what does this mean?

The "Blackened" Face

There are a number of ancient traditions which state that, at this time, not only did God’s smoking fire come
down and demolish Cain’s sacrifice (in that “negative” way), it smoked
him out, too - the “blackened” smoke
of God was said to have resonated all over
his face; turning him into a person who looked, from then on, as
one who was “black as coal.”[115]

                                  …now, naturally, all of his children were now considered black.
                                                                     ("Evidence of Blacks in the Bible", n. d., p. 1)[116]

Said to be a divine “symbol” of God’s disfavor, this was considered, by some, the beginning of black, or
African, peoples. Others even have postulated this was Cain’s famous “mark.” It also represents one
example of religious justification for those who defended enslaving black people over the centuries - they
were the “sons of Cain,” and, naturally, fell worthy of this enslavement.

As politically incorrect as all of this may sound, we need to look at the
whole story, in regards to all of this,
and never leave something out for any “P.C.” reason! Regarding this concept, one thing that really doesn’t
sit well (beyond the obvious political incorrectness) is that, maintaining our assumption that Cain was
indeed the
Sargon (i.e. “King-Cain”), the Marduk, or other of the ancient pagan “gods” of Babylonia, a
majority of them were not painted as being black in skin color. In fact, it was more like the
opposite.
Sargon’s hair was, apparently, thought to be
light in color.[117] Other traditions equated Cain’s beard as a
yellow beard - which could easily have painted him as a blonde.[118] In fact, if we assume Cain’s father
was a terrestrial
angel (in his case, a Saraph), we have a good amount of ancient written evidence
supporting these crossbred offspring of terrestrial angel and women as
pale, or white skinned.[119] The
same were often crowned with a thick head of
white, or golden-blonde, hair.[120]

Cain’s blackened face may have been a misinterpretation; and, we really need to point this out, here - not to
become “politically correct,” but try to shed some
truth to this whole story. If anything, understanding this
might help to “clear the air" of so much hate and racial discrimination that may have gone on, over the years,
as well as “clear the air” of all the backlash and hatred for Christianity and the Bible, too! Hopefully,
knowledge such as this could help clear up a lot of
potential animosity, as well - to all of those involved.

Let’s see what the
real meaning of Cain's "blackness" could be…

Outer Darkness, or Inner Darkness...

As we’ve discussed, a number of traditional or mythological accounts could not really capture one
important element of a story: the
inner thoughts or emotions going on inside one’s head! This, as we’re
seeing more and more of, is becoming a rash all over our understanding of the
Mystery side of Mystery
Babylon
! Again, this seems to come into play, here.
Logic tells us that, since there could have been a number of
mental elements to a story symbolized by words
such as
black and darkness, the same could be applied to this story of Cain and Abel. By inserting mental
elements to this story, as well, we could gather a deeper, and more probable, understanding of it all!
Possibly, Abel’s
change of countenance did not mean that he become brighter "on the outside," but, rather,
he felt a great feeling
overall - and it showed up as a “glow” on his face! His whole outer “countenance”
was brightened; ultimately shining with happiness and satisfaction! The Bible plainly stated that Cain was
angered as result of his sacrifice being rejected, and his countenance fell (Gen. 4:6). There are a number of
commentaries on this story which support a
mental or emotional significance to the darkness of Cain:
something
inside of him had turned black, or was darkened - and that showed up on his face:

-
Then Cain burned hot with great anger
 And his face fell
 Darkened with resentment[121]

-
Cain’s face turned black in a rage of jealous pride![122]

-
Dark, rough, senseless Cain…[123]

-
But to Cain and to his offering He (God) did not turn, and it annoyed Cain exceedingly, and
 his countenance fell.[124]

-
…the face of Cain… burned with dark redness as one who seethes with anger…
 as does the face of one who has been greatly humiliated and deeply hurt.[125]

Cain may have lost some, or most, of his original heavenly
shine at this time. Not only this, he may have
become “darkened” in other ways! He was flabbergasted - literally “beside himself” in humiliation. In his
self-centered, pride-filled mind, this was the ultimate in rejection. It was, to him, like one who had
lost it all:
his self-esteem; his firstborn privileges; his future wife - you name it: all
darkened; all gone. From then on,
Cain’s whole look and outlook on life was "to the brim” with negativity; an irrevocable path he was, now,
destined to follow.

Emotions

Evil always seemed to waiting at the door of Cain’s heart; this incident affected him enough to "unlock" that
door, ready for all outside to enter. All Cain had to do was open the latch, and let the evil make its way in.

His thoughts and emotions could, indeed, help to get him there. Whether his offering was to be accepted or
not, God already knew the depths of Cain’s soul, and how his will was ready to be made known.[126] God
knew what was going on inside of Cain before he even began. Cain was teetering on the edge of following
the same direction as his father (the Serpent); and, now, never going back.
One ancient author stated that God wanted to despise Cain’s offering, not only because of how he did it, but
because of what he was
about to do to Abel, in the future![127] Even what Cain was about to do in the future
“hangs in the balance” of God’s favor at the present time… something to ponder.

After Cain's initial “shock,” emotion flooded into his thought-processes. As we know, he probably didn’t really
understand the
real reasons behind God's rejection – his mind was so filled with pride.[128] How dare
anyone disrespect him in such a way?[129] An emotion that soon began to fill Cain's soul would be one that
many of us would expect a typical son of the Serpent-like Cain would have:
anger.[130]

Angry Cain

Cain was feeling fear, insecurity, as well, some paranoia. One ancient author stated: “He thought there
was laughter in the eyes of his parents and his sisters, etc., when his offering was rejected.”[131] More
insecurities began to haunt him, such as: “He (Abel) will go to the Garden, and I will remain outside.”[132]
He began to think that everyone around him was eventually going to reach a state of “perfection” - which
was equated at that time to the Garden - except
him; and, to him, that wasn’t fair.
If Cain had any brotherly love left, it was almost dissipated by now. As we know, Cain truly had no excuse
for his sacrifice not being accepted, however:
he made the error in judgment; he did something disobedient.
Deep down inside, his conscience probably told him that. Regardless, he had anger; a sense of anger, yes,
but completely unjustified anger. In Cain’s heart:

       …(he was envious) of his brother’s relationship with God, which he could not have so long as he
          continued in his selfish, greedy, competitive course – the way of pride, arrogance, and self-will.
                                                   ("The Mark of the Beast and the Mark of Cain", n. d., p. 9)[133]

Resurgence of Serpent Envy

On top of it, Cain began to feel a lot of envy. Now, doesn’t this emotion sound familiar? As we recall, there
was someone in the Garden who showed a great deal of this envy, as well:

                                        …he (the Serpent) cast this envy into the heart of Cain…
                                                              - Book of the Glory of Kings (Kerba Nagast) 4[134]

Envy can be defined as: a “resentful awareness of an advantage enjoyed by another joined with a desire to
possess the same advantage.”[135] The first major semblance of Cain’s envy was directed against the
sacrifice that was accepted, and, of course, it’s preparer:
Abel.[136] The “thoughts which lay in the heart of
Cain gave him no rest.”[137] What did Abel do to Cain anyway, besides provide an offering that actually
worked? This became an example of, “the diabolical envy that the wicked feel for the good simply because
they are good, while themselves are evil."[138] Envy would end up being a good portion of the reason Cain
desired to kill his brother![139] It’s obvious that, “both father and son displayed the same wickedness.”[140]
They had became
united in thought, and had “not separated the same disposition.”[141]

Cain - a "tool" of the Serpent and the Nephilim - would soon become
the symbol of whomever was against
the ways of God at the time:

                             Cain was born to perpetuate the devil's frustrated rage on this earth.
                                                                                 ("John Reeve", n. d., p. 2)[142]

Cain would not be able to control his passions and anger for long. He soon felt the need to act...

Premeditated Ideals

Next, Cain may have begun to believe it was time for “payback,” to both God and Abel, for “insulting” him,
and not doing things the way
he thought they should be.

                                          …his soul suggested to him that he kill his brother.
                                                        - The History of al-Tabari - Volume I Cain and Abel 138[143]

He began to think of ways to “take his brother out,” to devise “words of quarrel and contention, to find a
pretext to kill him.”[144] Yes, Cain could not “be expected to understand fully man’s obligation to man.”[145]
He really didn’t have empathy; he really didn’t care how close his victim was to him - he wanted what he
wanted.
He began to have a few “aces” up his sleeve: he would first “trick” Abel into a quarrel, then take him out.
Yes, it was all premeditated - no 2nd degree or “manslaughter” defense, here.

To set the stage, Cain began to manipulate the situation around him, to obtain some sort of advantage.

        
                                                                           - - -

For more information on the above section, please browse our selection of
Mystery Babylon books (especially
The Rise of Mystery Babylon - The Tower of Babel (Part 1)”!

Further Attempts to Trick Eve

She was fairly horrified of this whole process. She didn’t know what was going to happen. His manipulations
would intensify. Apparently, she even feared she might bring forth some unnatural or inhuman
animal
(because of her act of cross breeding with a terrestrial angel)!
The Serpent, next, may have claimed that he knew how she could produce a normal human baby - without
any defects. All she had to do was to make a deal with him. He bargained: If your baby “comes out healthy,
without harming or killing you, well, then you should obey me in whatever I command you?”[16] With the
Serpent’s “connections,” he could assure that God would bring a healthy baby to come out of her.[17] Of
course, if the baby was,
naturally, born healthy, then the Serpent could claim all the credit![18] On top of it,
“there is nothing in the record to indicate that Eve ever told Adam anything about her affair with the
serpent.”[19] Adam assuredly must have taken an intelligent guess about it, but, in those days, no one
knew for sure.
Eve was, assuredly, torn about what the Serpent told her, as well. They wouldn’t have many of the answers
they were looking for… at least until she took a look at the baby for the first time.

Time For a Midwife

The time had come for the birth of whomever was inside her. She was beginning her labor. God appointed
angels to surround Eve, to assist in the birth. One angel could have even helped serve as a midwife.[20]
In this new and frightening process, a boy was born. The words of the Serpent echoed in her, as well as
her hopes this child might be this "promised one.”
When the male child was born, Eve reportedly became frightened of the child; so scared she may have even
wished to kill him![21] The child looked visibly different than her and Adam; but, as her thoughts progressed,
she may have started to reflect on what she had learned, and changed her tune. Maybe these strange
attributes were a
good sign. One, or both, decided to name the child Cain.[22]

....Eve conceiv’d by Sammael, and brought forth Cain; and… she saw, by his shape, that he was unlike
the lower creatures, and that he was of the upper creation…
                                                                                           (Eisenmenger, 1748, p. 197)[23]

In other words, he looked, at least in part, as if he was a heavenly being - or came from one. As already
explained, he had the same angelic countenance, or “shine,” to him as the angels around him might have
had. Some traditions stated Cain might have “shown” brightly, as the sun![24] This well-formed Cain
corresponded perfectly to Eve’s exclamation of him in the Bible: he came “from the Lord” or “from an angel
of the Lord” (Gen. 4:1).[25] We also know that Adam and most everyone around him lost most of their
“shine” they might have once had, because of the Fall. Cain wasn’t in the image of Adam, or any
other
human being at the time![26] It was, probably, fairly easy for Adam to conclude he wasn’t the father.[27] If
we think about it, there is no place in the Bible that states Adam was the father of all living![28]
On top of it all, Cain’s “other-worldly” appearance could have given Eve a shot at her dream - maybe he
was the “promised one;” the child able to neutralize the shame Adam and Eve brought upon the world![29]
Eve thought: maybe the Serpent’s dialogue wasn’t really too far off the mark! Eve saw that Cain was quite
the
opposite of a deformed, inhuman beast. In fact, he looked like the opposite of most everybody around
them. Maybe the Serpent
did have the ability to influence her life for the better; maybe their child was the
one that could usher them back towards their former life in the Garden of Eden!

    In thinking Cain had really brought bliss…
    Wore off the rough, sharp corners of her woe.
                               (Phifer, 1890, p. 147)[30]

Cain, in reality, would head those around him in
opposing directions…

Angelic and Human Bloodlines

Cain was an anomaly, that’s for sure. According to one author, “wickedness came into the world via the first
being born of woman, Cain, the so-called oldest son of Adam.”[31] It may have been "one big happy family" if
Adam and Eve had their own, righteous children; but, even back then, our world was quickly becoming very
complex.

Unlike people who may mix races or creeds, Cain and other up-and-coming angelic-human offspring were to
be condemned by God. The reason being, sorry to say, was these offspring were an intrusion into our
natural world that God, plainly, did not authorize, intend, or create.[32] Interestingly enough, there seems to
be other, little-known meanings for words such as “adultery” or “fornication” - related to Cain and other of
these cross-bred, angel-human mixtures.

                      First, adultery came into being, afterward murder. And he (Cain) was begotten in
                                                   adultery, for he was a child of the Serpent.
                                                                                         - The Gospel of Philip[33]

The use of
fornication, as well (such as between Eve and the Serpent) could very well result in the birth of a
child - a child that, probably, was not planned at the time, or, an offspring not
meant for this world (such as
in the case of Eve)![34]

The Prediction of Worthlessness

According to ancient lore, Cain was able to show some interesting, “adult-like” characteristics, soon after
his birth! Eve, according to the Bible, stated that she had gotten a man from the Lord (Gen. 4:1). Why a
man, here, and not a child?

In one of the many Hebrew meanings of the name
Cain, it can also mean "stalk" or "straw."[35] Why? We
have an interesting legend regarding his birth to explain: even as a new-born infant, Cain “could walk,
immediately cutting the grass for his father.”[36] A short time after his birth, it was fairly easy for Cain to
stand up, waddle a few feet, and pick up a blade of grass. He yanked this blade out of the ground (probably
by the roots) and walked back over to Adam, and gave it to him. This event seemed to be an omen of what
would be the child’s future (at least coming from the mouth of one of the angels who attended Eve at the
birth):

…the newborn’s infants first act is a destructive one - he pulls out grass around another’s hut, which
never grows back… (then) the attending Angel said to him (Cain), “your legacy will be of adultery and
bitterness.”
                                                                                   (Schwartz, 2004, p. 449)[37]

Cain,
indeed, would destroy much of what was around him, reduce much to worthlessness, and fatally
corrupt the lives of many.

                        They first bore the abominable Cain, the murderous child of destruction.
                                                                                 (Anderson, 2000, p. 203)[38]

Eve’s birth, according to one ancient source, was very painful and difficult, indeed (worse than how normal
births were destined to be, from then on). Even this seemed to correlate with Cain’s future life:[39]

…the harsh snake instilled the impurity of harsh judgment in her… Therefore, when Cain emerged from the
side of the female he exited rough and hard, harsh in judgment and heavy in judgment.
                                                                                            - Zohar 38 Naso 47[40]

"Augmented" Abel

According to one ancient author, Cain was considered the “elder son of evil.”[41] Now, if Cain was the elder
(i.e. first-born) son of Eve, where does Abel, his brother, come into play?
Eve, then, was said to have
augmented or continued on in labor - to give birth to Cain and Abel at almost
the same time![42] Here’s the first example of God’s promise to “multiply… thy conception” (Gen. 3:16). In
this case, the “multiplying” of conception resulted in Eve having two twin boys![43]

It is written: "Adam knew his wife, Chavah (Eve), and she conceived and gave birth to Kayin (Cain)"…
(Gen. 4:1), but it is not written that Adam begot Kayin (Cain). This was not written of Hevel (Abel) either.
Instead, it is written: "and she further gave birth to his brother, Hevel (Abel)" (Gen. 4:2). And here lies the
concealed truth, that even Hevel (Abel) was not in the image or likeness of Adam.
                                                                                                 - Zohar 3 Beresheet 62[44]

Logic would dictate that
both Cain and Abel would not look like a son of Adam, then. Adam, according to the
Bible, didn't seem to have a child who looked like him until the birth of his son
Seth (in Gen. 5:3).
Interestingly enough, the up-and-coming death of one of Eve's children would greatly "multiply” Eve’s
sorrow, as well - another curse that was pronounced to her by God (in Gen. 3:16).[45]

Those Twins

A good number of these early conceptions, in fact, might have been twins. Why? At least, in this early time,
God may have designed to have a number of twins be born to help ensure propagation of the human
race.[46] Because of the purity that probably existed in our early gene pool, marriages between close
relatives probably was not as much of a potential problem as it could be, later on.

                                                    …Cain and Abel were both Satan’s sons…
                                                                              (Graves & Patai, 1964, p. 99)[47]

Ancient lore tells us that, quite often, a
daughter was born with a twin son for this very reason.[48]

It was probably apparent that Abel, also, was not sired of Adam. But, for some reason, baby Abel already
seemed a little different. He looked as though he would grow up to be one with a better disposition
-
something just seemed to be written all over his face.

…at that sorrowful moment Cain was born, and when Adam saw that the face of Cain was ill-tempered (or,
sullen) and his appearance evil he was sad. And then Abel was born, and when Adam saw that his
appearance was good and his face good-tempered…
                                                                       - Book of the Glory of Kings (Kerba Nagast) 3[49]

Adam had some definite ideas about Cain, as well. It was said that, from Abel, would come someone “more
merciful, but still not perfect.”[50] In other words, the two were, “like good wine mixed with bad…”[51]
Although both may have come from the Serpent, they did seem to be a little different “right out of the
starting gate.” Why? What would separate the two? It clearly wasn’t their bloodlines.
There is another ancient source that suggested Cain was “full of light;” Abel, however, appeared to be “well-
minded.”[52] This seemed an important distinction between Cain and Abel: Cain and Abel both probably had
a wonderful, outward appearance; Abel, however, had a wonderful
inner appearance - a good-thinking
mind, as well.

Cain, technically, was born first; hence, he was supposedly allowed to be the bearer of the birthright. In
ancient times, a child born
first to a couple was entitled to special privileges. Since Adam was, obviously, in
the position to rear both as his own, he tried to follow this protocol; but also began to take a shine to the
well-minded Abel.

Growing Up

Adam, as already mentioned, probably adopted both children. As Cain grew up, he began to take on a
number of negative mannerisms: he acted “strong-limbed” towards others; “swift;” “fierce;” and, ultimately,
was beginning to act “truly wild.”[53] Obviously, there was a reason Adam was beginning to lean towards
favoring Abel, beyond his positive appearance at birth. Regardless of his being a son of the Serpent, Abel
was walking in the
spirit of Adam and God, and began to make great use of the ways God laid out for the
human race (such as thoughtfulness and humility).[54] He strived to be a good person; to care and show
respect for others; and, ultimately, to “tell it like it was.”
Abel would deal with people “in the integrity of his soul, bearing witness to the truth.”[55] “He paid heed to
virtue; Cain, on the other hand, had an eye only to
gain."[56] What was going on with Cain? Why was he
beginning to sour so quickly? As one might expect, “Neither did his (Cain’s) deeds resemble those of Abel;
Cain inherited the nature of Sammael.”[57] “Cain looked and acted exactly as one would expect a son of the
Serpent to look and to act.”[58] The Serpent, and not God, appeared to have been the foundation of Cain’s
negativity.
There was a little more to this, however: Cain also began to concentrate on what
the world around him had
to offer, and not God:

                        …the contemptible snake… immediately laid hold of and destroyed Cain
                                                   by filling him with worldly forgetfulness.
                                                                                           (Layton, 1995, p. 177)[59]

Cain, for example, began to dwell on his birthright. Even back in his youth, he started to rationalize that,
since he technically was the eldest, he deserved to have twice as much, or double-share, of everything in
this world.[60] This was probably one of the earliest versions of one having an “entitlement mentality.” As
we’ve seen throughout the Bible; it wasn’t necessarily the most profitable for a person to be firstborn -
many of our great Biblical patriarchs were not!
As one could also guess, God was looking down on the two, already. Because He knew what was going on
inside of their hearts, He may have begun to show a little more favoritism towards Abel, as well.[61] That
comes as no surprise!

Eve, on the other hand, really loved her firstborn son, regardless of who his father was, and, even, regard-
less of how he was beginning to act around other people. After all, Cain
was her son. Mothers and sons
often seem to have that close bond, no matter what. She went out on a limb, and ventured to teach Cain
everything she knew.[62] Although Adam tried to love them both the same, he could see potential problems
with how Cain was beginning to act. Soon, he began to feel a need to do something about it.

The Opposing Occupations - Shepherd Vs. Farmer

Time passed. The twins began to make their own places in their world. It seemed their soon-to-be occu-
pations would actually suit them, each, in their own way. Adam really didn’t want them to work together;
he even wanted them, in ways, to be apart. Even though Cain was firstborn, he really wasn’t judged by this
right; but, by his actions. Adam pushed, possibly appointed, them towards two distinct occupations, based
upon his foresight.
From early childhood, Abel was said to have spent a lot of time with domestic animals. “He was gifted in
working with them, understanding and caring for their needs…”[63]

…when their actions are to be compared together, he (Abel) is placed first… one of them exercises a
business, and takes care of living creatures, although they are devoid of reason, gladly taking upon himself
the employment of a shepherd…
                              - Philo Questions and Answers on Genesis 1(59)[64]

(The shepherd)… prepares himself for a Godly life: by separating himself from material temptations, by
living simply, by developing within himself the power of inner contemplation and the joy of inner content-
ment. Abel displayed wisdom and strength of character…
                                  (Eichhorn, 1957, p. 36)[65]

It’s obvious: Abel had a strong character, a good moral foundation, and a lot of dignity. We see, throughout
the Bible, that God and Jesus were thought to be
shepherds, of sorts. The “good shepherd” - Jesus -
helped people, not exploited them.
Cain, of course, would lean towards a desire to work the ground, as a farmer, and began to take this
profession as his own. Nothing against any modern farmers, but Cain went way beyond how a farmer
would normally act, and possess a great deal of yearning towards anything that was
of this earth.

                             …the other devotes his attention to earthly and inanimate objects.
                                                                               Philo Questions and Answers on Genesis 1(59)[66]

He “selected farming as his occupation because real estate is the most
tangible of all earthly assets…”[67]
Cain would become very materialistic - "wholly intent on getting."[68] This “closeness to the earth” would
open up Cain to become irrevocably fused with this vice.

    Cain… tiller of earth
    A slave to dirt.
              (Halevi, 1997, p. 246)[69]

The relationship between a farmer and his crops can be a very impersonal, very crass one.[70] Cain
“idolized material property and material values” and the “physical strength and power” that the world he lived
in was able to give.[71] To a self-lover such as Cain, everything was ”all about him!”[72] We will see that,
ultimately, Cain, and those who would eventually follow him, would adopt these same thoughts: they
“abandoned the way of God and put their trust in
earthly goods.”[73]

Which Wife To Whom?

On top of it, there could have been one more significance piece to our puzzle, here. The ancient Hebrew
words used to describe the birth of Cain and Abel, here, might allude to even
more children being born at
this time! As fascinating as it may seem, some traditions have stated that Eve may have
continued, or
added to, her offspring - even beyond Cain and Abel! At least one sister was said to be born with each
male![74] Yes, quadruplets.
Regardless if this was the way these births actually occurred, there may have been a sister of Cain, some-
where down the line, who'd prove to be a wedge in the relationship between him and Abel. Cain’s
selfishness was about to come “full circle;” and this sister could, very well, have been one element behind
the eventual slaying of his own brother.

Adam may have desired to appoint Abel’s twin sister for Cain, and Cain’s for Abel. Cain, however, did not
like this set up, and did not want to succumb to his plan. He wanted it his
own way, and have his own
gorgeous sister.[75] Upon catching wind of Cain’s selfish thought, Adam was grieved, and may have spoken
out against it. He could have brought the twins together, and gave them a task to do: a way to prove their
worthiness to each of these women. Adam could have suggested that they both:

                      "…go ye up to the top of this holy mountain… and offer up your offerings there,
                                       and pray before God, and then be united unto your wives."
                                                                                                    - Book of the Bee 18[76]

Now, the ultimate decision would be up to God. As the two were heading up to provide the sacrifices, the
Serpent’s inner influences began to enter into Cain’s thought processes. Cain allowed his mind to be filled
with a number of hate-filled thoughts. One medieval interpretation of the individuals who lived before the
flood provides us interesting insight into what might really have been going on in Cain’s world at this time:
a plot against Abel’s life might have already been in the works:

(The people of the antediluvian world)… imitated the abominable deeds of the rebellious angels of a former
time in which, when Abel tried to check them, they encompassed his death by a conspiracy.
                                                                        - "Livre d'Adam" (in Migne, Dictionnaire) 1:56[77]

Abel may have done exactly what many of us assumed he would have: spoke out
against what he saw.
He
called out the Nephilim, when they were beginning to reveal hidden knowledge to women around them.
The Nephilim and Serpent could have already been whispering in Cain’s ear, stirring up emotions inside
his head. Now, he could be feeling a sense of peer pressure, as well as passions over a woman. Cain may
have begun to devise a way to “take Abel out,” and acquire his sister
by force if he needed to![78] He was
fully intent on
possessing whatever he wanted in this world.

Unlike Cain, Abel’s disposition was, most always, a lot more positive: he “told it like it was,” but still had the
willingness to compromise. “Abel loved his brother, and they always used to eat and drink and walk
together.”[79] Cain apparently did not show Abel the same respect. Ultimately, it wasn’t only the whisperings
of the Serpent and a woman that helped rile him up; his thoughts concerning this up-and-coming sacrifice
would probably get the better of him.
                                                                                                    Footnotes
[1]  T. W. Doane,
Bible Myths and Their Parallels in Other Religions: Being a Comparison of the Old And New Testament Myths and
Miracles With Those of Heathen Nations of Antiquity Considering Also Their Origin and Meaning
(New York: University Books, 1882), 10.
[2]  T. W. Doane,
Bible Myths and Their Parallels in Other Religions: Being a Comparison of the Old And New Testament Myths and
Miracles With Those of Heathen Nations of Antiquity Considering Also Their Origin and Meaning
(New York: University Books, 1882), 11.
[3]  David Max Eichhorn,
Cain: Son of the Serpent (New York: Whittier Books, Inc., 1957), 40.
[4]  
The Book of the Bee, 18.
[5]  David Max Eichhorn,
Cain: Son of the Serpent (New York: Whittier Books, Inc., 1957), 40.
[6]  Ralph Edward Woodrow,
Babylon Mystery Religion: Ancient and Modern (Riverside, California: Ralph Woodrow Evangelistic Asso-
ciation, Inc., 1966), 90; Dan Gayman,
The Two Seeds of Genesis 3:15 (Daniel Lee Gayman, 1977), 69-70.
[7]  C. A. Phifer,
Annals of the Earth (Chicago, Illinois: American Publishers Association, 1890), 154.71 1.
[8]  
Rabbi Abraham Ibn Ezra’s Commentary on the Creation, trans. Michael Linetsky (Northvale, New Jersey: Jason Aronson Inc., 1998),
75 (notes).
[9]  
Aramaic Targum; Jerusalem Targum; Dan Gayman, The Two Seeds of Genesis 3:15 (Daniel Lee Gayman, 1977), 416.
[10]  1C180.
[11]  
Saltair na Rann, 1961-1964, trans. David Greene.
[12]  
The Zohar, 2 Beresheet a50; Oliver Farrar Emerson, Legends of Cain, Especially in Old and Middle English (Philadelphia, Penn-
sylvania: American Sunday-School Union, 1916), 839, 878 (notes), 896;
The Zohar, 32 Acharei Mot 59; The Zohar, 22 Safra Det'zniuta 3;
Louis Ginzberg,
The Legends of the Jews Volume I: From the Creation to Jacob, trans. Henrietta Szold (Baltimore, Maryland: The Johns
Hopkins University Press, 1909), 105; The Zohar, 2 Beresheet a47.
[13]  C. A. Phifer,
Annals of the Earth (Chicago, Illinois: American Publishers Association, 1890), 146.
[14]  C. A. Phifer,
Annals of the Earth (Chicago, Illinois: American Publishers Association, 1890), 54.126.
[15]  Dan Gayman,
The Two Seeds of Genesis 3:15 (Daniel Lee Gayman, 1977), 33.
[16]  
The History of al-Tabari - Volume I: General Introduction and From the Creation to the Flood, Iblis and Adam's Children, 150, trans.
Franz Rosenthal (Albany: New York Press, 1989), 321.
[17]  
The History of al-Tabari - Volume I: General Introduction and From the Creation to the Flood, Iblis and Adam's Children, 150, trans.
Franz Rosenthal (Albany: New York Press, 1989), 321.
[18]  
The History of al-Tabari - Volume I: General Introduction and From the Creation to the Flood, Iblis and Adam's Children, 149, trans.
Franz Rosenthal (Albany: New York Press, 1989), 320.
[19]  David Max Eichhorn,
Cain: Son of the Serpent (New York: Whittier Books, Inc., 1957), 29.
[20]  Howard Schwartz,
Tree of Souls: The Mythology of Judaism (Oxford: University Press, 2004), 449.
[21]  
Vita Adae Et Evae (The Life of Adam and Eve), 31 (notes), trans. R. H. Charles, The Apocrypha and Pseudepigrapha of the Old
Testament (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1913).
[22]  
Saltair na Rann, 1909-1912, trans. David Greene.
[23]  Johann Andreas Eisenmenger,
The Traditions of the Jews, Contained in the Talmud and Other Mystical Writings (London: J.
Robinson, 1748), 197.
[24]  Bentley Layton,
The Gnostic Scriptures, “Other” Gnostic Teachings According to St. Irenaeus 1.30.7 (New York: Doubleday, 1995),
176; Louis Ginzberg,
The Legends of the Jews Volume V: Notes for Volume One and Two, III The Ten Generations 6, trans. Henrietta
Szold (Baltimore, Maryland: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1909), 135;
Saltair na Rann, 1901-1904, trans. David Greene; Howard
Schwartz,
Tree of Souls: The Mythology of Judaism (Oxford: University Press, 2004), 443; Aramaic Targum; Jerusalem Targum; Dan
Gayman,
The Two Seeds of Genesis 3:15 (Daniel Lee Gayman, 1977), 416.
[25]  Brian S. Wright,
Blood & Seed: What Really Happened in Eden (The American Biblical Institute of Holy Land Studies, 2010), 114;
Oliver Farrar Emerson,
Legends of Cain, Especially in Old and Middle English (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: American Sunday-School
Union, 1916), 896; Anonymous,
New Interpretation of a Portion of the Third Chapter of Genesis, Viewed in Connection With Other Parts
of the Bible; Including an Inquiry Into the Introduction, Nature, and Extent of Satanic Influence in the World
(London, J. Hatchard and
Son, 1834), 103; St. Chrysostom,
Homilies on Genesis, Homily 18.9, http://www2.iath.virginia.edu/anderson/commentaries/ChrGen.html
(accessed Jan. 12, 2011); St. Ephrem the Syrian:
Selected Prose Works, ,Section III.1 trans. Edward G. Mathews, Jr. and Joseph P.
Amar (Washington, D. C.: The Catholic University of America Press, 1994), 124.
[26]  Dan Gayman,
The Two Seeds of Genesis 3:15 (Daniel Lee Gayman, 1977), 369; The Zohar, 3 Beresheet b62; Andrew Collins, From
the Ashes of Angels (Rochester, Vermont: Bear & Company, 1996), 55.
[27]  Dan Gayman,
The Two Seeds of Genesis 3:15 (Daniel Lee Gayman, 1977), 33.
[28]  
Mystery of Civilization, 1, http://www.servantsofyahweh.mcmail.com/Armstrong/Armstrong07.htm (accessed April 24, 2001).
[29]  
The Original Sin, 1, http://www.biblebelievers.org.htm; C. A. Phifer, Annals of the Earth (Chicago, Illinois: American Publishers
Association, 1890), 146.
[30]  C. A. Phifer,
Annals of the Earth (Chicago, Illinois: American Publishers Association, 1890), 147.
[31]  Louis Ginzberg,
The Legends of the Jews Volume I: From the Creation to Jacob, trans. Henrietta Szold (Baltimore, Maryland: The
Johns Hopkins University Press, 1909), 105.
[32]  Richard Gan,
The Original Sin, 2, http://www.propheticrevelation.net/original_sin/the_serpent_seed_1.htm (accessed March 24,
2011).
[33]  
The Gospel of Philip, trans. Wesley W. Isenberg, http://www.gnosis.org/naghamm/gop.html (accessed Feb. 4, 2010).
[34]  
The Zohar, 3 Beresheet b60.
[35]  Louis Ginzberg,
The Legends of the Jews Volume I: From the Creation to Jacob, trans. Henrietta Szold (Baltimore, Maryland: The
Johns Hopkins University Press, 1909), 106.
[36]  
Saltair na Rann, 1897-1900, trans. David Greene.
[37]  Howard Schwartz,
Tree of Souls: The Mythology of Judaism (Oxford: University Press, 2004), 449.
[38]  
Literature on Adam and Eve: Collected Essays, 116, trans. Gary Anderson, Michael Stone and Johannes Tromp (Leiden: Brill,
2000) 203.
[39]  
Saltair na Rann, 1957-1960, trans. David Greene.
[40]  
The Zohar, 38 Naso 47.
[41]  
The Works of Philo, 839-840.
[42]  188, p. 17.
[43]  188, p. 16; Bentley Layton,
The Gnostic Scriptures, The Archontics According to St. Epiphanius, Cain and Abel 40.5.3 (New York:
Doubleday, 1995), 25, 35-38, 197; Robert Graves and Raphael Patai,
Hebrew Myths: The Book of Genesis (Garden City, New York:
Doubleday & Company, 1964), 99; John Skinner,
A Critical and Exegetical Commentary on Genesis, 4 2 (Edinburgh: T. & T. Clark, 1956),
103.
[44]  
The Zohar, 3 Beresheet b62.
[45]  188, p. 16.
[46]  Louis Ginzberg,
The Legends of the Jews Volume I: From the Creation to Jacob, trans. Henrietta Szold (Baltimore, Maryland: The
Johns Hopkins University Press, 1909), 108.
[47]  Robert Graves and Raphael Patai,
Hebrew Myths: The Book of Genesis (Garden City, New York: Doubleday & Company, 1964), 99.
[48]  
Saltair na Rann, 2493-2496, trans. David Greene.
[49]  
Book of the Glory of Kings (Kerba Nagast), 3. Concerning the Kingdom of Adam, trans. Sir. E. A. Wallis Budge (London: Humphrey
Milford, 1932).
[50]  
The Zohar, 2 Beresheet a47.
[51]  
The Zohar, 2 Beresheet a47.
[52]  
Vita Adae Et Evae (The Life of Adam and Eve), i.3, trans. R. H. Charles, The Apocrypha and Pseudepigrapha of the Old Testament
(Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1913).
[53]  
Saltair na Rann, 1901-1904, trans. David Greene.
[54]  Louis Ginzberg,
The Legends of the Jews Volume V: Notes for Volume One and Two, III The Ten Generations 12, trans. Henrietta
Szold (Baltimore, Maryland: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1909), 136.
[55]  
The Book of the Generations of Adam, Ch. 5.1, http://www.earth-history.com/Pseudepigrapha/generations-adam.htm (accessed May
5, 2007).
[56]  Josephus,
Jewish Antiquities, Book 1, I 50-54, trans. H. ST. J. Thackeray (London: William Heinemann Ltd., 1961), 25.
[57]  
Pirke De Rabbi Eliezer, Chapter 22: The Fall of the Angels [26a. i.] (notes) [A. i.], trans. Gerald Friedlander (New York: Sepher-
Hermon Press, 1981), Ch. 22 The Fall of the Angels [26a. i.] 158.
[58]  David Max Eichhorn,
Cain: Son of the Serpent (New York: Whittier Books, Inc., 1957), 37.
[59]  Bentley Layton,
The Gnostic Scriptures, 1.30.9 Cain and Abel (New York: Doubleday, 1995), 177.
[60]  Samuel A. Berman,
Midrash Tanhuma-Yelammedenu: An English Translation of Genesis and Exodus from the Printed Version of
Tanhuma-Yelammedenu with an Introduction, Notes, and Indexes
(Hoboken, New Jersey: KTAV Publishing House, 1996), 28; David Max
Eichhorn,
Cain: Son of the Serpent (New York: Whittier Books, Inc., 1957), 64.
[61]  
Saltair na Rann, 1977-1980, trans. David Greene.
[62]  E. S. G. Bristowe,
Cain - An Argument (Leicester: Edgar Backus, 1950), 95.
[63]  
The Book of the Generations of Adam, Ch. 5.3, http://www.earth-history.com/Pseudepigrapha/generations-adam.htm (accessed May
5, 2007).
[64]  
The Works of Philo Judaeus, Questions and Answers on Genesis 1(59), trans. C. D. Yonge (London: H. G. Bohn, 1854-5).
[65]  David Max Eichhorn,
Cain: Son of the Serpent (New York: Whittier Books, Inc., 1957), 36.
[66]  
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The Zohar, 3 Beresheet b60.
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Genesis 6 Giants: The Master Builders of Prehistoric and Ancient Civilizations (Bozeman, Montana: End Time
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Aliens and Fallen Angels: The Sexual Corruption of the Human Race (Bozeman,
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From the Ashes of Angels (Rochester, Vermont: Bear & Company,
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[121]  Shira Halevi,
The Life Story of Adam and Havah, Genesis  (Northvale, New Jersey: Jason Aronson, Inc., 1997), 248.
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Saltair na Rann, 1957-1960, trans. David Greene.
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Rashi, (Bereishit) Genesis 4:5, http://www.chabad.org/library/bible_cdo/aid/8168/showrashi/true (accessed Oct. 27, 2010).
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Genizah Manuscripts of Palestinian Targum to the Pentateuch Volume One, Genesis 4:8, trans. Michael L. Klein (Cincinnati:
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Literature on Adam and Eve: Collected Essays, 122, trans. Gary Anderson, Michael Stone and Johannes Tromp (Leiden: Brill,
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The Sevenfold Vengeance of Cain:
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123, trans. Gary Anderson, Michael Stone and Johannes Tromp (Leiden: Brill, 2000) 204; Hyman E. Goldin,
The Book of Legends: Tales
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