Old Religion of Cush & Nimrod
















We must recall, there was one event which took place aboard the ark; an event regarding Ham and his wife,
as they were proceeding through the flood. This event may have passed right by us, seemingly
insignificant to the last section. Now, however, it comes back into play - in a major way.

We recall there was a child of Ham’s wife, sired by an individual who was, either of a strong angelic
bloodline, or of Cainite blood; or
both. The problem with this was that a number of top terrestrial angels,
just before the flood, realized the end of their existence was near; and tried desperately to sneak some of
their seed aboard the ark - in any manner possible. God only wanted
certain individuals aboard the ark;
and descendants of these top terrestrial angels surely were
not on His list.

We recall this child was sneaked aboard the ark, inside her mother's womb, because Ham’s wife was
impregnated by someone, other than her husband, who had this "forbidden blood." We also recall that Ham
had to “cross the line,” while aboard the ark, to be able to cohabit with his wife (and to hide any possible
shame that might accompany this reality). Just who was this child? What was his name? And, why would
he become so important,
now?

Yes, it seems that a child was born aboard the ark. And yes, he does become extremely significant in this
post-flood world. If we think about it: this child was “hidden” in the ark, as well - hidden from Noah (and
almost everyone aboard the ark). In a way, this sounds a lot like the god
Saturn – i.e. “the Hidden One.”
It shouldn't come as too much of a surprise, because this baby (that Ham claimed as his own) would,
eventually, take over the “mantle” of all of Ham's authority! Yes, this child was none other than a not-so-
famous patriarch of the book of Genesis:
Cush.

Yes, this
Cush who would, eventually, orchestrate “the reestablishment of the way of Cain after the flood” -
on a scale never seen before![1]

Greek Views of the Post-Flood World
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                                                                                                      Footnotes:
[1]  Robert Bowie Johnson, Jr.,
Athena and Kain: The True Meaning of Greek Myth (Annapolis, Maryland: Solving Light Books, 2003),
114, 187.
[2]  
Forgotten History of the Western World,  64.
[3]  Robert Bowie Johnson, Jr.,
The Parthenon Code: Mankind’s History in Marble (Annapolis, Maryland: Solving Light Books, 2004), 19.
[4]  Robert Bowie Johnson, Jr.,
The Parthenon Code: Mankind’s History in Marble (Annapolis, Maryland: Solving Light Books, 2004), 60.
[5]  Robert Bowie Johnson, Jr.,
The Parthenon Code: Mankind’s History in Marble (Annapolis, Maryland: Solving Light Books, 2004), 12.
[6]  Robert Bowie Johnson, Jr.,
The Parthenon Code: Mankind’s History in Marble (Annapolis, Maryland: Solving Light Books, 2004), 74..
[7]  Robert Bowie Johnson, Jr.,
Athena and Kain: The True Meaning of Greek Myth (Annapolis, Maryland: Solving Light Books, 2003),
15.
[8]  Robert Bowie Johnson, Jr.,
The Parthenon Code: Mankind’s History in Marble (Annapolis, Maryland: Solving Light Books, 2004), 72.
[9]  Robert Bowie Johnson, Jr.,
The Parthenon Code: Mankind’s History in Marble (Annapolis, Maryland: Solving Light Books, 2004), 72.
[10]  Robert Bowie Johnson, Jr.,
The Parthenon Code: Mankind’s History in Marble (Annapolis, Maryland: Solving Light Books, 2004), 72,
176.
[11]  Robert Bowie Johnson, Jr.,
The Parthenon Code: Mankind’s History in Marble (Annapolis, Maryland: Solving Light Books, 2004),
111.
[12]  Robert Bowie Johnson, Jr.,
The Parthenon Code: Mankind’s History in Marble (Annapolis, Maryland: Solving Light Books, 2004), 35.
[13]  
Forgotten History of the Western World, 38, 49, 59.
[14]  
Forgotten History of the Western World, 49.
[15]  Robert Bowie Johnson, Jr.,
Athena and Kain: The True Meaning of Greek Myth (Annapolis, Maryland: Solving Light Books, 2003), 82.
[16]  Robert Bowie Johnson, Jr.,
The Parthenon Code: Mankind’s History in Marble (Annapolis, Maryland: Solving Light Books, 2004), 74.
[17]  Robert Bowie Johnson, Jr.,
The Parthenon Code: Mankind’s History in Marble (Annapolis, Maryland: Solving Light Books, 2004), 114;
Robert Bowie Johnson, Jr.,
Athena and Eden: The Hidden Meaning of he Parthenon’s East Facade (Annapolis, Maryland: Solving Light
Books, 2002), 26.
[18]  Robert Bowie Johnson, Jr.,
Athena and Kain: The True Meaning of Greek Myth (Annapolis, Maryland: Solving Light Books, 2003),
124.
[19]  Robert Bowie Johnson, Jr.,
The Parthenon Code: Mankind’s History in Marble (Annapolis, Maryland: Solving Light Books, 2004),
114.
[20]  Robert Bowie Johnson, Jr.,
The Parthenon Code: Mankind’s History in Marble (Annapolis, Maryland: Solving Light Books, 2004),
110, 112.
[21]  Robert Bowie Johnson, Jr.,
Athena and Eden: The Hidden Meaning of he Parthenon’s East Facade (Annapolis, Maryland: Solving
Light Books, 2002), 26.
[22]  Robert Bowie Johnson, Jr.,
The Parthenon Code: Mankind’s History in Marble (Annapolis, Maryland: Solving Light Books, 2004),
114.
[23]  Robert Bowie Johnson, Jr.,
The Parthenon Code: Mankind’s History in Marble (Annapolis, Maryland: Solving Light Books, 2004),
55; Robert Bowie Johnson, Jr.,
Athena and Kain: The True Meaning of Greek Myth (Annapolis, Maryland: Solving Light Books, 2003),
122; Robert Bowie Johnson, Jr.,
Athena and Eden: The Hidden Meaning of he Parthenon’s East Facade (Annapolis, Maryland: Solving
Light Books, 2002), 46.
[24]  
Inigo Jones Manuscript, 5, http://www.freemasonry.com/masonic_manuscripts_jones.html (accessed May 24, 2011); 214  3.
[25]  Robert Bowie Johnson, Jr.,
Athena and Eden: The Hidden Meaning of he Parthenon’s East Facade (Annapolis, Maryland: Solving
Light Books, 2002), 61.
[26]  Robert Bowie Johnson, Jr.,
The Parthenon Code: Mankind’s History in Marble (Annapolis, Maryland: Solving Light Books, 2004), 40.
[27]  Robert Bowie Johnson, Jr.,
The Parthenon Code: Mankind’s History in Marble (Annapolis, Maryland: Solving Light Books, 2004), 40.
[28]  http://12tribehistory.com/what-really-happened-after-the-flood/
[29]  Robert Bowie Johnson, Jr.,
Athena and Eden: The Hidden Meaning of he Parthenon’s East Facade (Annapolis, Maryland: Solving
Light Books, 2002), 60.
[30]  Robert Bowie Johnson, Jr.,
Athena and Eden: The Hidden Meaning of he Parthenon’s East Facade (Annapolis, Maryland: Solving
Light Books, 2002), 60.
[31]  Robert Bowie Johnson, Jr.,
Athena and Eden: The Hidden Meaning of he Parthenon’s East Facade (Annapolis, Maryland: Solving
Light Books, 2002), 60.
[32]  
The Writings of Abraham, Chapter 18, http://www.earth-history.com/Pseudepigrapha/Mormonism/writings-abraham-1.htm (accessed
May 10, 2007).
[33]  Robert Bowie Johnson, Jr.,
The Parthenon Code: Mankind’s History in Marble (Annapolis, Maryland: Solving Light Books, 2004), 55,
110;  
Inigo Jones Manuscript, 5, http://www.freemasonry.com/masonic_manuscripts_jones.html (accessed May 24, 2011).
[34]  Robert Bowie Johnson, Jr.,
Athena and Eden: The Hidden Meaning of he Parthenon’s East Facade (Annapolis, Maryland: Solving
Light Books, 2002), 46.
[35]  Robert Bowie Johnson, Jr.,
The Parthenon Code: Mankind’s History in Marble (Annapolis, Maryland: Solving Light Books, 2004),
114.
[36]  Robert Bowie Johnson, Jr.,
The Parthenon Code: Mankind’s History in Marble (Annapolis, Maryland: Solving Light Books, 2004), 16.
[37]  Robert Bowie Johnson, Jr.,
The Parthenon Code: Mankind’s History in Marble (Annapolis, Maryland: Solving Light Books, 2004),
191.
[38]  
Humanism, World English Dictionary, http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/humanism, 07/21/14.
[39]  Robert Bowie Johnson, Jr.,
The Parthenon Code: Mankind’s History in Marble (Annapolis, Maryland: Solving Light Books, 2004),
118.
[40]  Stephen Charles Bandy,
Caines Cynn: A Study of Beuwolf and the Legends of Cain (Stephen Charles Bandy, 1967), 161.
[41]  
The Works of Philo Judaeus, Questions and Answers II, 83- (81), trans. C. D. Yonge (London: H. G. Bohn, 1854-5).
[42]  
The Works of Philo Judaeus, Questions and Answers II, 83- (81), trans. C. D. Yonge (London: H. G. Bohn, 1854-5).
[43] 122 14.
[44]  Robert Bowie Johnson, Jr.,
The Parthenon Code: Mankind’s History in Marble (Annapolis, Maryland: Solving Light Books, 2004),
220.
[45]  
Nimrod: Man, Maniac or Myth?, 2, http://essaysbyekowa.com/Nimrod.htm (accessed March 22, 2011).
[46]  
The Book of Jasher 7:23.
[47]  
The Book of Jasher 7:23.
[48]  
The Book of Jasher, 7:24-29, trans. Albinus Alcuin (Pomeroy, Washington: Health Research, 1966),.
[49]  Mendel G. Glenn,
Jewish Tales and Legends (New York: Star Hebrew Book Co., 1929), 29.
[50]  Howard Schwartz,
Tree of Souls: The Mythology of Judaism (Oxford: University Press, 2004), 437.
[51]  207 10.
[52]  
Saltair na Rann, , trans. David Greene, 2693-96.
[53]  
The Book of Jasher, 7:30, trans. Albinus Alcuin (Pomeroy, Washington: Health Research, 1966), 17.
(54) 203 2.
[55]  Mendel G. Glenn,
Jewish Tales and Legends (New York: Star Hebrew Book Co., 1929), 30.
[56]  
Nimrod: Man, Maniac or Myth?, 13, http://essaysbyekowa.com/Nimrod.htm (accessed March 22, 2011).
[57]  
Nimrod: King of the World, 3, http://www.iwc.net/~levi/nimrod.htm (accessed June 2, 2000).
[58]  
Nimrod: King of the World, 3, http://www.iwc.net/~levi/nimrod.htm (accessed June 2, 2000).
[59)  Alexander Hislop,
The Two Babylons or the Papal Worship: Proved to be the Worship of Nimrod and His Wife (Neptune, New
Jersey: Loizeaux Brothers, 1916), 23.
[60]  
The Book of Jasher 7.
[61]  203 2.
[62]  
The Book of Jasher 7.
[63]  
St. Ephrem the Syrian: Selected Prose Works, Section VIII 1(2), trans. Edward G. Mathews, Jr. and Joseph P. Amar (Washington,
D. C.: The Catholic University of America Press, 1994), 146-147.
[64]  
The Book of Jasher 7.
[65]  
Ancient Post-Flood 135.
[66]  
St. Ephrem the Syrian: Selected Prose Works, Section VIII 1(2), trans. Edward G. Mathews, Jr. and Joseph P. Amar (Washington,
D. C.: The Catholic University of America Press, 1994), 146.
[67]  207 2.
[68]  
Babylonian Paganism Becomes Trinitarian Christianity, 1, http://www.montana.com/bupc/whores/babypag.html (accessed May 7,
2000).
[69]  2F1.
[70]  
The Book of Jasher 7:39.
[71]  203 2; Mendel G. Glenn,
Jewish Tales and Legends (New York: Star Hebrew Book Co., 1929), 30.
[72]  
Pseudo-Philo 4 7.
[73]  C. J. Verduin,
Looking for Jonitus, 14, http://leidenuniv.nl/fsw/verduin/jonitus/jonitus.htm (accessed Aug. 1, 2005).
[74]  203 2.
[75]  
Nimrod: King of the World, 4, http://www.iwc.net/~levi/nimrod.htm (accessed June 2, 2000).
[76]  207 2.
[77]  3, http://www.piney.com/MuBabylo.html.
(78)  
Babylonian Paganism Becomes Trinitarian Christianity, 1, http://www.montana.com/bupc/whores/babypag.html (accessed May 7,
2000).
[79]  
Babylonian Paganism Becomes Trinitarian Christianity, 1, http://www.montana.com/bupc/whores/babypag.html (accessed May 7,
2000).
[80]  
Babylonian Paganism Becomes Trinitarian Christianity, 1, http://www.montana.com/bupc/whores/babypag.html (accessed May 7,
2000); 2C1.
[81]  
The Book of Jasher, 6:19, trans. Albinus Alcuin (Pomeroy, Washington: Health Research, 1966), 14.
[82]  
The Writings of Abraham, Chapter 23 3, http://www.earth-history.com/Pseudepigrapha/Mormonism/writings-abraham-1.htm
(accessed May 10, 2007).
[83]  
Nimrod: Man, Maniac or Myth?, 13, http://essaysbyekowa.com/Nimrod.htm (accessed March 22, 2011).
[84]  
Babylonian Paganism Becomes Trinitarian Christianity, 1, http://www.montana.com/bupc/whores/babypag.html (accessed May 7,
2000); 2C1.
[85]  Mendel G. Glenn,
Jewish Tales and Legends (New York: Star Hebrew Book Co., 1929), 30.
[86]  
The Second Book of Adam and Eve (The Conflict of Adam and Eve with Satan), Book II, 5:11, trans. S. C. Malan (London: Williams
and Norgate, 1882), 64
[87]  
The Works of Philo Judaeus, On the Giants 15, 66-67, trans. C. D. Yonge (London: H. G. Bohn, 1854-5).
[88]  http://www.piney.com/MuBabylo.html.
[89]  
The Works of Philo Judaeus, On the Giants 15, 65-66, trans. C. D. Yonge (London: H. G. Bohn, 1854-5).
[90] 2C2.
[91]  
The Works of Philo Judaeus, Questions and Answers II, 83- , trans. C. D. Yonge (London: H. G. Bohn, 1854-5).
[92]  
Nimrod: Man, Maniac or Myth?, 12-13, http://essaysbyekowa.com/Nimrod.htm (accessed March 22, 2011); 203 p. 15; The Zohar,
4 Noach 40;
Babel, Nimrod, Architect of the Tower of Babel, 1, http://www.cwd.co.uk/babel.htm (accessed May 11, 2000); Ralph Edward
Woodrow,
Babylon Mystery Religion: Ancient and Modern (Riverside, California: Ralph Woodrow Evangelistic Association, Inc., 1966), 3.
[93]  
Nimrod: Man, Maniac or Myth?, 13, http://essaysbyekowa.com/Nimrod.htm (accessed March 22, 2011).
[94]  Mendel G. Glenn,
Jewish Tales and Legends (New York: Star Hebrew Book Co., 1929), 30.
[95]  Mendel G. Glenn,
Jewish Tales and Legends (New York: Star Hebrew Book Co., 1929), 30.
[96]  
Nimrod: King of the World, 5, http://www.iwc.net/~levi/nimrod.htm (accessed June 2, 2000).
[97]  San 109a, http://www.halakhah.com/sanhedrin/sanhedrin_109.html.
[98]  Bentley Layton,
The Gnostic Scriptures, 39.3.3 (New York: Doubleday, 1995), 189.
[99]  207 3.
[100]  Bryce Self,
Semiramis, Queen of Babylon, 1, http://www.ldolphin.org/semir.html (accessed June 20, 2000).
[101]
The Zohar, 4 Noach, 42, Verse 338.
[102]  207 3.
[103]  Drusilla Dunjee Houston,
Wonderful Ethiopians of the Ancient Cushite Empire (1926), 166.
[104]  Drusilla Dunjee Houston,
Wonderful Ethiopians of the Ancient Cushite Empire (1926), 166.
[105]  
Nimrod: King of the World, 4, http://www.iwc.net/~levi/nimrod.htm (accessed June 2, 2000).
[106]  
Annius.
[107]  Drusilla Dunjee Houston,
Wonderful Ethiopians of the Ancient Cushite Empire (1926), 161-62.
[108]  
Naamah and Nimrod, 207 5.
[109]  164 2.
[110]  
Nimrod: King of the World, 5, http://www.iwc.net/~levi/nimrod.htm (accessed June 2, 2000).
[111]  
Pseudo-Philo 6:2.
[112]  James L. Kugel,
Traditions of the Bible (Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press, 1998), 240.
[113]  Dudley F. Cates,
The Rise and Fall of King Nimrod (Raleigh, North Carolina: Pentland Press, Inc., 1998), 52.
[114]  103.
[115]  
St. Ephrem the Syrian: Selected Prose Works, Section VIII 3, trans. Edward G. Mathews, Jr. and Joseph P. Amar (Washington,
D. C.: The Catholic University of America Press, 1994), 147.
[116]  James L. Kugel,
Traditions of the Bible (Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press, 1998), 241.
[117]  
The Book of Jasher, 9:28.
[118]  James L. Kugel,
Traditions of the Bible (Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press, 1998), 241.
[119]  San 109a, http://www.halakhah.com/sanhedrin/sanhedrin_109.html.
[120]  Jayim Nahman Bialik and Yehoshua Hana Ravnitzky,
The Book of Legends (Sefer Ha-Aggadah): Legends of the Talmud and
Midrash
, 136, (New York: Shocken Books,.1992), 29; David W. Daniels, Babylon Religion: How a Babylonian Goddess became the
Virgin Mary
(Ontario, California: Chick Publications, 2006), 29.
[121]  Oliver Farrar Emerson,
Legends of Cain, Especially in Old and Middle English (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: American Sunday-
School Union, 1916), 929.
[122]  
Nimrod: King of the World, 5, http://www.iwc.net/~levi/nimrod.htm (accessed June 2, 2000).
[123]  
Nimrod: King of the World, 4, http://www.iwc.net/~levi/nimrod.htm (accessed June 2, 2000).

What is said of Nimrod?… For he drew power from Bavel (Babylon) that helped him to cling on to the
dominion of the Other Side. It also reads, "they found a plain in the land of Shinar," meaning they filled
their hearts with desire derived from Shinar, to leave the upper dominion and join a different power… the
land of Shinar, which is Bavel, is the head and root of severance from the Holy One, Blessed by He (God).
                                                                                                 - Zohar 4 Noach 42[101]

Nimrod now strived to establish more of a more
centralized earth, not spread out; the location chosen, of
course, was the exact place where this corruption had its symbol
before the flood! Of course, we know
this as none other than
Babylon – “the head and root of severance from the Holy One.”[102]

Apparently, there were at least seven cities of Cain in this area; all which were devastated by the flood.
All of these Nimrod probably wanted to bring "back to life,” to one degree or another.[103] The survivors of
the flood centralized themselves in these lands, and began to rebuild on the same old foundations that
were there before.[104]
Encouraged by his father Cush, Nimrod employed the people to, not only construct the Tower of Babel, but
rebuild the city of Babylon, into an abode where people “could remain forever,” and, where mankind
alone
would “rule the world” (without the power of God to dictate over them).[105] This is the essence of Mystery
Babylon
.

Therefore Nymbrotus (Nimrod)… marked out the city and laid the foundations of a very great tower… and
built up the tower to the height and size of mountains, as a sign and monument to the fact that the
Babylonian people is first in the world and it should be called the kingdom of kingdoms.
                                                                                                            - Annius[106]

The people had become just as self-absorbed as their leader had been. The tower and city of Babylon was,
once again, the “flagship” of their pompous, blasphemous efforts against God!

The Third "Cain"

Nimrod and Cush would stand "on the shoulders” of their antediluvian ancestors. This allowed Nimrod to
become the “3rd incarnation” of the “son” figure of the Garden of Eden –
Cain! Along with Cush (the third
“father” figure of the post-flood world), the people now had their “3rd incarnation” of Cain - the “son.” This
seemed natural for Nimrod, since Cush was his father.

Since Cain established Babylon before the flood, it now became an integral part of
Nimrod’s agenda: to
restore this ancient city to its original pagan splendor.[107] Nimrod was beginning to act like his famous
ancestor in, oh, so many ways:

Nimrod reinhabited the cites of Cain and adopted his language, his religion and his civilization. [They] built
upon the ruins of a civilization that existed in Shinar before the Flood… (and) glorified their ancient cities…
                                                                                         (Tannehill, 1916, p. 86-87)[108]

The Opposite

Next, Cush and Nimrod began to stir up emotional passions of the people; convincing them that it was, now,
all about
themselves; it was all about mankind, and their own self-actualization. They began to convince
the populous to even become
upset with God - that God who Noah preached about - for one important
reason:
He who was the one who always tried to bring them, and their ways, down! He was the one who
was
enslaving them. He was the one who wiped out their glorious, divine ancestors!
These ancestors, as we know, were the same that many post-flood people worshipped - now, in their
new,
post-flood
"incarnations."

Their original fear of God now turned into thoughts of hate, and thoughts of
revenge.

Hate and Revenge

The Tower of Babel was to be used for, yet, another purpose: not just to unite the people, but to enact
revenge on the God who wiped out their ancestors.[109]

The people postulated: if this God ever thought to send down a flood again, they, with this new tower,
would be ready! The tower was now designed to be as tall as a mountain for another reason – to extend
beyond the reach of any water that this “hateful” God could bring![110] Talk about insubordination. Talk
about corrupted “politically correct” ideals of the day - all of which promoted such outright
hatred towards
the Creator of the Universe!

Own Bricks

The rebellious people who worked hand over foot on this tower took their unity against God one step
further – they wanted to make their participation in this tower-building process duly
noted, by having their
own name inserted, somewhere, in the building itself!

And they said everyone to his neighbour: Let us take bricks (lit. stones), and let us, each one, write our
names upon the bricks and burn them with fire: and that which is thoroughly burned shall be for mortar and
brick.
                                                                                 - Pseudo-Philo 6:2[111]

This way, their names could,
forever, be inscribed into these bricks; and into their heart! It was their way
of “cementing” their counter-beliefs against this one, true God. It seemed as though they were putting their
full faith
in the tower,  and all that it seemingly could bring them! They wanted to show the entire world
what they, as a
united people, could do, if they put their devotion to it![112] Again, we see people putting
everything they could towards something that came from
the earth, and nothing which comes from above
(as in God)!

(Cush) in this case, having a nature truly dissolute, does not at all keep fast the spiritual bond of the soul –
but like a giant born of the earth, prefers earthly to heavenly things…
                                                                                         (Cates, 1998, p. 52)[113]

We have, yet, another association of Cush with the
earth: he feels connected with “earthly things,” such as
a tower built out of mud and brick.[114] Isn't
Satan (a.k.a. Sammael, the Serpent, etc.) also considered
“god of this world” (II Cor. 4:14)?

Tales of Determination

Their work towards building this newly-dedicated Tower would, from then on, become a drive of “mad
folly.”[115] There are a few humorous legends regarding the drive of these people. Whether the stories had
a grain of truth to them is questionable, but it seems relevant to include them here, if anything, to show the
ruthless, almost unbelievable, determination these tower-building people would have possessed.

For one, the continual peer-pressure to lay brick after brick became so fanatical that many people may
have paid little regards to their own health and wellness. Each of these bricks placed was considered one
less brick towards achieving their hateful goal against God![116] These bricks, and what they stood for,
obviously became valuable towards their end-result; extremely valuable:

And behold these ascended and others descended the whole day; and if a brick should fall from their
hands and get broken, they would all weep over it, and if a man fell and died, none of them would look at
him.
                                                                                    - Book of Jasher 9:28[117]

Another tradition tells us that: if a woman was
pregnant while laying these bricks, she was barely granted
any leave - even if she had to deliver a baby! If she was in labor, she was moved aside, coaxed into giving
birth, and then expected to go right back into her role of laying brick![118]

Even to 'Kill' God Himself!

Tradition also tells us the people may have branched out into three groups, based on their individual intent:

They split up into three parties.
- One said, 'Let us ascend and dwell there'…
- the second, 'Let us ascend and serve idols'…
- and the third said, 'Let us ascend and wage war [with God].'
                      - Babylonian Talmud Sanhedrin 109a[119]

Their animosity towards God was so filled with hate that some people wanted to reach up to the area
where God was, and overthrow Him! Others wanted, not only to place their own idols up there, but place a
sword up on top - to symbolize their own vengeance. And still others felt the desire to fight this oppressive
God, one on one.[120]

It got worse:

                                   Nimrod (wanted)… to get into heaven and destroy God himself.
                                                                                       (Emerson, 1916, p. 929)[121]

Yes, they even wanted to “kill” God. The more they worked towards finishing the Tower, the more obsessed
they became.[122] With a corrupted leader like Nimrod at the helm, the atmosphere exploded into a
downward spiral of moral decay and decadence.

It boggles the mind how flagrant these people were! One question that may come to mind might be: how
could the ancients become so arrogant towards God in such as short period of time? It’s was only about
100 or so years since the flood destroyed the world they once knew! Such is the power of the human mind.

We see that:

Nimrod… is definitely the first in the world of the pattern of the Anti-Christ and of the New World Order… he
was supreme authority in all matters of spiritual and religious understanding, as well as maintaining his
empire. He was going to rule the world; also going against the spoken Word of God, spoken by Noah…
                                                                   ("Nimrod: King of the World", n. d., p. 4)[123]

These “new” political and religious ideologies were nothing but the “old” politics and religious ideologies of
Cain and the
Serpent – revived in the post-flood world. So intense were the mind-sets of these people, the
Bible gives us a very frightening perception about what was happening during this era:

And the LORD said, Behold, the people is one, and they have all one language; and this they begin to do:
and now nothing will be restrained from them, which they have imagined to do.
                                                                                              - Gen. 11:6 (KJV)

The people - utilizing the
mysteries or knowledge of the pre-flood Nephilim - could have become so
powerful that there was nothing - almost
nothing - on this earth that could have stopped them!

…a scary thought, indeed.

We recall this
knowledge was the same knowledge of the pre-flood Nephilim, and the same knowledge that
helped form an integral part of the
Mystery side of Mystery Babylon! Here, it comes into play, again!

God already promised the people of the post-flood world that He wouldn’t destroy the earth again with a
flood. He already blessed them, and hoped their new society would work out for the better (under Noah,
Shem, and Nimrod: His new viceroys). But, as we’ve seen, the people under Cush, and now
Nimrod, again
went in the opposite direction: hating God; dead-set on finishing the Tower, and achieving their vengeance
against God, and all of those they perceived who had “wronged” them.

What was God to do?

A symbol of this new rebellion was about to be constructed. Most of those who know of the Bible have
probably heard of the “Tower of Babel.” The concept of building something as mighty as a
tower might
have been on Nimrod’s mind even while on the side of God! This brainchild of Nimrod may, at least in the
beginning, have had a noble undertaking:

If others were impacted by the flood and now were in fear of God, Nimrod can show that he too is God-
fearing. If we take this logic one step further, we can posit that his original stated intention of the Tower was
to build a shrine for the service of God.
                      ("Nimrod: Man, Maniac or Myth", n. d., p. 13)[93]

                           Nimrod said to people “Let us build four pillars on all four corners of the
                                                               earth to support the heavens!”
                                                                                        (Glenn, 1929, p. 30)[94]

To either show glory to God, or even “help” God in His “support" of the heavens, the erection of a huge
tower was to be undertaken. As Nimrod became more and more corrupt, however, and became the sole
object people’s desire, “the original pretext was forgotten, and the rebellious work had begun.”[95]

Instead of honoring God, the whole purpose of the Tower now became misdirected. It, now, was to be
Nimrod’s mountain – his own throne; his sanctuary.[96] God, as we know, had certain mountains as His
“high places” in the past; Nimrod wanted the same. Nimrod began looking for somewhere that he, like God,
could dwell – way up in the
sky (or, the heavens). He wanted to begin his rule from there.

The tower was also going to have a temple built atop of it – devoted to Nimrod, his religion, and whatever
“gods” he deemed worth of devotion.

Any ancient tradition which stated the people built this tower to "reach up to the heavens” might not only be
referring to its
height, but also towards the reaching some sort of heavenly understanding. These people
wanted to reach - and possess - a spiritual level of authority over our natural world.

The “ways” of Cain and the Serpent were coming back – in full-force. The changes to the original purpose
of the Tower were now in place. All of this began to bring detrimental effects to the people around it:

                                           The atmosphere of the tower causes forgetfulness.
                                                                                 - The Babylonian Talmud Sanhedrin 109a[97]

And as a result of this there arose forgetfulness, error, sinful undisciplined passions, and evil promiscuity
among humankind within the world. And thus the world turned back again to its original state of
disorderliness and became filled with evils as it had been in the beginning before the flood.
                                                                                 (Layton, 1995, p. 189)[98]

Also, To Rebuild a Famous City

Instead of making sure the people followed God, and move to their appointed lands, the opposite was
about to occur. Nimrod took this once-noble effort of father Noah and turned it all “on its ear.” Instead of
encouraging people to settle in areas God commanded that they go, Nimrod began to “bring them all
together.”[99] Nimrod also had plans to travel abroad; to go to lands Noah already established, and bring
them back under his "umbrella" of influence - he was about to establish a political empire, all under
him.[100]

Beyond these altered plans for the tower, and before any empire he could establish, there were thoughts
of rebuilding a very famous
city, as well - a city that existed well before the flood. The original inhabitants of
this city once celebrated the “ways” of Cain - in monumental ways. There was a reason Cain, and people
like him,
cleaved to this city, and what it all symbolized:

According to the system which Nimrod was the grand instrument in introducing, men were led to believe
that a real spiritual change of heart was unnecessary, and that so far as change was needful, they could be
regenerated by mere external means.
                                  ("Nimrod - Babylonian - Musical Worship Teams", n. d., p. 21)[88]

      …(the people)… becoming deserters so as to fly to the lifeless and immovable nature of the flesh…
                                (and) Nimrod being the first to set the example of this desertion…
                                                               - Works of Philo Judaeus On the Giants 15(65)[89]

Thanks to Cush - and,
now, Nimrod - the populous was beginning to go after the flesh again, just as they
did before the flood. They were beginning to look to
the earth for their pathway to "redemption" or
“salvation.” Instead of Nimrod acting as a mighty hunter
in front of, or before, the Lord, he now became a
hunter
against, or in opposition to, the Lord![90] Nimrod was, now, walking full-blown down the pathway
of Cush’s darkened ideologies:

…he (Nimrod) was a giant against God… (and) unmitigated wickedness has no participation in light, but
imitates night and darkness: and the practice of the huntsman is as much as possible at variance with
rational nature, for he who lives among wild beasts wishes to live the life of a beast, and to be equal to the
brutes in the vices of wickedness…
                                          - Works of Philo Judaeus Questions and Answers on Genesis 2(82)[91]

He was even beginning to act in savage, “
beast-like,” ways! Nimrod became a rebel in God’s eyes, and a
giant in everyone else's![92]

New Meanings for the 'Tower'

Nimrod became well-known for his ability to hunt, and kill, large animals. Also, when people saw these
animals crouch down in front of him, many began to attribute this as the power Nimrod
alone, and not the
God who put the power into these clothes![54] It, quite often, began to seem that:

              ...none knew the source of his strength, and all ascribed it to his own mighty personality.
                                                                                  (Glenn, 1929, p. 30)[55]

These garments must have been really incredible to see in action; many were still confused on how they
worked.[56] Nimrod, seemingly, was doing everything right. People were flocking to him, because of what
he could give: contained within the strength of Adam’s supernatural apparel, Nimrod had all of the wild
beasts around their area kept "in check."[57] The people finally found someone who, they perceived, was
on
their side; one who protected them from the many unfortunate by-products of their world; one who was
able to give them a sense of peace and security.[58]

Once, a 'Warrior for God'

God, then, assigned Nimrod and his garment a larger task:

                                     He was the first who carried on war against his neighbours.
                                                                                       (Hislop, 1916, p. 23)[59]

Yes, there was strife brewing, already, amongst the descendants of Noah. The offspring of Noah’s three
sons began to get on each other’s nerves; probably because they lived so close to each other. God gave
Nimrod a new role: to use his power to “clean up” problems in the
human animal, as well.

The First 'Mighty One'

Book of Jasher
7:
31 And Nimrod strengthened himself, and he rose up from amongst his brethren, and he fought the battles
    of his brethren against all their enemies round about.
32 And the Lord delivered all the enemies of his brethren in his hands, and God prospered him from time to
    time in his battles, and he reigned upon earth.[60]

Around this same time, war began to break out between the different groups of Noah’s descendants.[61]
Apparently, the Japhethites (the sons of Japheth) were being confrontational to other people of the area.
God gave Nimrod, his Hamitic brethren, as well as some of the Semites (the sons of Shem) the power to
contain their unruliness. Its interesting to see, here, that God took the side of
Nimrod and his brethren –
the
Hamites; and not other descendants of Noah (i.e. the Japhethites)! We see, again, that God clearly
acted merciful and just, no matter
where these people were from! He didn’t forget about the descendants
of
Ham, even though their patriarch surely forgot about his loyalty to God!

Book of Jasher 7:
34 … there was a war between his brethren and the children of Japheth, so that they (Nimrod and his clan)
    were in the power of their enemies.
35 And Nimrod went forth at that time, and he assembled all the sons of Cush and their families… and he
    hired also from some of his friends and acquaintances… and he went with them to battle, and when
    he was on the road, Nimrod strengthened the hearts of the people that went with him.
36 And he said to them, Do not fear, neither be alarmed, for all our enemies will be delivered into our
    hands, and you may do with them as you please.
37 … and they destroyed them, and subdued them…[62]

Nimrod, once a mighty “hunter” of animals, now became victorious in the
human arena, as well; “hunting”
all of those opposed to God’s will, and winning all of these “battles of the Lord.”[63]

The "Shaking" of His Enemies

Now that he was getting the people of the area under control, Nimrod decided to build – or rebuild – the
infrastructure of the land. We've already mentioned the area where Babylon was once located was
known as
Shinar; which equated to the word “shaking.” This “shaking” possibly stood in remembrance of
the uncontrolled
shaking that Cain once had (as a punishment for disobeying God's will). Now, it seemed
that Shinar, and the “shaking” associated with it, took on a whole new meaning:

Book of Jasher 7:
42 And whilst he was reigning according to his heart's desire, after having conquered all his enemies
    around, he advised with his counselors to build a city for his palace, and they did so.
43 And they found a large valley opposite to the east, and they built him a large and extensive city, and
    Nimrod called the name of the city that he built Shinar, for the Lord had vehemently shaken his
    enemies and destroyed them.
44 And Nimrod dwelt in Shinar, and he reigned securely, and he fought with his enemies and he
    subdued them, and he prospered in all his battles, and his kingdom became very great.[64]

Making the People Separate

As previously stated, it was approximately 100 years after the flood; and Noah (under God’s command)
was arranging the people to spread out, and occupy their own areas.[65] They were to expand to the
continents of Africa, Asia, and Europe. God wanted them to settle in their own lands to, more or less,
stop any bickering or wars that might take place (the result of living so close, one to another).

Many people, however, may not have desired to follow this decree; so it would be
Nimrod who, often,
would have to force them to go and stay within their appointed lands.[66] Noah was working on one end of
the spectrum (by trying to establish these settlements); and Nimrod was working on the other (by making
sure the people stayed within their appointed realms). Because of this, Nimrod became known as the great
"civilizer" of mankind. By following God’s direction, it seems he raised the standards of living for all of those
under their influence.[67] But, how long could this last?

Nimrod tried to continue where Noah left off,
philosophically. He worked to make sure the people
understood what God’s ways of life and truth were. Because of this, Nimrod was also considered the
“messenger of light or truth,” because he continued the teaching of the one, true, invisible God.[68] As the
moon shone in the midnight sky, Nimrod was said to have “reflected the light” of God’s reasoning.[69]

Then, It All "Went to His Head"

And when Nimrod had joyfully returned from battle, after having conquered his enemies, all his brethren,
together with those who knew him before, assembled to make him king over them, and they placed the
regal crown upon his head.
                                                                       - Book of Jasher 7:39[70]

Nimrod seemed to be doing everything right! The people under him soon began to think of Nimrod as their
king.[71] Like any young man, this could really do a lot to raise his feelings of self-esteem. Nimrod could
easily have been tempted to feel “full of himself,” or allow his inflated thoughts of
ego to overshadow his
purpose and judgment.[72] Assuredly, Cush must have been whispering in his ear a lot, as well; or,
outright, trying to convince him to follow
other ways.
Eventually, Nimrod became so “proud and self-opinionated” that he, ultimately, began to hint that
he and
his clothes alone were the origin of all of his mightiness. It seemed that God was given less and less credit
for Nimrod's mighty deeds.

More Passed on to Nimrod

To elevate his esteem even more, Nimrod began to learn some other knowledge – this same occult
knowledge his father taught him:

…the arts of divination began with Cham (Ham), the son of Noah, who was both of most subtle genius and
trained in the schools of demons… Nemroth (Nimrod) revived the art of astronomy… and, was... deemed a
god by many because of his great lore.
                            ("Looking for Jonitus", n. d., p. 14)[73]

It was around this time - “elated by so much glory” - that Nimrod’s behavior may have changed,
for the
worse
; and his mind became a lot darker.[74]

Into the Darkness - Again!

Most people of the day were well-aware of the flood; a good number could still see results of it, to their day.
A lot of the populous respected God a great deal because of it, and was prone to follow Noah’s teaching
without question – that is, until
now. Times were beginning to change. Nimrod, his pride now coming to the
forefront, and his father bringing up the rear, began to push
other ideas onto the people. They say that
absolute power corrupts -
absolutely:

Before Nimrod, people walked in fear of God… everyone walked with great… fear of sinning… Nimrod’s
ambition… soon became to free the people from their fear of God.
                                                                          ("Nimrod: King of the World", n. d., p. 4)[75]

God was, at first, able to put "the fear of God” into the people; but not that much, anymore. Nimrod had
forgotten about the “golden goose” that elevated him into such a position. He, like a number of those before
him, also had a
dark side. The grand manipulation of the post-Flood populous was about to begin.

Nimrod, first, desired to free himself of anything he felt was God’s "rule!”[76] Creation, again, began to
rebel against the Creator. With Cush’s help, Nimrod was willing to go and show the populous, “how they
might enjoy the pleasures of sin, without any fear of the wrath of a holy God.”[77] This seemed to be how
the manipulation of the public began, on a large scale; and how Nimrod ended up so “black in heart.” Let's
see how it all became so twisted.

Invisible God... To Visible Idol

At first, as we know, Nimrod tried to help the people to establish a personal relationship with God. People
could see the results of God’s wrath, but could not see
Him, per se. This became confusing to a good
number of them. Many of the generation before the flood understood the use of
idols in religious practice,
and what their purpose was.

The… people taught by Nimrod, however, could not grasp the abstract concept of an invisible God… they
were accustomed to worshiping gods of wood and stone, which represented the material things in their
lives.
                                        ("Babylonian Paganism Becomes Trinitarian Christianity", n. d., p. 1)[78]

It seemed hard for those of the post-flood world to shake a religious tradition that was, at one time, very
commonplace. After the flood, God wanted the people to worship
Him and Him alone; as well as trust in the
men He set aside for them, like Noah and Nimrod. He did not want the people to look to anything
of the
earth
for their salvation, like idols.

In an attempt to emphasize that God was really out there, and an intangible essence, Nimrod tried to explain
to the populous that God was, just plainly, out of their reach. He labeled the
sky and heavens as the abodes
where God dwelt; and the people just had to use
faith, and accept that He was there.[79] Many still had a
hard time accepting this. They were just “too deep” into recalling the “ways” of the pre-flood world into
their post-flood hearts. So, in compromise:

                     The people subsequently erected statues to depict Nimrod’s godly attributes so
                                                             that they could touch these images…
                                       ("Babylonian Paganism Becomes Trinitarian Christianity", n. d., p. 1)[80]

Nimrod might have tried, next, to appease these unsavory thoughts of the people; and allowed them to set
up images on their own. Eventually, these images took “center stage,” and the concept of a truly invisible
God began to be forgotten. Eventually,

                                               People of the flood began to say God did not exist.
                                                                                                 - Book of Jasher 6:19[81]

Which "God"?

                       …in the kingdom of Nimrod, each worshiped of his own make… each after
                                                            the imagination of his own heart.
                                                                                        - Writings of Abraham 23:3[82]

This was Nimrod’s opportunity to allow his
pride to take advantage of the situation. The ancient Rabbi
Rashi, for example, stated that Nimrod began to use occasions such as this to manipulate, or ensnare
people into modem of false worship. This manipulation was made successful by the use of Adam’s clothing,
as well as by his
darkened words:

Nimrod used to entice people into idolatrous worship by means of those garments, which enabled him to
conquer the world and proclaim himself its ruler, so that mankind offered him worship.
                                                                     ("Nimrod: Man, Maniac or Myth", n. d., p. 13)[83]

Ultimately, people began to look to these images as representations of
other gods; even as Nimrod himself.
Ancestor worship, as we see, began to, again, be on the rise. The people believed that, since they could not
see God, but could
see Nimrod, and what he was doing, it only made sense to them that Nimrod should be
the one who was considered “god-like.”

                             Throughout the known world, people worshiped images of Nimrod rather
                                                                   than the one true invisible God.
                                       ("Babylonian Paganism Becomes Trinitarian Christianity", n. d., p. 1)[84]

Nimrod, of course, began to agree with the populous, and accept
his role as a “god” they could worship![85]
First, then, he began to allow other gods, such as him, into their religious spectrum. Second, he decided to
stamp out the existence of anyone or anything who might be a competitor - a.k.a. the God of Noah. Pride
will, indeed, do this to people!
These self-centered, humanistic ways of looking at our world took hold of his soul.
Self-worship and self-
adoration were on the rise:

                       For in our world we have no God; but we all are gods; we all are of the light,
                                                        heavenly, powerful, strong and glorious…
                                                                        - Second Book of Adam and Eve 5:11[86]

Nimrod’s “new” views of politics and religion were nothing “new” at all (as we know); only a revival of these
old "ways" of thinking.

Desertion = Babylon

…as translated in the Bible it only says "He was a mighty hunter before the Lord"… and the name Nimrod,
being interpreted, means, desertion… Moses calls the seat of Nimrod's kingdom Babylon, and the
interpretation of the word Babylon is "change;" a thing nearly akin to desertion, the name, too, being akin to
the name, and the one action to the other; for the first step of every deserter is a change and alteration of
mind…
                                                   - Works of Philo Judaeus On the Giants 15(66)[87]

Some very powerful words from Philo, indeed! The “hope and change” that many people felt became
heavily dependent on what Nimrod said or did – and he welcomed it! In order for this “change” to occur,
there, first, has to be a
desertion in the minds of the people – a desertion of past ideals! There, as well,
need to be something, or
someone, for people to desert – and we know Who that was!

This desertion of God always seems to stem from one’s mind, and spews out (in all directions), into
changes of one’s cultural, political, and religious ideologies!

On top of it, the
focus of one’s worship is not static - it seems to have the need to be directed somewhere,
or in
some direction! That's why the sin of wrong use is so often mentioned in the Bible! Things of our
world might not be wrong to admire, or to enjoy; but when it becomes
higher than God in one's mind, then
it becomes a problem. The people of old wanted to worship in their
own ways, and direct their worship
towards whomever or whatever they pleased - and Nimrod was
right there, to support these ideologies!

It was approximately one hundred and twenty years after the flood; sometime in the neighborhood of 2254
B.C. This next Biblical patriarch was one of the most influential people of his time; but his story wasn't very
well known to people, since. Its obscurity still remains unto this day. Why? The answer is fairly simple:
understanding just
who he was, and what he did to the post-flood world, tends to expose more of Mystery
Babylon
. So, let’s go...

Many of us might still have the opposite perception of this Biblical character. When one thinks of a
Nimrod,
they might picture an “awkward dunce,” an “ogre,” or an “oaf.” The reason we have been conditioned to
think in these ways is because those responsible for ancient Jewish tradition might have tried to humiliate
this character; to make him look
silly or foolish.[45] It’s totally understandable; character-attacks like this
are widely practiced today.
Nimrod, in reality, wasn’t an “oaf” at all – quite the contrary. He was a very strong and intimidating military
figure. He was a powerful leader in his own right; one who commanded respect - even fear - from a good
number of people in his day. This individual would, also, eventually start to walk down a familiar pathway -
away from the true God of Noah and his son Shem.

Strangely enough, Nimrod did not start out this way, as we shall see. Contemporary peer pressure, his
position in society, and any
pride which may have been latent within him, seemed to have gotten the better
of him.

And Cush the son of Ham, the son of Noah, took a wife in those days in his old age, and she bare a son,
and they called his name Nimrod, saying, At that time the sons of men again began to rebel and
transgress against God…
                                                                   - Book of Jasher 7:23[46]

Something was already “in the air,” thanks to Ham and Cush. Things were beginning to change. Cush was
bringing these pre-flood “ways” back out into the open - with full force. He just needed to be someone with
enough charisma to
launch it, permanently. Cush had the knowledge, he had the authority; but he didn’t
have much of a connection with the people.

Nimrod was thought of as the “special favorite” of his father. Cush “loved him exceedingly, because he was
the son of his old age.”[47] Nimrod, eventually, would be thought of as so close to Cush, in some respects,
that Cush would be considered the “
old” Cush, and Nimrod, the “young” (“new”) Cush. Cush definitely had
plans for this son – if only he could convince him to follow his ways!

Nimrod grew up with a lot of strength and fortitude, and was really in a position to make a difference.
Interestingly enough, it was in his youth that
God called Nimrod into service; and Nimrod answered the
call! Yes,
God also had great plans for young Nimrod; fashioning him to be one of His viceroys, like Noah
and Shem! Nimrod began his career by following God, and passing on the ways of his great-grandfather
Noah to everyone around him.

Nimrod was in a very unique position, indeed; and the proverbial “tug of war” was about to begin – for
Nimrod’s
soul.

There is an interesting element of Nimrod's early life, and his accentuated power, which need mentioning,
here – an important element which traces itself all the way back to Adam himself!

Wearing the 'Clothes of Adam'

Book of Jasher
7:
24 And the garments of skin which God made for Adam and his wife, when they went out of the garden,
    were given to Cush.
25 For after the death of Adam and his wife, the garments were given to Enoch, the son of Jared, and when
    Enoch was taken up to God, he gave them to Methuselah, his son.
26 And at the death of Methuselah, Noah took them and brought them to the ark, and they were with him
    until he went out of the ark.
27 And in their going out, Ham stole those garments from Noah his father, and he took them and hid them
    from his brothers.
28 And when Ham begat his first born Cush, he gave him the garments in secret, and they were with Cush
    many days.
29 And Cush also concealed them from his sons and brothers, and when Cush had begotten Nimrod, he
    gave him those garments through his love for him, and Nimrod grew up, and when he was twenty years
    old he put on those garments.[48]

The garments of Adam were said to have a special (and, obviously, supernatural) quality to them: when
Adam wore them, the animals of his day (and, probably, other humans, as well) felt compelled to
stoop, or
bow down to him! Adam could have used these clothes to tame the animals around the Garden which may
have gotten “out of hand.” These clothes seemed to work even after Adam passed them on to his
descendants – and even after the flood.

They probably had another important significance – whomever possessed these clothes could easily
attest to some manner of “divine authority.” It was believed that Noah may have even worn these clothes
up to the time he fell asleep; drunken, outside his tent.
Ham could have used this opportunity to demean Noah even further, by stealing them!

Eventually, as we’ve already seen, Nimrod would end up in possession of them. Tradition tells us that
Nimrod was around the age of 20 when Cush gave him these garments.[49] The battle for Nimrod's soul
was intensifying. Cush wanted him to follow his "ways," obviously, by giving him these garments; but the
clothes, traditionally, were
only used by those who in the service of God…

One way or another, Nimrod was on the pathway to stardom.

Using the Clothes 'For Good'

                    When Nimrod wore the skins of Adam his outward appears was that of Adam…
                                          creatures (were) humbled… thinking he was their king.
                                                                             (Schwartz, 2004, p. 437)[50]

This might have all worked out in God’s favor, at least
at first. God could have allowed Nimrod to, in some
way, end up with these clothes, so he could use them for His own will and purpose. Nimrod, after all, wasn’t
wicked in his youth.[51] For a good number of years, Nimrod was a man of virtue – one who wanted to
take on whatever God’s laid out before him.[52]

And Nimrod became strong when put on the garments, and God gave him might and strength, and he was a
mighty hunter in the earth… and he hunted the animals and he built altars, and he offered upon them the
animals before the Lord.
                                                                   - Book of Jasher 7:30[53]

   …that’s exactly what… Cush wants to do. He flees with his son… Nimrod, from the authority of Ham –
                      from the authority of the line of Seth – and he’s headed strait for Babylon…
                                                                                 (Johnson, 2004, p. 114)[22]

The Third 'Adam'

Because he brought back the “splendor” of these early “ways,” Cush would be deified for this "brave"
stunt, as well! We recall that Noah was considered, by many in the post-flood era, the “2nd incarnation” of
Adam; Naamah, the “2nd incarnation” of Eve; and Ham, the “2nd incarnation” of Cain. Here, the cycle
repeats, one more time!

We begin with the “3rd incarnation” of the “father” god in the Garden of Eden – a "3rd incarnation" of
Adam/the Serpent. This, of course, begins with Cush - the new
father! It seems that "3 times a charm," in
regards to pagan ideology, here!
One of the major ancient Greek gods -
Hermes - was, for example, a god that seemingly equated to
Cush.[23] The name, itself, actually seems to be a compounded world: the “
Her” and “mes” equates to
"
Ham" and "the son of," respectively; hence, "the son of Ham." Who was this famous “Son of Ham?” Cush,
of course!

Interestingly enough, Cush (a.k.a.
Hermes), was also thought of as Hermes Trismagistus - the “Thrice
Great” or “Three Times Great” Hermes![24] Again, as far as pagan theology is concerned, this title -
“thrice great” - could signify a particular deity as the
utmost, or highest, deity. In a way, he was: Cush was
one of the most influential “gods” of his day. But, Cush was also elevated into this
father position for the
third time
, which could also relate to his being thought of as "thrice great!"
The circular “resurgence” of ancient gods and goddesses in the Garden forms the essence of ancient
pagan ancestor worship. Their ancestors never seemed to die – they just keep being “reincarnated” into
the most powerful people of their day.

Now, it’s Cush’s turn!

We will soon see there would be a
third triad of “Eve” and “Cain,” as well; "reincarnating" into certain other
famous mortals of the day!

Time To Tell Noah "Who's Boss"

Greek mythology also made it known that, in no uncertain terms, Cush (i.e. Hermes) would eventually let
Noah know (and all those who followed him) that their ways were no longer "politically correct." Cush, and
the “ways” he was establishing, were taking over![25]

The Greeks also made it known that Noah never really resists this challenge.[26] He remained at least
somewhat passive throughout much of this religious transformation.[27] Noah was, as we know, attempting
to settle new areas, and give people a new life.[28] He was probably getting a little
old for any conflict or
confrontation.

This
new movement, under Cush’s authority, was now beginning to take up speed. Seeing that the moral
authority of Noah could be toppled amongst some of the colonies he established, Ham may have begun to
feel more and more leery about all that was going on, and Cush more emboldened.
Greek mythology stated that Ham (as the god
Chiron) “ultimately regretted abetting the development” of
Cush’s new “ways” of culture, religion, and politics.[29]
When still other members of Ham's family began to join Cush's cause, Ham, interestingly enough, began to
feel “in such continuous pain” that "he no longer wished to be immortal…”[30] In other words, Ham, unlike
Cush, retained at least somewhat of a
conscience about what he did. Sometimes, it got so bad in his mind
that he really didn't care whether he lived, or died.[31]

…and we
know what would happen to him, before his time!

Cain's "Ways" Reborn

Regardless of any regrets, Ham still allowed things to happen which augmented these negative trends.
Apparently, in an
unapologetic act, Ham transferred a lot of his angelic knowledge to Cush, himself![32]
Cush took this knowledge and made him the new
priest (or prophet) of their time.[33]

                           (Hermes)… is a deification of Cush, the original postdiluvian prophet (of
                                                            the serpent’s wisdom from Babylon).
                                                                                            (Johnson, 2002, p. 46)[34]

But, one might ask: how could Cush become so popular, so
quickly? This knowledge would allow mankind
to access
power - the power for people to take control of their own destiny (at least in their minds)! The
ancients were beginning to look to something else to "save" their souls, and not God. Cush, not only
reestablished these “ways” of Cain and the Serpent, again, but the same “man-centered” society as was
before the flood, as well.[35]

             The way of Greek religion… is nothing less than the way of Kain (Cain)… and the “way
                         of Cain”… is a life lived without God’s interference with mankind’s desires.
                                                                                             (Johnson, 2004, p. 16)[36]

This fits modern-day
Humanism to a tee: man or mankind as the important element on this earth; no religion
is necessary; nothing spiritual, no need to utilize faith in any so-called "Creator."[37]

Humanism - the "Re-Beginnings"

Humanism - the denial of any power or moral value superior to that of humanity; the rejection of religion in
                   favour of a belief in the advancement of humanity by its own efforts
                                                                                        ("Humanism", n. d., p. 1)[38]

Those who follow this movement, today, might claim that Humanism is not a religion, per se; but it
does
seem to parallel the “ways” of Cain. It also may not involve the worship of a god, but there is worship –
self-worship. It could be considered a “religion,” in a way – a secular religion.

We could easily conclude human
pride as a large part of this humanistic movement – an emotion of which
the
Serpent always promoted. Man, with his own pride, could find a means to his own ends.[39] We hear a
lot of this kind of talk
today; we now confirm it has very ancient roots:

                                             Babylon… the post-diluvian type of the city of men…
                                                                                             (Bandy, 1967, p. 161)[40]

Because this concept also seemed to have its roots with Cain and the Serpent, Cush would go on to
include
this in his post-flood dogma. But, as we already know, one who tries to do things on their own will
fall short eventually, because
they, and this world, are not perfect.

Cush was discussed by the ancient historian Philo:

…Chus was the elder son of evil… (as one) being the dissolved and loose nature of the earth… for the
earth, when dense and fertile, and moist, is full of herbs, and hills, and trees, and is well arranged for the
production of different fruits; but when dissolved and reduced to dust and dry, it is unfruitful and barren…
                              - Works of Philo Judaeus Questions and Answers on Genesis 2(81)[41]

Following this allegory: when one tries to be spiritually “fruitful” on their own it usually won’t be there for
long; it may even have detrimental effects to the practitioner:

                           …this is… the cause of barrenness to the soul and to all its parts.
                               - Works of Philo Judaeus Questions and Answers on Genesis 2(81)[42]

Any short-term benefits gained by following the “ways” of Cain will, eventually, be reduced to “dust” (in a
manner of speaking). Not only would following the ways of the earth (or world) point an individual towards
unfruitfulness over time, but also will open up one one's soul (or mind) to become
blackened! The same
happened to Cain, to Ham, and also to Canaan.[43]

Cush’s dominion of the post-flood world didn't seem to be complete without the help of his
son, however.
Cush was more of a “mastermind,” or “brains,” behind this operation. His son would soon go on to be the
“brawn” behind its implementation. So, in order to proceed further, lets travel a little bit into the past, and
look at the de-evolution of Cush’s son; and how he headed into his own
darkness of soul.[44]

Nimrod

                                                     “Nimrod… the greatest story never told.”
                                                                                                  - The Author

Cush, also, came down from this same mountain.
He was, as well, accredited for doing something extremely
monumental in the post-flood world: since the
“ways" of Cain, or Cain’s bloodline, were
crushed, or pounded down into the earth, Cush was accredited
as the one who brought it all
back![15] Into the earth these “ways” were pounded, and out of this same
earth would they return! Hence, this was another reason Cush was associated with the earth. There is
another possible reason he had this association, as we shall see.

These “ways” would resurface,
indeed - with a vengeance![16]

Departing from Noah's Ways

God assigned Noah to become the “father” figure over everyone who lived after the flood. His career,
now, would involve taking groups of his descendants, and other people aboard the ark, and establish them
homelands - individual nations for each group - as God had directed him.
It was a very monumental task, indeed; a task which involved a lot of traveling. But, Noah was only one
man, however. It wasn't very easy for him to monitor every settlement he helped to establish. He was able
to bring them to a new land, give them a few pointers to follow, and had to move on, to another location.
There wasn’t a lot of time to “drive home” all the moral thought God had supplied him with.

As a result, the sanctity of the known world wasn't as
concrete as Noah was hoping. The possibility arose
for many of these fledgling civilizations to loosen from under Noah’s authority - if an opportunity ever arose.
And arise it
did, for many, because of people such as Cush and Ham.

Certain ancient Greek artwork pictured Cush (and his son) “fleeing” from the authority of Noah; even from
Ham. This was, of course, the symbol of Cush, and how he ran from Noah, and brought back the older
"ways" of the pre-flood world.[17]

Why would Cush flee from
Ham, as well, if Ham often went down these same moral pathways?

Ham Only 'Gave a Hand'

We already mentioned how Ham was the first to bring knowledge of these antediluvian Nephilim back into
the post-flood world. Strangely enough, he didn't seem to be as
outspoken about the ramifications of his
actions as Cush. It's easy to assume that, even though Ham went down this wrong moral pathway a
number of times, he
still grew up under Noah’s teachings. His upbringing probably stood in the way of any
desire to see these "ways" corrupt the whole world.[18] Ham, for the most part, seemed to embrace this
knowledge for his
own selfish reasons, or to advance his own personal agendas.

                      (Ham)… wanted his father’s authority for himself as a member of the line of
                                           Seth, and not to establish a contrary belief system.
                                                                          (Johnson, 2004, p. 114)[19]

According to the ancient Greeks, Ham served only as a transitional figure: giving "a
hand” to its develop-
ment.[20] Greek mythology seemed to have equated Ham with the god
Chiron - the god with an open, out
stretched
hand. Ham stretched out his hand in support of change (but that’s all).

       Ham functioned as an enabler for the development of religion but did not fully embrace it himself.
                                                                           (Johnson, 2002, p. 26)[21]

It does seem that the way one was nurtured might have something to do with how they turn out, later in life!
Ham was also starting to feel a little remorse about what he had done to the world. It’s similar to a person
who desired to see what was inside of Pandora’s Box, and then feels remorse that the box unleashed more
into the world than he ever anticipated.

This mindset was not the same for Cush, however. He seemed destined to use this knowledge to
its full-
est potential
:

Some of the most detailed, and perhaps best, contributions towards understanding the times just after the
flood came from the ancient Greeks. The way these Greeks recorded their history (or
mythologies), as well
as how they decorated their pottery and other artwork, helped provide a number of intimate details on just
what might have occurred after Noah came down from the ark.

To understand how this all helps to build upon our expose’ of
Mystery Babylon, we must take into account
that the ancient Greeks were, for the most part,
pagan in ideology. Most of their interpretations would have
taken sides with the “ways” of Cain, one way or another. Hence, most of the information they provided to
us would be skewed - certainly not pointing positively towards the God of Noah, or what Noah and his son
Shem would preach:

     The Greek mythologies don’t say anything about Shem because he… never got involved with their
                              paganism… The Greek mythologies mention Ham and Japheth…
                                                                                           (Gascoigne, 2002, p. 64)[2]

The ancient Greeks, as we see, would rather put anyone who
didn't follow Noah in a more positive light.
They, also, seemed to heave the blame of this terrible flood on the pre-flood Sethites (i.e. the descendants
of
Seth), rather than those who actually sinned![3] As we recall, the Sethites were a group of individuals
who, for the most part, were of the direct seed of Adam himself, or who tried to follow the ways of God; or
both.
A good number of Hamites (the sons of Ham) and Japhethites (the sons of Japheth) would, early on, fall
into accepting much of this pagan ideology. That’s why they were mentioned a lot more, in these ancient
accounts. Who can blame them? Look at how one of the patriarchs -
Ham - was acting.

The people who followed the ways of God - led by Noah and Shem - were considered, quite often, by the
Greeks, as “brutal” or “uncivilized;” and those who followed the “ways” of Cain were considered “noble;”
even “victimized!”[4]
We can actually trace
opposing interpretations such as these all the way back to the Garden of Eden!
When Adam and Eve ate the forbidden fruit, for example, people such as the ancient Greeks wouldn't
necessarily interpret their act as
wrong, or sinful. It, in actuality, may have been thought of as a triumphant
act! Their “brave” decision to gain this knowledge brought Adam and Eve into the “enlightenment” of the
Serpent. It also gave the human race the power to escape the “slavery” they were “subjected” to by the
God of Noah. To the Greeks, the Serpent, through all of this
knowledge, “freed” mankind from the bondage
of an oppressive God; and he (the
Serpent) would be considered the real "illuminator" of all who chose to
follow him, and his "ways."[5] Its incredible how these opposing viewpoints could be twisted around so
much that, eventually, over time, they begin to sound somewhat legitimate to the unwary mind!

Let’s look at some of this ancient information given to us. By piecing it together, we can fill in even more
gaps in the deciphering of
Mystery Babylon. Let’s go.

The Curse Is Over

As we begin, we need to realize, first off, the early Greeks probably had a half-way decent understanding of
the Genesis 3:15 Prophecy!

                   And I will put enmity between thee and the woman, and between thy seed and her
                                      seed; it shall bruise thy head, and thou shalt bruise his heel.
                                                                                                            - Gen. 3:15 (KJV)

They may have realized that, early on, their theological positions – even their bloodlines – were on the
“side” of Eve and the Serpent! They may, or may not, have even been endowed with the blood of
Cain in
their bloodlines; it surely was possible. Regardless, they surely leaned towards the adopting of Cain's
“ways” as their own! Because of this prophecy, they may have also understood that whoever was of this
bloodline, or whoever followed the "ways" of Cain," were destined to have their head “bruised” (in a way).
The ancient Greeks knew the seed-line of Adam and Eve would triumph over Cain for a time; and, at least
as far as this prophecy was concerned! So, they interpreted
the flood as the fulfilment of the Genesis 3:15
Prophecy! The curse of Cain, according to them, was now
over in the post-flood world!

Greek mythology and artwork depicted the people of Cain (i.e. the pre-flood
Cainites) as being pounded,
or
crushed, into the earth at this time; crushed by those "evil" Sethites of God. When the flood came, it
swept everything that was "cursed" far away. The “ways” of Cain were considered
dead and gone
reduced to a pile of “nothingness.”[6]
Then, the Greeks stated that their state of worthlessness wouldn't last
forever! The seed-line, or “ways,"
of Cain were, in actuality, “invulnerable!”[7] They would not be crushed like this forever. They equated this
pounding of Cain as the end of the line for the Genesis 3:15 Prophecy![8] The flood allowed for an end to
this curse but
did not end the rebellious people of Cain's blood-line, or the rebellious people who followed
these “ways” of Cain![9] Ultimately, any
curse that Noah and his God inflicted upon those of Cain and the
Serpent were, now ,“neutralized.”

As a result, these “ways” would be able to thrive again;
unabated! If we try to think about it (in their own
twisted mindset), the “ways” of Cain and the Serpent were "victorious," then, because they were able to
withstand the power of those “oppressive” Sethites, and any God behind them![10]
The curse of Cain was over; the Genesis 3:15 prophecy fulfilled (at least, in their minds). Because of these
perceptions, their politics they believed in, and the religious dogma they followed,
must have been the
superior. The ways that Noah preached, and the God he represented, now have to be “on their way out.”

The authority of Cain, as it was before the flood, was now on the rise, again - with
Cush as its new
spokesperson.[11] Although he was given much of the credit by many, he wasn't able to do it alone. He
was assisted by at least one relative we’ve already heard of.

Naamah - "Mother Earth"

                                 (She)... signified end the rule of the Old Man of the Sea (or Noah).
                                                                                           (Johnson, 2004, p. 35)[12]

Interestingly enough, ancient Greek mythology seems to also point towards
Naamah as part of this
resurgence of Cain's “ways.” She may have eventually tried to stifle Noah’s dominion over the people, and
what he preached.

Why would she even do this to her husband? Why would she, seemingly, dump all of the morals she held
before the flood? A
Cainite in her own right, Naamah may have worked a good number of years to be a
satisfactory wife to Noah. As most of us know, there is one situation in married life that could easily turn a
wife against her husband: an
insult to her children. That's what might have happened here.
As we may recall, two out of the three famous sons of Noah may have been sired by someone other than
Naamah!
Shem and Japheth quite possibly have been the sons of Noah’s earlier wife. Naamah, very well,
could have wed Noah at a later period, and became the mother of
Ham.
As we’ll discover in the next section, certain descendants of Ham might have been participating in things
around the world that Noah did not particularly approve of. In fact, he condemned a couple of these groups!
Naturally, as any mother might, Naamah might have harbored some anger over Noah’s condemnation of
her
offspring, and not his first wife's (which, probably, was what happened)![13]

As we’ve discovered in the last section, Naamah was, most likely, hailed a “goddess” by pagans after the
flood – now, we see the probable reason
why! She eventually would champion the "ways" of Cain, not
Noah! Greek mythology and artwork seems to point to this new “goddess” as one who helped Cush turn
the world around. Angered at Noah, she decided to push these “other” ways that were gaining popularity -
and the people around her gave her this deification title because of it.

We may also recall, from the last section, that this “goddess” (Naamah) was considered goddess
of the
earth
, or “Mother Earth;” possibly because she came down from the mountain of earth the ark rested upon,
as well as being a “mother figure” to everyone on the earth at the time (hence, “
Mother Earth”).

While we’re on the subject, let’s take a deeper look at another important “symbol” of these ancient times:
the
earth.

Earth

We recall that, in ancient times, a “wing” may have been used to picture an individual with “spiritual
authority.” A “
serpent” may have referred to an individual who was “very wise.” The color “black” may have
symbolized the “darkness,” or “blight,” in one’s soul. “
Earth,” likewise, seems to have its special place in
ancient symbolism.

We recall that the
earth could easily have been associated with a mountain, or high-place – a place
(supernaturally) closer to the
Divine, or the heavens! God was said to have His own high-spot, or
mountain, near the Garden of Eden, His high-spot on top of Mount Sinai, etc. In like manner, the “goddess”
Naamah may have been elevated to “goddess of earth” because she came down from her
own high-point
of
earth.[14]
This seems to pan out further into Greek mythology. We’ll see that one of Cush’s titles, most probably,
was
Erichthonius: the “Earth-Born One.” Now, why would he be called that? As we recall, Naamah, the
“goddess” who came down from the ark-topped mountain, was not the
only one who came down in this
way.