…out of the serpents root shall come forth a cockatrice.
                                                                                             - Isa. 14:29 (KJV)


The
cockatrice (or basilisk) is known to be a legendary serpent or dragon with lethal breath and
glance
.[1] Did Cain, this particular son of the Serpent, become the successor of his father?[2]

It was now time for Cain to actually go out in the world, and show his
true colors. Both Cain and Abel
were to present a sacrifice to God. These would help determine God’s favor; this was Cain’s proving
ground. Both had to give a blood sacrifice, the way God directed. This was because blood, even back
then, was probably the remission for one’s sins. Abel brought the firstlings of his flock – the best one –
slaughtered it, and offered it to God.

Cain, on the other hand, offered fruit; probably something left over (after he saved the best for himself).
He really didn’t care about offering God
the best of his earnings. On top of it, Cain went to his sacrifice
with a haughty attitude. He strutted on the scene, assumed his way was right, and presented whatever
he felt was “good enough.” He probably figured he was even
entitled to some sort of acceptance
because of his efforts!
Cain's Sacrifice and Aftermath
                                                   Copyright 2010, Brett T., All Rights Reserved.
  
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                                                                                                 Footnotes
[1]  answers.com,
basilisk, http://www.answers.com/topic/basilisk (accessed Feb. 4, 2010).
[2]  Johann Andreas Eisenmenger,
The Traditions of the Jews, Contained in the Talmud and other Mystical Writings (London: J.
Robinson, 1748), 197-8.
[3]  Louis Ginzberg,
The Legends of the Jews Volume V: Notes for Volume One and Two, III. The Ten Generations, 12, trans.
Henrietta Szold (Baltimore, Maryland: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1909), 136;
The History of al-Tabari – Volume I: General
Introduction and From the Creation to the Flood
, Cain and Abel, 140, trans. Franz Rosenthal (Albany: New York Press, 1989), 311.
[4]  
Pirke De Rabbi Eliezer, Chapter 21: Cain and Abel [25A. i.], trans. Gerald Friedlander (New York: Sepher-Hermon Press, 1981),
153-4.
[5]  G. H. Pember, M. A.,
Earth’s Earliest Ages and their Connection With Modern Spiritualism, Theosophy, and Buddhism (Grand
Rapids, Michigan: Kregel Publications, 1975), 119.
[6]  
Targum Pseudo-Jonathan (Targum of Palestine / Targum of Jonathan Ben Uzziel), On the Book of Genesis, Section 4,
Berashith, http://targum.info/pj/pjgen1-6.htm (accessed Oct. 2, 2009).
[7]  
Targum Neofiti 1: Genesis / Translated, With Apparatus and Notes, Genesis 4:8, trans. Martin McNamara (Collegeville, Minn-
esota: Liturgical Press, 1992).
[8]  Robert Graves and Raphael Patai,
Hebrew Myths: The Book of Genesis (Garden City, New York: Doubleday & Company, 1964),
91.
[9]  
The History of al-Tabari – Volume I: General Introduction and From the Creation to the Flood, Cain and Abel, 138, trans. Franz
Rosenthal (Albany: New York Press, 1989), 308.
[10]  
Yalkut Hadash (Rabbi Leo Jung, Ph. D., Fallen Angels in Jewish, Christian and Mohammedan Literature (New York: KTAV
Publishing House, 1974), 78).
[11]  
The Armenian Apocryphal Adam Literature, The History of the Repentance of Adam and Eve, the First Created Ones, and
How They Did It 46, trans. William Lowndes Lipscomb (Ann Arbor, Michigan: University Microfilms International, 1983), 228.
[12]  James R. Davis,
Have We Gone the Way of Cain?, 6-7, http://www.focusongod.com/cain (accessed March 3, 2001) 60.
[13]  S. Baring-Gould,
Legends of the Patriarchs and Prophets and Other Old Testament Characters (New York: American Book
Exchange, 1881), 76.
[14]  
The Armenian Apocryphal Adam Literature, This is the History of Abel and Cain the sons of Adam 36, History of Cain and
Abel 37, trans. William Lowndes Lipscomb (Ann Arbor, Michigan: University Microfilms International, 1983), 165, 271.
[15]  Louis Ginzberg,
The Legends of the Jews Volume I: From the Creation to Jacob, trans. Henrietta Szold (Baltimore, Maryland:
The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1909), 111.
[16]  J. Preston Eby,
The World System, 3, http://www.theshop.net/giess/world.html (accessed Aug. 17, 2000 4); The Book of the
Cave of Treasures
, The First Thousand Years: Adam to Yared (Jared), Adam’s Expulsion from Paradise, trans. Sir E. A. Wallis
Budge (London: The Religious Tract Society, 1927), 68-70;
The World Before the Flood, and the History of the Patriarchs:
Chapter 1, 7
, http://www.adamqadmon.com/watchers/pre-flood000.html (accessed Feb. 10, 2001 184); Moses Aberbach and
Bernard Grossfield,
Targum Onkelos to Genesis: A Critical Analysis Together with an English Translation of the Text, Genesis
4:16 (KTAV Publishing House, Inc., 1995), 42.
[17]  Jude 1:13 (Mrs. Sydney Bristowe,
Sargon the Magnificent (London: The Covenant Publishing Co., 1927), 153).
[18]  Josephus,
Jewish Antiquities, Book 1, 59-64, trans. H. ST. J. Thackeray (London: William Heinemann Ltd. 1961), 29.
[19]  
The Midrash Rabbah, Bereshith (Genesis) 22:13, trans. Rabbi Dr. H. Freedman and Maurice Simon (London: The Soncino
Press, 1961).
[20]  Robert Bowie Johnson, Jr.,
The Parthenon Code: Mankind’s History in Marble (Annapolis, Maryland: Solving Light Books,
2004), 17.
[21]  William F. Dankenbring,
The Mark of Cain, 5, http://www.triumphpro.com/the_mark_of_cain.htm (accessed Aug. 22, 2007
230).
[22]  William F. Dankenbring,
The Mark of Cain, 3, http://www.triumphpro.com/the_mark_of_cain.htm (accessed Aug. 22, 2007
230).
[23]  Jude 1:11 (notes) (KJV (
The Schofield Reference Bible)).
[24]  Mrs. Sydney Bristowe,
Sargon the Magnificent (London: The Covenant Publishing Co., 1927), 63.
[25]  Mrs. Sydney Bristowe,
Sargon the Magnificent (London: The Covenant Publishing Co., 1927), 117.
[26]  Mrs. Sydney Bristowe,
Sargon the Magnificent (London: The Covenant Publishing Co., 1927), 151; E. S. G. Bristowe, Cain -
An Argument
(Leicester: Edgar Backus, 1950), 45.
[27]  Philip Gardiner,
Secrets of the Serpent: in Search of the Secret Past (Foresthill Ca: Reality press, 2006), 42.
[28]  E. S. G. Bristowe,
Cain - An Argument (Leicester: Edgar Backus, 1950), 45.
[29]  E. S. G. Bristowe,
Cain - An Argument (Leicester: Edgar Backus, 1950), 127.
[30]  Mrs. Sydney Bristowe,
Sargon the Magnificent (London: The Covenant Publishing Co., 1927), 80-1.
[31]  Robert Bowie Johnson, Jr.,
The Parthenon Code: Mankind’s History in Marble (Annapolis, Maryland: Solving Light Books,
2004), 244.
[32]  Robert Bowie Johnson, Jr.,
The Parthenon Code: Mankind’s History in Marble (Annapolis, Maryland: Solving Light Books,
2004), 7.
[33]  Louis Ginzberg,
The Legends of the Jews Volume I: From the Creation to Jacob, trans. Henrietta Szold (Baltimore, Maryland:
The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1909), 105.
[34]  S. Baring-Gould,
Legends of the Patriarchs and Prophets and Other Old Testament Characters (New York: American Book
Exchange, 1881), 75.
[35]  Louis Ginzberg,
The Legends of the Jews Volume I: From the Creation to Jacob, trans. Henrietta Szold (Baltimore, Maryland:
The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1909), 115.
[36]  
Pseudo - Philo (The Biblical Antiquities of Philo), 2:3-4, trans. M. R. James (1917), http://www.sacred-texts.com/bib/bap/bap19.
htm (accessed July 13, 2006); Mrs. Sydney Bristowe,
Sargon the Magnificent (London: The Covenant Publishing Co., 1927), 151.
[37]  
The Chronicles of Jerahmeel (The Hebrew Bible Historiale), 26:11, trans. M. Gaster, Ph. D. (London: The Royal Asiatic
Society, 1899), 55.
[38]  Genesis 4:17 (KJV); E. S. G. Bristowe,
Cain - An Argument (Leicester: Edgar Backus, 1950), 5, 9; Mrs. Sydney Bristowe,
Sargon the Magnificent (London: The Covenant Publishing Co., 1927), 27, 53-4, 72, 80, 150; Mysterious World: Ah, Osiria!
Part III: Nimrod Hunting
, 13, http://www.mysteriousworld.com/Journal/2003/Autumn/Osiria/ (accessed July 12, 2007 207).
[39]  Josephus,
Jewish Antiquities, Book 1, 59-64, trans. H. ST. J. Thackeray (London: William Heinemann Ltd. 1961), 29; The
Chronicles of Jerahmeel (The Hebrew Bible Historiale)
, 24:1, trans. M. Gaster, Ph. D. (London: The Royal Asiatic Society, 1899),
50.
[40]  Mrs. Sydney Bristowe,
Sargon the Magnificent (London: The Covenant Publishing Co., 1927), 129; James L. Kugel,
Traditions of the Bible (Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press, 1998), 169.
[41]  Mrs. Sydney Bristowe,
Sargon the Magnificent (London: The Covenant Publishing Co., 1927), 129.
The people who flocked to these cities lived luxuriously, exploiting whatever natural resources they had
around them. They concentrated on any ways they could to increase their material wealth.[39] When
Cain's empire finally dissolved, sometime before the flood of Noah, many would begin to spread out,
throughout the ancient lands of their day. They probably passed on Cain’s ways and religion to every-
one they could.[40]


…Cain was the human original of the Sun-god whose followers wandered into every climate, carrying
with them the culture of the ancient Babylonians and the leaven of malice and wickedness as well.
                                                                                   (Bristowe, 1927, p. 129)[41]


Now, we see how Cain and the Serpent influenced the entire human race by this time. How much could
the other fallen angels expand upon these influences,
as well; inundating the world with “more of the
same?”
He also began to learn how to manipulate people on
a grand scale, and physically conquer them. He probably learned these ways from his true father: the
Serpent. What he adopted from this angel probably set up the first semblance of a religious counter-
belief in our world.[21] Cain, as well, began to concentrate on all the materialism the world had to offer.
He used the occult knowledge his father possessed, to gather any and all of his own divine guidance
and self-gratification… all without God.

God, in fact, was now their
enemy. This counter-religion of Cain and the Serpent would allow them to
establish a whole counter-religion, and empire, over anyone around them. Cain truly was a very cunning
man, like the Serpent: a great leader of men into these “wicked courses.”[22]


Cain, type of the religious natural man, who believes in a God, and in “religion,” but after his own will,
and who rejects redemption by blood… the apostate teacher explains it away.
                                                                - Schofield Reference Bible Jude 1:11 (notes)[23]

Did not the pagans by attributing God-like qualities to men, change “the un-corruptible God into an
image made like to corruptible man?”
                                                        (Bristowe, 1927, p. 63)[24]


Cain would establish this counter-belief system based on
whatever he found around him:


…Cain introduced that knowledge, and used it as the basis of idolatry by ascribing Divine attributes to
the gods of his own invention.
                                                               (Bristowe, 1927, p. 117)[25]


This dominion began to spread, in all directions, under the cloak of this new religious belief. In the past,
for example, we know that the words
son and sun were close in meaning. Simply, a rounded disk (such
as the sun) was also a symbol of one’s own son (or, also, some type of
reincarnated soul).[26] Whenever we
hear of the
Sun-god, we now know it also could have meant the son of someone special. One of the first and
most famous "sons" of this early time was Cain:
son of the Serpent.[27] People would eventually worship
Cain as the great Sun-god:


...the founder of the Babylonian empire was Cain and that he was flimsily disguised in mythology as
Merodach, or Marduk the Sun-god who, together with Bel (a.k.a. the Serpent), was worshipped in
Babylon up to the end of that city.
                                                      (Bristowe, 1950, p. 45)[28]


Interestingly, there are many ancient people who considered themselves Children of the
Sun. Could they
be right? Could these people truly be the descendents of Cain, in one way or another? Could they, at
least, be among those who adopted this sun-god’s “ways?”


…if Cain… was the human original of the Babylonian Sun-god whose followers spread a high grade of
civilization all over the ancient world, the nature of the religion which accompanies that civilization
witnesses against him.
                                                                        (Bristowe, 1927, p. 127)[29]


He began to instruct others to, not only venerate the Serpent, but Adam and Eve, as well. From ancient
works of the past, we find that Cain had a good deal of respect for Adam and Eve; especially his
mother. One of his first moves was to convert them all into
gods and goddesses. This was probably the
true origin of ancestor-worship - a widely held belief of many ancient pagan cultures. In fact, the whole story
of Cain’s life was probably the origin of most pagan religions and mythological accounts; from all over the
world!


Nebuchadnezzar calls Merodach in inscriptions “the first-born, the glorious, the first-born of the gods…
Since Anu represents Adam, and Ea and Ishtar represent Eve, who could Merodach their eldest born
have represented but Cain?
                                                                (Bristowe, 1927, p. 80-1)[30]


The god
Merodach was even mentioned in the Bible. We now see a major antagonist in the Bible was
now considered one of the many heroes of this pagan religion, started by Cain. These mythological
gods were absorbed into many ancient cultures and lands; and continued on, throughout history.

Famous throughout ancient mythology, the “wisdom of the serpent” seems to have origins in the Garden
of Eden. According to Cain, the knowledge that
the Serpent brought to mankind (via the Garden) is what
people should venerate; not God. Through Eve’s sexual activity and sure willingness of heart, she
acquired the “Knowledge of Good and Evil.” This was the point the
Serpent gave divine “knowledge” to
mankind.[31] The knowledge was truly a benefit to mankind, not a curse:


…(ancient) Greek poets and artists are telling us the same story from an opposite viewpoint – one that
says that the serpent did not delude Adam and Eve in the ancient garden, but rather, enlightened them.
                                                                                       (Johnson, 2004, p. 7)[32]


In fact, the whole incident of the Garden was twisted by pagan accounts - to the opposite extreme: bad
was good, up was down. This moment of fornication and adoption of the Serpent’s filth and knowledge
was “enlightenment!” God did not want a lot of this hidden knowledge of the fallen angels to be acquired
by human beings. These ideologies, according to Cain and the Serpent, allowed a person their own
spiritual “pathway to the divine.” Now, there was another
division laid out, not only as far as seed line,
but in a religious sense. People had a choice: to either follow the pagan ways of Cain and the Serpent,
or follow the ways of God.

Adam, Eve, the Serpent, and Cain himself were the real “gods.” Ancestor worship was the norm; the
Serpent’s “enlightenment” was the proper pathway towards reaching the divine.


…Cain… (was) the ancestor of all the impious generations that were rebellious toward God, and rose
up against Him.
                                                                     (Ginzberg, 1909, p. 105)[33]


The innocent, tent-dwelling lives of Adam, Eve, and the rest of the people were coming to an end.[34]
The simple lifestyles of those around Cain were going to be a lot more complicated. The desire of Cain to
strip the land, to build things, as well as to possess material things - i.e. to establish an empire - had become
one of the foremost in Cain’s mind. From this, we’ll see one more undertaking that originated with Cain;
something large. Not only would Cain begin to control people through his Serpent-based religion, he also
strengthened his control through the first political
empire. On top of this, he began his empire by building
something monumental:


Gen. 4:
16 And Cain went out from the presence of the LORD, and dwelt
    in the land of Nod, on the east of Eden.
17 And Cain knew his wife; and she conceived, and bare Enoch:
    and he builded a city…


It’s obvious, Cain did not want to wander at all; he wanted to immortalize himself and his descendants
through the building a city.[35] This, interestingly enough, seems to further prove there were more
people on the earth at this early time. A city is a lot to build for just Adam, Eve, Cain, and his brothers
and sisters - where did all the people come from who helped build this city? We are not talking about a
house, here, or even a couple of neighborhoods; but a
city.[36]

Ancient sources state that Cain also conquered land around him. It seems obvious there were other
groups of people who adopted the “ways” of Cain, and helped him to build this city. Some sources stated
that Cain not only built one city, but seven.[37] Cain built a city near the Garden of Eden, named
Eridu.
Beyond Eridu, there were more:
Ur, Enoch, for example; and, especially, the most famous one of them
all -
BABYLON.[38]

How cocky. How arrogant of Cain. He thought he
could overcome God and his punishment. In fact,
he strived to do the opposite: he settled in one
place, and concentrated on ways to further his own
self-glorification.[20] He did accomplish a lot in his life,
however, even though it wasn’t what he was sup-
posed to do. Through his actions, Cain would affect
our world more than most of us would ever believe.
Not only would he
physically walk his own way, he
was the first to,
spiritually, go his own way (as far as
morality or religious theology).
lessness,” “wandering,” or “exile.” He was to wander until he died on his own. Cain still wasn’t really
repentant; so, because of this attitude, he was to continue on - to live a lonely, miserable life.[16]

In order to not allow anyone to stifle His plans, God not only declared the prophecy of Genesis 3:15, but
delivered another proclamation - a warning to anyone who interfered with Cain’s punishment:


And the LORD said unto him, Therefore whosoever slayeth Cain, vengeance shall be taken on him
sevenfold…
                                                                        - Gen. 4:15 (KJV)


In other words, if anyone interrupted this penance of Cain, his generations would be punished for a very
long time – seventy-seven subsequent generations, to be exact! This would be a seventy-seven gener-
ation curse on the descendants of any person who violated His proclamation - and killed Cain.

Wow. God means business. Again, this was actually an order of protection for His intent:
nobody was
to kill Cain before his time, all to make sure Cain lived long enough to think about what he did.

As we research ancient texts further, we could assume that Cain
opposed his punishment in, oh, so
many ways; and ended up striving for the
opposite. He used almost every tool he had, not to remain
humble and reflective, but
magnify his own ways of life! We’ll soon look at what Cain did to influence
the world around him, and how he brought other people to follow these same ways. We’ll also discover
how there would be members of his
own family that contributed to his own downfall!


Was not Cain the foremost of all the “wandering stars for which the blackness of darkness hath been
reserved for ever?”
                                                                (Bristowe, 1927, p. 153)[17]


Cain, his descendants, and other people around him, began to fall under the domain of these “ways of
life:” playing “the victim,” maintaining an “entitlement mentality,” possessing cynical, pompous attitudes,
etc. Many subsequent generations would go on to fulfill one half of this Genesis 3:15 Prophecy - either
in blood or spirit. Many of these people would actually be the descendants of the Serpent (through Cain),
and oppose Adam and what he stands for. We now will begin to look at the pathways Cain chose to
walk, where he ended up, and how he was able to influence so many people around him.

We already know Cain did not want to accept his punishment.[18] He didn’t follow God’s commandment
for too long.


  
         …he threw the words behind him and went out, like one who would deceive the Almighty.
                                                                                       - Genesis Rabbah 22:13[19]

Now, Cain had to make his way in his brave new world.
As Cain began to leave, he still considered God as mean
and unfair. He created the world, yet He couldn’t do any-
thing as simple as to overlook this simple act? God ban-
ished Adam and Eve from the Garden; now He was going
to banish Cain – how cruel of a God could He be? Couldn’t
He just absorb this crime (Ginzberg, 1909, p. 111)?[15]
God forced him to the land of
Nod, a name which means “rest-
Some of Cain’s thoughts were of remorse. The majority, however, was bent on rationalizing it all away.
He ran from the scene, but could not run away from God. God confronted Cain, and a conversation arose:


And the LORD said unto Cain, Where [is] Abel thy brother? And he said, I know not: [Am] I my brother's
keeper?
                                                                                      - Gen. 4:9 (KJV)


Cain lied, right out of the starting gate. God knew he killed Abel, and, most importantly,
Cain knew he
killed Abel. He subtly tried to get out of his shame using the “I didn’t know” approach.[11] Cain also
claimed he never saw a human being die before, so how was he supposed to know the way he struck
his brother would take his life? He also took the “victim” mentality – the whole thing wasn't
really his fault.
Actually, according to Cain, it was, more or less,
God’s fault, because his own offering wasn’t accepted.
God should have understood. As we clearly see, some people are truly sorry for their crimes; some
people are only sorry
they got caught – this occurs within a person’s twisted, self-centered rationale.
This was Cain to a tee. Cain did whatever he could to weasel his way out of this crime.

Everyone else in the world knew he meant to kill Abel; God also wasn’t buying it. Cain’s punishment was
upon him. He was now destined to wander the earth, alone, and without peace - all to make him reflect
on what he did. We have an interesting commentary on those, today, who may think in much of this
same way:


(…you have) no reason to feel guilty. Your heart continues to tell you that you are the center of the
universe. Your problems are somebody else’s fault. This world owes you happiness. You are basically
good and unselfish. You’ll be happy if you get what you want. You will be happy when you follow your
own heart… You are under a curse.
                   (“Have We Gone the Way of Cain?”, n. d., p. 6-7)[12]


What curse is this: the
Curse of Cain? Could these ways of thought we see so much today have origin-
ated from Cain, the “seed of the Serpent?”


  …the penitence of Cain… was not sincere. He was filled with remorse, but it was mingled with envy
  and hatred…                                                                         (Baring-Gould, 1881, p. 76)[13]


God was hoping Cain would cry out, repent, or, at least, feel a
little guilty, so He could give him a little
compassion.[14] Instead, the opposite was true. God wasn’t buying Cain’s attempt at manipulation, here.
He had to show some responsibility for his actions. Because of his lack of responsibility, the time had
now come for Cain to accept his place in this murder, whether he believed he deserved it or not. Cain
had a lot of “tricks up his sleeve.” And why not? He had blood of an intelligent, crafty angel!

God wasn’t going to let him get away with any more. It was time to leave:


  And Cain went out from the presence of the LORD, and dwelt in the land of Nod, on the east of Eden.
                                                                                               - Gen. 4:16 (KJV)
These thoughts of vanity and superiority obviously were how the Serpent would probably have acted.
The two – Abel and Cain - seemed to have different approaches, different attitudes, and different out-
looks on life. As most would know, there were flaws in Cain’s perception about what God truly wanted;
as well what ways truly were wrong or right. Abel did the opposite: he took the best of his lambs, turned
it into a blood sacrifice, and did things exactly how God wanted - all with a sense of humility and rev-
erence to his Creator. Cain offered haughtily; Abel offered with humility.[3] As a predictable result, Abel’s
sacrifice was accepted; Cain’s wasn’t.[4] Obviously, each had a different,
internal guiding-factor behind
their outward actions, which gave the expected results:


Gen. 4:
4 And Abel, he also brought of the firstlings of his flock and of the
  fat thereof. And the LORD had respect unto Abel and to his offering.
5 But unto Cain and to his offering he had not respect.


Cain’s outlook on the world was so strange! Cain enjoyed the material things of the ground; he was too
proud to follow anyone else; he allowed his own
free will and his own entitlement mentality to tell him
what he should do. This was the first outward act of self-indulgence in the world since the Garden:
pleasing
one’s self over God or looking to other things in the world for one’s own gratification. Cain valued
his own interpretations over God’s obligations.

No matter what circumstances surrounded Cain’s effort, the denial of his sacrifice angered him to the
utmost. According to him, God treated him unfairly. God noticed Cain developing an attitude, and went
to confront him:


            And the LORD said unto Cain, Why art thou wroth? And why is thy countenance fallen?
                                                                                              - Gen. 4:6 (KJV)


Although Cain probably knew what God expected, and that he could have chosen the right ways, he
began to go forward with those thoughts and emotions he had brewing on the inside.[5] Unlike Abel,
he began to follow those negative attributes of his blood-born ancestor – the Serpent. Disgusted with
his “treatment,” Cain went to Abel about his situation, and openly griped.


"…I perceive that the world was created in goodness, but it is not governed according to the fruit of
good works, for there is respect to persons in judgment; therefore it is that thy offering was accepted,
and mine not accepted with good will."
                                           - Targum Pseudo-Jonathan IV[6]


Cain further griped:


"…the world was not created in mercy and that it is not being conducted according to the fruits of good
words, and that there is favoritism in judgment."
                                    - Targum Neofiti Gen. 4:8[7]


In other words, “God did
me wrong.” Continually assuming he was right, Cain continued: “The entire
process is not fair. We’re all the same; our sacrifices were both the same; it all depends on how we look
at it. At least, I gave Him something. The whole attempt seemed good enough for
me. Mine was just not
accepted for some unfair reason.” Abel, however, had some honest words for his brother: “Mine was
accepted because I love God; yours was rejected because you hate Him.”[8] Abel told him the
truth,
and why his sacrifice wasn’t accepted – no “political correctness” here.

Cain did not like this at all. It only prompted him to more anger; so much, in fact, it allowed him to act on
some really dark emotions.[9]


                      This evil in Cain (which destroys alike soul and body) caused him to kill Abel.
                                                                                                   - Yalkut Hadash[10]


Mad enough as Cain was, the attempted murder of his brother would be no accident. The two began to
wrestle. Abel could have even held him down, and defeated him. But, as a show of mercy, Abel let up his
grip. Cain took advantage of this kindness, and took a stick, rock, or other tool, and hit Abel. He hit, and
hit, and hit his brother, doing whatever he could to take his life.


And Cain talked with Abel his brother: and it came to pass, when they were in the field, that Cain rose up
against Abel his brother, and slew him.
                                                    - Gen. 4:8 (KJV)