As stated in Adam & the pre-Adamites, things in the world were very good, but not perfect. We know
that Adam was placed in the Garden of Eden as its “manager.” We’ll soon discover that, because of
other inhabitants of our ancient world, dissension would arise. There were those who had problems
with the way things were; and, as a result, there would soon be “trouble in Paradise.”

The word
Eden could have been equated to a “plain,” or plot of “uncultivated land.” From this, we can
gather the Garden may have been located in an open, uncultivated plain of land. Some other ancient
meanings of the word
Edin (in Akkadian myth) are “steppe” and “terrace.”[1] If this Edin truly was the
Biblical Eden, then the Garden would have also been a raised (or stepped) agricultural plot of ground -
a stepped terrace. There are still other ancient sources that stated the Garden was a walled enclosure.[2]
Why would it need to be a stepped, walled enclosure? According to one ancient source, Eve
proclaimed this to others around her:


                                                      God set us to guard the Garden…
                                                                         - Penitence of our Forefather Adam [44]17.3[3]


Why would the Garden need to be on a stepped plateau; why would it need to contain surrounding
walls, and from whom (or what) would it need protection from?[4] From
Adam & the pre-Adamites, we
assume there were angels around at this time.

















Something truly negative must have occurred within a number of them. From ancient texts, we
surmise there were at least three different groups of angels who fell from grace, because of their
negative attitude towards Adam, and his kind.[5] These highly-esteemed angels would rebel against
God, and get demoted from their once-lofty positions. The first couple of occurrences probably took place
around the time of Adam’s dominion in the Garden. The third probably occurred a thousand or so years
later, around the time of Noah. Let’s look at the reason for the first couple of rebellions:


When... (God) desired to create man, He said to the angels, “Let us make man in our image...” He want-
ed to make him a leader over all the angels above, so that he might govern all the angels and they
would be under his rule…
                                                - Zohar Beresheet A20[6]


On top of this, God wanted the angels and other groups of human beings to understand one more thing
about this final formulation:


    Just as all of you praise Me in the heights of heaven so he (Adam) professes My Unity on earth…
                                                                                  - Pirke deR. Eliezer XIII[7]


Adam, especially, was given the crown of glory and honor over the earth - dominion over all of the works
of God’s hands, and this included the surrounding angels.[8] This is touched on (possibly) in the Bible:


                     And again, when he (God) bringeth in the firstbegotten into the world, he saith,
                                                  And let all the angels of God worship him.
                                                                                         - Heb. 1:6 (KJV)


Adam, as we’re sure, felt honored, but almost every ancient source stated he remained
humble through-
out the whole time.[9] Some angels weren’t angry, and didn’t complain. Others, however, would not have
any part of this hierarchy. Their subjection to a being they deemed
inferior was more than a lot of them
could handle. Soon, there would be vast migrations of angels, apart from God’s reorganized cosmos.
Ultimately, the world, as Adam was given it, was about to change. Satan was probably an angel of the
heavenly realm, since he once even guarded God’s throne. Heavenly angels may have a body that is, for
the most part, made out of a divine “fire.”[10]


               And the Jinn (angel) race, We had created before, from the fire of a scorching wind.
                                                                                    - The Qur’an 015:027[11]


Because God wanted angels to prostrate themselves before a man of dust, Satan was the first to dissent.
Dust, in the supernatural sense, is a substance of little significance. Satan – an angel of fire - was now
ordered to prostrate himself before this humble being of lowly dust.


And when the prince of the lower order of angels saw what great majesty had been given unto Adam,
he was jealous of him from that day, and he did not wish to worship him. And he said unto his hosts,
“Ye shall not worship him, and ye shall not praise him with the angels. It is meet that ye should worship
me, because I am fire and spirit; and not that I should worship a thing of dust, which hath been fashion-
ed of fine dust”…
                       - Cave of Treasures The Revolt of Satan, and the Battle in Heaven[12]


Why should this son of fire bow down to a son of clay?[13] Satan thought the opposite should occur:
man should bow to
him instead.[14] As a consequence of his arrogance, God made his ruling: Satan,
once with power over the earth (until Adam came around), now had his authority taken from him.
Satan no longer was a leader or even keeper of the Garden. He wasn’t even allowed inside![15]


God cast him (Satan) out what had been before an angel of the earth, and keeper of terrestrial
things...
                                                                                   (Baring-Gould, 1881, p. 18)[16]
Rebellious Angels and Serpents
                                                   Copyright 2010, Brett T., All Rights Reserved.
   
    No content of this article or of mysterybabylon.com may be reproduced, duplicated, given away,
    
                transmitted or resold in any form without prior written permission from the author.
                                                                                                 Footnotes
[1]  Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia,
Garden of Eden, 2, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Garden_of_Eden (accessed April 23, 2007);
Andrew Collins,
From the Ashes of Angels (Rochester, Vermont: Bear & Company, 1996), 151.
[2]  Andrew Collins,
From the Ashes of Angels (Rochester, Vermont: Bear & Company, 1996), 151; The Theme of Paradise, 1, http:
//www.adamqadmon.com/watchers/paradise.html (accessed Feb. 10, 2001 173).
[3]  
The Penitence of our Forefather Adam, Serpent’s Approach to Paradise [44]17.3, trans. Gary A. Anderson and Michael E. Stone,
http://www2.iath.virginia.edu/anderson/viat/english/vita.arm.html (accessed Dec 26, 2009).
[4]  
The Book of Adam, [32]7.3b-[33].1, trans. J. P. Mahe, http://www.pseudepigrapha.com/pseudepigrapha/TheBookOfAdam.htm
(accessed June 27, 2005).
[5]  Andrew Collins,
From the Ashes of Angels (Rochester, Vermont: Bear & Company, 1996), 69.
[6]  
The Zohar, Volume 1, Beresheet A, Section 20. The five types of the mixed multitude, 226, https://www2.kabbalah.com/k/index.
php/p=zohar/zohar&vol=2&sec=41 (accessed Feb. 24, 2010).
[7]  
Pirke De Rabbi Eliezer, Chapter 13: The Serpent in Paradise (15A.ii.), trans. Gerald Friedlander (New York: Sepher-Hermon
Press, 1981), 91.
[8]  
The History of al-Tabari – Volume I: General Introduction and From the Creation to the Flood, The First House on Earth, 130,
trans. Franz Rosenthal (Albany: New York Press, 1989), 300.
[9]  
The Chronicles of Jerahmeel (The Hebrew Bible Historiale), 6:12, trans. M. Gaster, Ph. D. (London: The Royal Asiatic Society,
1899), 14.
[10]  
The History of al-Tabari – Volume I: General Introduction and From the Creation to the Flood, The Story of Iblis, 81, trans.
Franz Rosenthal (Albany: New York Press, 1989), 252; Psalms 104:4 (KJV); James L. Kugel,
Traditions of the Bible (Cambridge,
Massachusetts: Harvard University Press, 1998), 75.
[11]  
The Qur’an (Yusufali), 15. Al-Hijr (Al-Hijr, Stoneland, Rock City), 015.027, http://www.usc.
edu/schools/college/crcc/engagement/resources/texts/muslim/quran/015.qmt.html (accessed Dec. 30, 2010).
[12]  
The Book of the Cave of Treasures, The First Thousand Years: Adam to Yared (Jared), The Revolt of Satan, and the Battle
in Heaven, trans. Sir E. A. Wallis Budge (London: The Religious Tract Society, 1927), 55-9.
[13]  
The History of al-Tabari – Volume I: General Introduction and From the Creation to the Flood, The Story of Adam, 93, trans.
Franz Rosenthal (Albany: New York Press, 1989), 264;
The Silence of the Hosts of Angels, 4, http://adamqadmon.
com/nephilim/acollins2.html (accessed Dec. 5, 2000 212);
The Qur’an (Yusufali), 15. Al-Hijr (Al-Hijr, Stoneland, Rock City), 015.026 -
015.035, http://www.usc.edu/schools/college/crcc/engagement/resources/texts/muslim/quran/015.qmt.html (accessed Dec. 30, 2010).
[14]  
The Book of the Cave of Treasures, The First Thousand Years, The Revolt of Satan, and the Battle in Heaven, trans. Sir E. A.
Wallis Budge (London: The Religious Tract Society, 1927), 55-9.
[15]  James L. Kugel,
Traditions of the Bible (Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press, 1998), 124; The Armenian
Apocryphal Adam Literature
, The History of the Creation and Transgression of Adam 11, trans. William Lowndes Lipscomb (Ann
Arbor, Michigan: University Microfilms International, 1983), 120;
The History of al-Tabari – Volume I: General Introduction and From
the Creation to the Flood
, The Story of Iblis, 81, 82, The Story of Adam, 93 (and notes), trans. Franz Rosenthal (Albany: New York
Press, 1989), 252, 253, 264-5; S. Baring-Gould,
Legends of the Patriarchs and Prophets and Other Old Testament Characters
(New York: American Book Exchange, 1881), 39.
[16]  S. Baring-Gould,
Legends of the Patriarchs and Prophets and Other Old Testament Characters (New York: American Book
Exchange, 1881), 18.
[17]  Robert Graves and Raphael Patai,
Hebrew Myths: The Book of Genesis (Garden City, New York: Doubleday & Company,
1964), 65.
[18]  Hyman E. Goldin,
The Book of Legends: Tales From the Talmud and Midrash (New York: The Jordan Publishng Co., 1929),
16;
The History of al-Tabari – Volume I: General Introduction and From the Creation to the Flood, Adam is Taught All the Names,
98-9, trans. Franz Rosenthal (Albany: New York Press, 1989), 270-1;
The Armenian Apocryphal Adam Literature, History and
Sermon: Concerning the Creation of Adam and the Incarnation of Christ Our God 9, trans. William Lowndes Lipscomb (Ann Arbor,
Michigan: University Microfilms International, 1983), 262;
Pirke De Rabbi Eliezer, Chapter 13: The Serpent in Paradise [15A. ii.],
trans. Gerald Friedlander (New York: Sepher-Hermon Press, 1981), 91.
[19]  Louis Ginzberg,
Legends of the Jews: Volume 1, trans. Henrietta Szold (Baltimore, Maryland: The Johns Hopkins University
Press, 1909), 62.
[20]  S. Baring-Gould,
Legends of the Patriarchs and Prophets and Other Old Testament Characters (New York: American Book
Exchange, 1881), 23;
Pirke De Rabbi Eliezer, Chapter 13: The Serpent in Paradise [15A. ii.], trans. Gerald Friedlander (New York:
Sepher-Hermon Press, 1981), 91.
[21]  
Pirke De Rabbi Eliezer, Chapter 13: The Serpent in Paradise [15A.ii.], trans. Gerald Friedlander (New York: Sepher-Hermon
Press, 1981), 91.
[22]  
The Chronicles of Jerahmeel (The Hebrew Bible Historiale), 22:1, trans. M. Gaster, Ph. D. (London: The Royal Asiatic Society,
1899), 46.
[23]  Robert Graves and Raphael Patai,
Hebrew Myths: The Book of Genesis (Garden City, New York: Doubleday & Company,
1964), 62.
[24]  
Pirke De Rabbi Eliezer, Chapter 22: The Fall of the Angels [26A. i.], trans. Gerald Friedlander, 160.
[25]  
The Zohar, Volume 2, Beresheet B, Section 69. “The Nefilim were on the earth”, 423, https://www2.kabbalah.com/k/index.
php/p=zohar/zohar&vol=3&sec=142 (accessed Feb. 24, 2010).
[26]  Malcolm Godwin,
Angels: An Endangered Species (New York: Simon & Schuester, 1990), 86.
[27]  
Pirke De Rabbi Eliezer, Chapter 13: The Serpent in Paradise [15A.ii.], trans. Gerald Friedlander, 91.
[28]  
The Book of the Cave of Treasures, The First Thousand Years, The Making of Eve (notes), trans. Sir E. A. Wallis Budge
(London: The Religious Tract Society, 1927), 61.
[29]  
Vita Adae Et Evae (The Life of Adam and Eve), 16:4, trans. R. H. Charles, The Apocrypha and Pseudepigrapha of the Old
Testament
(Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1913).
[30]  David Goldstein,
Jewish Legends (Library of the World’s Myths and Legends) (New York: Peter Bedrick Books, 1933), 4.
[31]  
The Companion Bible, Appendix 19 (Grand Rapids, Michigan: Kregel Publications, 1990), 24-5.
[32]  Gary Osborn,
Shining Ones, http://garyosborn.moonfruit.com/#/shining-ones-notes/4519248692 (accessed Dec. 30, 2010).
[33]  Andrew Collins,
From the Ashes of Angels (Rochester, Vermont: Bear & Company, 1996), 50; The Doctrine of Original Sin
Part I: The Garden of Eden (No. 246)
, 8, http://www.adamqadmon.com/nephilim/gardeneden/html (accessed Feb. 10, 2001 174);
Louis Ginzberg,
The Legends of the Jews Volume V: Notes for Volume One and Two, II. Adam, 131, trans. Henrietta Szold (Balt-
imore, Maryland: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1909), 124.
[34]  Andrew Collins,
From the Ashes of Angels (Rochester, Vermont: Bear & Company, 1996), 41, 52-3; The Doctrine of Original
Sin Part I: The Garden of Eden (No. 246)
, 8, 24, http://www.adamqadmon.com/nephilim/gardeneden/html (accessed Feb. 10, 2001
174); G. H. Pember, M. A.,
Earth’s Earliest Ages and their Connection With Modern Spiritualism, Theosophy, and Buddhism (Grand
Rapids, Michigan: Kregel Publications, 1975), 112; Malcolm Godwin,
Angels: An Endangered Species (New York: Simon &
Schuester, 1990), 25-6;
The Silence of the Hosts of Angels, 4, http://www.adamqadmon.com/nephilim/acollins2/html (accessed
Dec. 5, 2000 212).
[35]  Ellen Frankel,
The Classic Tales: 4000 Years of Jewish Lore (Northvale, New Jersey: Jason Aronson Inc., 1989), 28.
[36]  Johann Andreas Eisenmenger,
The Traditions of the Jews, Contained in the Talmud and Other Mystical Writings (London:
J. Robinson, 1748), 196.
[37]  
The History of al-Tabari – Volume I: General Introduction and From the Creation to the Flood, The Story of Adam, 91, trans.
Franz Rosenthal (Albany: New York Press, 1989), 262.
[38]  
The Book of Adam, [44]16.3a – 16.4, trans. J. P. Mahe, http://www.pseudepigrapha.com/pseudepigrapha/TheBookOfAdam.
htm (accessed June 27, 2005).
[39]  
Pirke De Rabbi Eliezer, Chapter 13: The Serpent in Paradise [15A. ii.], trans. Gerald Friedlander (New York: Sepher-Hermon
Press, 1981), 92;
The Apocalypse of Moses / Apocalypsis Mosis, 16:5, 17:4, trans. R. H. Charles, http://www.pseudepigrapha.
com/pseudepigrapha/aprmose.htm (accessed June 27, 2005); James L. Kugel,
Traditions of the Bible (Cambridge, Massachusetts:
Harvard University Press, 1998), 124-5.
[40]  
The Penitence of our Forefather Adam, Temptation of Eve [44]18.3, trans. Gary A. Anderson and Michael E. Stone, http://
www2.iath.virginia.edu/anderson/viat/english/vita.arm.html (accessed Dec. 26, 2009);
The History of al-Tabari – Volume I: General
Introduction and From the Creation to the Flood
, God’s Testing of Adam, 105, 109, trans. Franz Rosenthal (Albany: New York
Press (1989), 276, 281;
The Book of Adam, [44]16.1-4, trans. J. P. Mahe, http://www.pseudepigrapha.
com/pseudepigrapha/TheBookOfAdam.htm (accessed June 27, 2005).
[41]  
The Apocalypse of Moses / Apocalypsis Mosis, 16:1 – 18:6, trans. R. H. Charles, http://www.pseudepigrapha.
com/pseudepigrapha/aprmose.htm (accessed June 27, 2005).
[42]  
The Book of Enoch, 10:9, trans. R. H. Charles (Montana: Kessinger Publishing, 1912).

The stage was set: Eve would be all alone, one day. The Serpent was going to use every trick up his
proverbial sleeve to deceive Adam’s newly-formed wife. He obviously was endowed with gifts of self-
awareness and reason, as well, an understanding of free will and suggestion. He, ultimately, still
maintained superior intelligence. He used all he possibly could to cause Eve to think twice about her
role in the Garden, what God said, and what to do next. He ultimately wanted to make her feel insecure
about her own position.

The Serpent’s superior knowledge enabled him to badger Eve with questions like: “Yea, hath God said
(Genesis 3:1),” to make her doubt God’s word from the forefront. There could be another reason this
Serpent despised Adam, beyond his own demotion. In
Fornication - Eve & the Serpent, we’ll discover
how the Serpent utilized this subtlety, his own worldly knowledge, and one other method of manip-
ulation – a method of manipulation which, when utilized by people on a grand scale, would plague our
world from then on. This practice would be known, today, as
fornication.[42]
How would a small reptile talk to Eve anyhow? It seems that this Serpent, demoted to live like human
beings in thought and deed, makes much more sense. This Serpent (in the Bible) even had a proper
name:
Nachash. In The Companion Bible, we have an interesting interpretation of the name Nachash:


In Genesis 3 we have neither allegory, myth, legend, nor fable, but literal historical facts set forth, and
emphasized by the use of certain Figures of speech… All the confusion of thought and conflicting
exegesis have arisen from taking literally what is expressed by Figures, or from taking figuratively
what is literal… Hence, in Chaldee it (Nachash) means brass or copper, because of its shining… In
the same way Saraph, in Isaiah 6:2, 6, means a burning one, and, because the serpents mentioned in
Num. 21 were burning, in the poison of their bite, they were called Saraphim, or Seraphs… Nachash is
thus used as being interchangeable with Saraph. Now, if Saraph is used of a serpent because its bite
was burning, and is also used of a celestial or spirit being (a burning one), why should not Nachash be
used of a serpent because its appearance was shining, and be also used of a celestial or spirit-being
(a shining one)… The Nachash, or serpent, who beguiled Eve (II Cor. 11:3) is spoken of as “an angel
of light” in v. 14. Have we not, in this, a clear intimation that it was not a snake, but a glorious shining
being, apparently an angel, to whom Eve paid such great deference, acknowledging him as one who
seemed to possess superior knowledge, and who was evidently a being of a superior knowledge, and
who was evidently a being of a superior (not an inferior) order?
     - The Companion Bible Appx. 19[31]


From the above, we clearly gather that
Nachash was once a shining being – a seraph or seraphim. A
Seraphim is a high-ranking angel, with an ability to possess human attributes.[32] Was the Serpent of the
Garden a glorious, shining
Seraph?[33] The word Seraphim can come from either the Hebrew seraph
(which means “to burn”) or the noun seraph (which means “fiery, flying serpent”).[34] Put the two
together, and we can see this
Seraph was also known as a “fiery, flying serpent” (Num. 21:8, Deut.
8:15, Isaiah 14:29, 30:6). Apparently, the
Serpent was envious of Adam:


Had envy not wormed its way into his (the serpent’s) soul, he…would have lived happily with Adam
and Eve… it was precisely his wisdom that led to his undoing.
                       (Frankel, 1989, p. 28)[35]


But when the Serpent came and saw the Honour that was done them he cast an envious eye upon
them, and was full of Passion and Spite against them.
                        (Eisenmenger, 1748, p. 196)[36]


We already know how envy already led to the downfall of his previous angelic estate. His attitudes
would continue in the Garden, coupled with inner passions bubbling to the surface. Some ancient
sources interpreted this as the time Satan (in spirit form) approached the
Serpent:


(Satan…) said to angels Don’t be afraid of that one Adam for I sold, and he is hollow. When I am
given authority over him, I shall ruin him.
                      - al-Tabari The Story of Adam 91[37]


A conversation arose:


…the devil (Satan) told the serpent, “I (hear) that you are wiser than all the animals… for Adam gives
food to all the animals, thus also to you. When then all the animals (i.e. angels?) come to bow down
before Adam from day to day and from morning to morning, every day, you also come to bow down.
You were created before him… and you bow down before this little one! And why do you eat (food)
inferior to Adam’s and his spouse’s and not the good fruit of paradise? But come and hearken to
me so that we may have Adam expelled from the wall of paradise just as we are outside. Perhaps we
can re-enter somehow to paradise”… “Be a sheath for me and I will speak to the woman through your
mouth a word by which we will trick (them).”
                       - Book of Adam [44]16.3a-16.4[38]


Upon Satan’s proposal, the Serpent allowed him in. Satan (symbolically)
rode atop of the Serpent (as
one would don a horse). What this means is that Satan was allowed to
possess the Serpent, and speak
through his body.[39] Satan found a door to our world, via the Serpent’s mouth.[40] Another version of
this same account is as follows:


…the devil (Satan) went to Adam’s lot, where the male creatures were… And the devil spake to the
serpent saying, “Rise up, come to me and I will tell thee a word whereby thou mayst have profit.” And
he arose and came to him. And the devil saith to him: “I hear that thou art wiser than all the beasts, and
I have come to counsel thee. Why dost thou eat of Adam’s tares and not of paradise? Rise up and we
will cause him to be cast out of paradise, even as we were cast out through him.” The serpent saith to
him, “I fear lest the Lord be wroth with me.” The devil saith to him: “Fear not, only be my vessel and I
will speak through thy mouth words to deceive him.” And instantly he hung himself from the wall of
paradise, and when the angels ascended to worship God, then Satan appeared in the form of an angel
and sang hymns like the angels… And I (Eve speaking) bent over the wall and saw him, like an angel.
But he saith to me… “What are thou doing in paradise?” And I said to him. ‘God set us to guard and to
eat of it.’ The devil answered through the mouth of the serpent… “Follow me.”
    
   
                                                       - Apocalypse of Moses / Apocalypsis Mosis 16:1-18:6[41]

Many concluded the Serpent was nothing more than
an animal – a winding, withering snake. As we look
deeper into these alternate sources, even the Bible,
we see evidence there could have been much more
to him! If we think about it, how could an animal cause
all of this deception to Eve? How could a lowly snake
turn the whole world of Adam and Eve
upside down,
unless there was something more to him? Many of us
were taught a slithery animal had conversation with Eve,
and she disobeyed God.

Although this could truly be possible, it is also quite poss-
ible the
Serpent was one of those fallen, angelic beings;
one denounced to be corporeal (more and more human).
This second group of angels, however, did possess the potential to be corporeal - appear in human form.
Now, because of their dissidence, they were also denied return to their higher estates, and their “demotion”
became
permanent. Their loss of former “estate” was a huge blow to their feelings of superiority, as well...


…there are heretical accounts which suggest that when angels sin they “clothe themselves with the
corruptibility of the flesh.”
                                                                     (Godwin, 1990, p. 86)[26]


This probably made them more resentful to Adam! These angels then, cried out: “If we do not take
counsel against this man so that he will sin before his Creator, then we will not prevail against him.”[27]
So, their new task, their new goal, was to make Adam fall - at any price.

Adam and Eve, of course, were allowed into the “paradise on earth” known as Eden. Others, as we
postulated, were not. According to one ancient source (
The Book of the Cave of Treasures), “in it (the
Garden) dwelt the souls of the righteous. The souls of sinners dwelt in a deep place, outside Eden.”[28]
Only a few of these “fallen” angels were now allowed in. Yet, Adam still needed some angels to help him
in his work. This would have been a golden opportunity for any angel who still possessed dissidence over
Adam to strike back. One of them began to envision the following:


And with guile I cheated thy (Adam’s) wife and caused thee to be expelled through her (doing) from thy
joy and luxury, as I have been driven out of my glory.
                         - Vita Adae Et Evae 16:4[29]


A number of angels truly despised the way things were. Now, there was one angel still in the position to
do something about it. This one angel (along with Satan) truly wished Adam to fail, and could have even
gone into a “pact” together, to bring him down. This mid-level “manager” of the Garden could actually
have been one of the most infamous characters of ancient history: the
Serpent of the Garden of Eden!


Before that time it (the serpent) had legs like other animals and according to one rabbinic tradition was
like a man in appearance, standing upright on two legs. Therefore, the man representations of the
temptation which depict the serpent as a snake curled round the Tree of Knowledge are really based
on a misunderstanding of the scriptural text.
                                           (Goldstein, 1933, p. 4)[30]

One of the first responsibilities of Adam was to name all the living beings around him: animals and, most
probably, human beings. Adam was lonely; probably because he noticed there were a number of the
animals and human beings who had significant others. God noticed this, and, during this naming
process, probably wanted to bring a number of women in front of Adam. Hopefully, God thought, while
Adam was naming everyone, he would find himself a companion in the process: a mate.[17] According to
ancient sources, these disgruntled angels
challenged Adam’s authority, knowledge, and understanding
of this managerial task, in his ability to name each person and animal.[18] According to one source, “The
according qualities with which Adam was blessed… aroused the envy of the angels.”[19]

These angels thought they were superior in every way, and more knowledgeable. Why would they have
to serve under this man of dust? The naming of each human and animal would
then be a test between the
angels and Adam: who ever could name a majority of them would be considered worthy enough to have
top position in the Garden (even though God already promised it to Adam)![20] God still wanted to be
fair, and prove to
everyone why Adam was the best choice. The following verses of the Bible could give
us some insight into the mind of these angels, and their dissention:


Psa. 8:
3 When I consider thy heavens, the work of thy fingers, the moon
  and the stars, which thou hast ordained;
4 What is man, that thou art mindful of him? and the son of man,
  that thou visitest him?
5 For thou hast made him a little lower than the angels, and hast
  crowned him with glory and honour.
6 Thou madest him to have dominion over the works of thy hands;
  thou hast put all things under his feet…


Armed with superior, heavenly intellect, the angels believed they had the upper hand. The competition
began; God set up the contest. Back and forth, both animals and humans walked in front of Adam and
the angels. Adam named every one of them (Genesis 2:20); the angels did not.[21] This was proof-
positive Adam was superior in his position; evident to everyone around him and, supposedly, these
grumbling angels.


Then God said to the angels, “Were you not saying, What is man, that Thou shouldst remember him?
Now his wisdom is greater than yours!”
                            - Chronicles of Jerahmeel 22:1[22]


When these angels failed in their endeavor, they were really taken back.[23] Instead of reconciling with
their defeat, things got worse – they allowed their free will, envy, and pride, to get the better of them. As
a result, these angels grumbled further, and God allowed their physical “estates” to be lowered, even
further. Now, God made them possess practically the same attributes as human beings![24] What an
insult, at least in their minds! Satan, and other heavenly angels, (probably) weren’t created with ele-
ments of our planet; we know they were in true,
spirit form. These angels could not transform them-
selves into human beings at will.[25]

Now, we understand why Adam and Eve were also
said to
guard the Garden. Satan was furious; so
furious, in fact, that he brought a hoard of dissenting
angels along with him. Apparently, the walls around
the Garden had a purpose: it served as a physical,
and
spiritual, blockade for these newfound undesir-
ables of our world.

Still other groups of angels would follow Satan’s foot-
steps, and disseminate from Adam. Eventually, the dis-
sention of these other angels would come to a head.
Their complaints would soon be addressed in one of
the first tasks Adam was involved in. Soon, he, and
the angels around him, would undertake the
endeavor of competition.