The Esau - Rome Connection
                                   …these great mysteries… are fashioned in the patriarchs… (and)
      
                                                         are pictured now... in births…
                                                                             - Origen Homilies on Genesis and Exodus, p. 176[1]

Whose
birth might we be talking about, in the upcoming story? Which Biblical character, and his mysteries,
might this quote be alluding to, in regards to our continuing
expose’ of Mystery Babylon? We will, next, be
returning to a character of Genesis. We’ll soon discover that this Biblical character was closely related, in
certain ways, to the whole drama of
Nimrod and the Babylonian Empire – a person, for sure, that most
would not expect.

As we’ll see, there seems to be very strong words for the grandson of Abraham –
Esau – by God. Why?

Malachi 1:
3 And I hated Esau, and laid his mountains and his heritage waste for the dragons of the wilderness.
4 Whereas Edom (i.e. Esau) saith, We are impoverished, but we will return and build the desolate places;
  thus saith the LORD of hosts, They shall build, but I will throw down; and they shall call them, The
  border of wickedness, and, The people against whom the LORD hath indignation for ever.

This hatred also resurfaced in the New Testament:

Rom. 9:
13 …but Esau have I hated.

The Old and New Testaments both seem to have reiterated this same thing. Why? If God is a God of love,
then why would He go to such an opposite extreme, and “
hate” someone, here? Esau must have done
something very important, and very detrimental, to our world.

Esau was in a very special position in his own right – a person in a very special position since birth. He
would be born twin brother of the man responsible for the birth of a
nation: God’s nation. His twin brother -
Jacob - would have his name changed, and go on to be the father of twelve sons - each father of the 12
tribes of
Israel.[2]

In the supernatural world, it has been said that there was an angel assigned to most of these ancient nations
of their day. Even
Sammael - the angel who possessed the Serpent in the Garden of Eden - had a nation
assigned to him. It’s probably not hard to guess which nation
Sammael was about to be associated with, as
we continue - the same people that God ended up
hating, here…

The question still beckons: why would God
hate Esau (and his descendants) so? Genetically, he did not
have the bloodline of Cush, Nimrod, or anyone else associated with Babylon! He did not have blood of
fallen, terrestrial angels; nothing like that. In fact, Esau’s bloodline was from the
opposite side of the
spectrum: he was of the direct seed of Adam, Noah; even
Abraham – one known as “the friend of God.”
Their holy and pure bloodline - beginning with Adam and Eve - was the seed line destined to crush the
Serpent’s head. He was also son of Abraham’s “promised” seed:
Isaac! On top of it, he was the twin brother
of Jacob (i.e.
Israel) – how could he go wrong?
He seemed to have all the potential in the
world to be a good person. One would assume he would be very
righteous, but, as the following story shows, he was quite the
contrary – one who headed himself towards
the
opposite moral extreme; with a Babylonian connection on top of it!

Esau, as we’ll see, would actually upstart the latest “Nimrod” of their time! Regarding the development of
Mystery Babylon, he could have been thought of as “taking over” where the previous power players -
Semiramis and Nimrod - had left off!

The Opposing Extremes

We’ve already seen something like this before, in a way – twins being born; one going in exactly the
opposite direction that most might think. We recall Cain and Abel – twins coming directly from the most evil
one of them all: the
Serpent! We’ve also discovered how one of them - Abel - actually turned out righteously;
totally contrary to what his genetic makeup should, according to many, have made him out to be!
Now, we have the
opposite scenario – both children had everything going for them, it seemed: they were
both of the promised seed-line; both lived apart from the direct influence of Babylon and other pagan
leadership. How could one of them turn out so contrary? Lesson learned: seemingly, no matter
what
bloodline one was born into; no matter what family we come from; regardless of the circumstances; we still
have the ability to choose righteousness or unrighteousness - it’s ultimately up to us.

Now, let’s see the
opposite scenario of Cain and Abel.

The Reasons for God's "Hatred"

We will now look at thing - on the other extreme - with Esau. We have his grandfather - chosen by God
Himself – to breed offspring who would eventually fulfill the prophecy of Genesis 3:15. What an honor! We
have his son
Isaac, who would conceive the child eventually known as Israel! Without a doubt, anyone -
even of the chosen seed of God Himself - still has
free will, and could choose the pathway of good or evil -
if so inclined!
Throughout this website, we’ve mentioned a couple of attributes of human decision-making. We’ve
mentioned their “genetic predispositions” (as one might call it), and their free will. Most of us could easily
conclude that people, often, are influenced by close family, by their culture, or by other people around them.
It only makes logical sense to assume that those of the same
bloodline might be prone to, at least, want to
think or act in the same ways as their relatives – its human nature! We’ve also postulated about the use of
free will in this “Nature vs. Nurture” argument - one’s own choice trumping it all.
Esau, of whom “good blood” should logically flow through him, didn’t pan out like this, at all. The reason this
is so important is because of what Esau
actually did, and the ramifications of it all, had a great effect on
humanity, as we'll see.

Two Sides to a Person

How could Isaac produce a son that God would choose as father of His nation, along with a twin brother He
hated? How could Jacob’s (Israel’s) own blood brother be one of such vile tendencies? Obviously, going
back to the Garden of Eden, and the “evil inclination,” we know these tendencies lie in each and every one
of us; whether he be Adam, Noah; even Moses. That’s why the promised seed - Jesus Christ - had to be
born in the first place; to save us from negative elements of our own existence, such as this, that we
couldn't escape on our own!
Still, we have to continually do our part, and choose right over wrong. Even those of the “chosen” seed
made a great number of
wrong choices – even all the way back to the time of one's birth.

Originally, the wife of Isaac –
Rebekah - was barren. As she’ll soon see, there was something special about
to happen. To her astonishment, she realized she was now pregnant. On top of it, she realized was going to
have
twins.

There seemed to be concerns with this pregnancy from the very
beginning, however. The two babies were
already struggling from within her![3] She would eventually discover that her babies - two of the same blood -
would become two mighty patriarchs of two opposing peoples; with
two different ways of living and thinking.
Obviously, they were born at this same starting point, but continually headed towards opposing poles.
Interestingly:

I think that this can be said also of us as individuals, that “two nations and two peoples are within you.” For
there is both a people of virtues within us and there is no less a people of vices within us.
                                                                              - Origen Homilies on Genesis and Exodus, p. 179[4]

To reiterate: we all have that “evil-inclination,” or “sinful” nature, within us (thanks to the Serpent) – call it
a
darker side to human nature; whatever. We just have to know what to do with it, or how to act on these
impulses.

Let’s look at Rebekah, the circumstances surrounding the tumultuous birth of these two individuals, and
how they began to choose different pathways in life.

In The Womb
                                                      Copyright 2015, Brett T., All Rights Reserved.
    
        No content of this article or of mysterybabylon.com may be reproduced, duplicated, given away,
     
                    transmitted or resold in any form without prior written permission from the author.

Let’s discover what the seventh “head,” or political empire, would be, by looking further into the verse:

                       And there are seven kings: five are fallen, and one is, the other is not yet come;
    
                                        and when he cometh, he must continue a short space.
                                                                               - Rev. 17:10 (KJV)

       
     And I saw one of his heads as it were wounded to death; and his deadly wound was healed...
                                                                               - Rev. 13:3 (KJV)

What does this mean? Simply, this
seventh head had not yet come (at least, not in the time Revelation
was written); but it will arise, later on in history. It will also appear as a political authority once “wounded”
(as if it were “dead”), but would rise again, and come back to life (as if it was “healed”). The
seventh
political "head" will not come to fruition until this sixth “head” was revived again.

Do we have such a possibility? We recall that the last, political "head" was Rome. The "head" that ruled
over Israel at the time Revelation was written was Rome. The final "head" of Daniel was also Rome. Could
the Roman Empire represent the sixth "head" that was once wounded; only to come
back together, in a
way, to be “revived?”

Interestingly, the last time Israel was a nation was when it was under the domain of Rome. The people of
Israel were disbursed
; not to be a nation again for almost two thousand years. In 1948, however, the nation
of Israel
was re-established. Interestingly enough, at about this same time, the influences of another city –
the city of
Rome - were about to take hold.

The
European Union was established around the same approximate time that Israel had become a nation.
Interestingly, it all went down with a treaty – of course: the "Treaty of Rome."
The nation that now encompasses Rome (i.e. Italy) was one of the founding countries of the European
Union. The Treaty of Rome did allow for a conglomerate of nations to come together once again – a
conglomerate which actually resembles a "revived" conglomeration of the ancient lands Rome once ruled
over! Had this sixth "head" of this political "beast" indeed been revived, in a way?

It surely was
of the sixth head, a political empire which was "wounded to death;" and it does look revived,
again, in this unique way.

Could the E.U. truly be the
seventh "head"?

                                           ...and when he cometh, he must continue a short space.
                                                                                        - Rev. 17:10 (KJV)

When this
seventh "head" comes, according to Revelation, “it will continue only a short space.” The
European Union has only been in existence for a little over a half a century; a far cry from the hundreds of
years these other empires had once been.

Also, according to the Bible, this seventh conglomerate will be held together by "
clay" (Daniel 2:43) - in
other words, a group of nations held together in the same way objects held together by
clay would
respond – close, but not concrete. The European Union is much of the same; currently together by a loose
and fragile agreement between countries, at best.

Also, in the Bible, there is even talk of
ten "horns" (or "kings") coming out of this conglomerate - now, who
might they be? There are a lot more than ten countries in the European Union presently.
To discover what this is, we must continue on, in Revelation 17:11–13.

            And the beast that was, and is not (a.k.a. Rome?), even he is the eighth, and is of the seven…
                                                                                       - Rev. 7:11 (KJV)

We already surmised the
seventh, revived empire was the European Union. We see, now, another
conglomeration - an
eighth - coming out of the seventh. What might have come out of the European Union,
in this way?

Simple.

For the first time, since the ancient Roman Empire, we
do have a conglomeration of countries coming
out of the E.U., in a specific way. Nations have come together to combine themselves under a single
currency. This
further conglomerate was known as the “Eurozone.” The Eurozone countries did come out
of the European Union (the
seventh “head”) on January 1st, 1999.

By the time their monetary unit – the
euro – was officially distributed, and used, as currency, Greece had
stepped in to adopt it, as well; forming
twelve primary nations. And, on Jan. 1, 2002, the initial roll-out of
currency began to be distributed to these twelve. The
eighth was underway!

All of these original 12 once belonged to the original Roman Empire:

Austria
Belgium
Finland
France
Germany
Greece
Ireland
Italy
Luxembourg
The Netherlands
Portugal
Spain

We must also note that, at the beginning of this official rollout, there were twelve countries onboard -
not the
ten that both the books of Daniel and Revelation mention. To understand what the ten “kings” (or
“horns”) might be, let’s return, again, to Revelation:

             And the ten horns which thou sawest are ten kings, which have received no kingdom as yet;
                                               but receive power as kings one hour with the beast.
                                                                                      - Rev. 17:12 (KJV)

To discover who these ten “kings” probably are, we look at Daniel, Chapter 7: Daniel, one day, had a
prophetic dream. In it, we have more information about the ten.

    …and it had ten horns. I considered the horns, and, behold, there came up among them another little
   
                   horn, before whom there were three of the first horns plucked up by the roots…
                                                                                      - Dan. 7:7-8 (KJV)

This verse is very important. Again, the King James Translators probably
tried to translate this text with the
best of intentions; but, as we see, the verse really doesn’t make much sense, as it sets. Once we look at
the
Strong’s Concordance for these original Hebrew words, we might be able to interpret the verses in a
slightly different way.

Let’s look at a couple of English words used in this verse, with their
Strong meanings:

The words “considered” and “before,” in the above, were actually translated from
two Hebrew words; not
one:

The word “considered” was translated from the Hebrew words:
1. hava - meaning “to come to pass,” “to let become known,” “come to be,” or “to fall”[155]
2.
sekal (or sakal) - meaning “wisely understand,” “to have insight,” or “contemplate”[156]

The word “before” was translated from the Hebrew words:
1. qodam – meaning “in front of,” “from before”[157]
2.
min - meaning “as a result of,” “by reason of”[158]

Combine these four meanings, and put them back into the verse, and we get a new interpretation of
Daniel 7:7-8:

…and it had ten horns. I understood what happened to (or understood the fall of) the horns: behold, there
came up among them another little horn, by reason of what happened in front of (or before) this... there
were three of the first horns plucked up by the roots…
                        - Dan. 7:7-8 (in retranslation)

In other words, Daniel, in his dream, understood “what happened to” these horns; or “the reason behind
their fall” (the fall of a few countries now established as the Eurozone): in other words, some of these
original countries would not be able to last under this new currency
; and have to drop out!
On top of it, another “little horn” (i.e. country) would have to come in “by reason of what happened
before” their fall.

Interestingly enough, if we look at things today, we
do see a number of these original Eurozone countries
(i.e. “horns”) now in jeopardy of dropping out!

The four are
Greece, Spain, Portugal, and Italy. What if three of these became “plucked up by the roots,"
or drop out of the Eurozone? There has been talk about these countries dropping out of the Eurozone for a
while, now. What if a “little horn” feels the need to step in, and adopt the euro, in order to save the euro
from total, financial collapse? It's quite possible that all of this may occur, in the not-so-distant future.

If three countries
do drop out of this original twelve, then we could come up with nine (12 – 3 = 9) countries
left. If another country comes in (i.e. the “little horn”), to try to save the euro, then we
do end up with ten
countries in the end (9 + 1 = 10)! These ten "kings” would now have their kingdoms: 9 original members,
and their savior – the 10th.

The 10th “little horn” might, possibly, be
Great Britain. Britain is different country than most of other
countries of the European Union. First, it is an island nation, just off the European mainland. The
protestant “Church of England” has long been a huge presence in their religious hierarchy, unlike most of
the European continent, which maintains a huge Catholic presence. Even the legal system of Britain is
different than most of the rest of Europe.

Britain, as a nation,
does has the strength and capability to be powerful enough to step in, and make a
difference, here. But will it?

What does this mean, if it does? If we continue in Daniel, Chapter 7, we see:

          ...and behold, in this horn [were] eyes like eyes of a man, and a mouth speaking great things.
                                                                                              - Dan. 7:8 (KJV)

If and when this event occurs (i.e. when three countries drop out of the Eurozone, and one comes in to take
its place), then the
Antichrist might also be revealed! Daniel seems to say this Antichrist would be the
leader of this “little horn.”

We also see, in The Book of Revelation:

And the ten horns which thou sawest are ten kings, which have received no kingdom as yet; but receive
power as kings one hour with the beast. These have one mind, and shall give their power and strength unto
the beast.
                                                                            - Rev. 17:12-13 (KJV)

These countries do not share such a conglomerate, yet; but they might be. And yes; they would all seem
to support the political
system, and man, known as the beast. If Britain does come in to save the euro, then
all of these other countries will follow suit
; and back it all. Is this human beast already amongst us; is this
power structure
- under him - already beginning to form?

The Bible says we aren’t going to find out exactly
who this human beast would be, before he assumes his
rise to power
; so it’s fruitless to ponder, really. But, doesn’t it seem like we nearing times such as what
the Bible stated? Many of these countries are, seemingly, already falling in place; ready to go.

We may be closer to the "end times" than most of us have ever dreamed.

Heaven help us.

There is still one more systematic “beast,” and human "beast," to discuss. We’ve already talked about
one which comes from the "sea" - the world of politics. We’ve also talked about the political leader of these
above ten kings - the human Beast. Next, we will talk about the beast (or system) that comes from the
"earth
:" the world of religion; as well as the human beast presiding over the religious world: the False
Prophet.

We will need, once again, to return to
Esau and his descendants (i.e. the Edomites) to discover more,
because he had a part in the formation of it all.

We already know Esau was not a full-blown pagan (such as Cain, Cush, and Nimrod were). No. He began
his corruption of the ways of God from
within – by slowly adding alternative thoughts, as well as paganism,
into the mix. This “mixing” of God's ways with inferior elements would eventually infiltrate into what would be
Judeo/Christian ideologies of the past, and present.

Let’s see how this
ideological corruption of God's ways would take hold, and really see why God hated
Esau, and those who followed him (in “spirit”), so much.

There is more. But, what could be all of this whoopla over one city, anyhow - the city of Rome?

We know, from
New Religion of the Madonna, that the area of Italy was one of the last holdouts of God
after the flood; where Noah and Shem both fought so assiduously to maintain. They, and their efforts,
were slowly fading, being overrun by others who, in spirit, would take after Cush, Nimrod, Semiramis, and
now Esau - anyone who would bring back the Babylonian mysteries of old, into their post-flood world.

It’s now time to look how the formation of our present world “had begun.”

It has been said that the devil hates two books of the Bible the most:
Genesis and Revelation. Why? It’s
because Genesis exposes the
origins of Sammael and the Serpent, outright – where Mystery Babylon
came from; Revelation exposes where it’s all going – what Mystery Babylon had manifested itself into.

Though we’ve discussed
Genesis a great deal, we need to delve into prophecy a bit more; and into the
book of Revelation. We’re already beginning to see some interesting thoughts on Genesis, regarding Adam,
Noah, Esau, and their future. Let’s see what the book of
Revelation says about our future, and how both
books seem to intertwine, and even parallel each other, in ways.

Back in Genesis, we understood how two individual angelic beings - Sammael (Satan) and the Serpent -
would act “beast-like;” or possess “beast-like” qualities, to help facilitate the fall of Adam and Eve. In
Revelation, there seems to be a parallel of these
two for our future: not only will we come across two human
beings (with “beast-like” qualities) in the future, we will also come across two "beast-like"
systems of
influence: two, according to the Bible,
systematic “beasts.”

The two human “beasts” were, in Revelation, simply called
The Beast and The False Prophet. The two
systems could easily be delegated as a political system and a religious system of influence upon the
world; both of which had their origins in our Babylonian system of old!

According to Revelation, this
political beast (or system of influence) would come out of the "sea" (most
probably defined as the
political arena). The religious beast will come out of the "earth" (which, as we’ll
soon see, would probably represent the world of
religion).
Revelation also stated that this “earthly,” religious, beast will "ride atop” of the political beast
(Revelation 13:12). In other words - the religious authority would tell the political authority what to do or
say: a church or religious belief will, strongly, be behind the politics of this political system.
Interestingly enough, this scenario
also seemed to a parallel in our past: we know that Sammael "rode
atop" of the Serpent in the Garden of Eden; whispering his twisted dogma and theologies to him! He told
him what to say or do.

We’ll take a look at the
political beast in this current web page; the religious in the next.

The "Heads"

As we continue to understand what makes up these “beasts,” we find out that both systems also have
seven “heads” (according to The Book of Revelation). What could the seven heads of the political beast
be? Apparently, it sta
rted to come together just after the flood - in the days of Noah.

The Genesis 3:15 Prophecy tells us that the chosen people of God - those destined to carry the seed line
of our “first” Adam to the “last” (i.e. Jesus Christ) – were to flow through, of course, the
Israelites. Much in
the Bible would revolve around this nation of Israel; from the time of Jacob and Esau on.
This
seven-headed beast could, quite possibly, have been the number of political "heads" of state who
caused the state of Israel suffer. After all, the two were, and are, moral enemies. These
seven imprisoned,
ruled over, and dominated the Israelites somewhere along the sands of time. It all makes sense, as we'll see.

Around the time when Esau grasped this “majesty” of
Mystery Babylon in his own camp, God was
about to change Jacob’s name into "
Israel." Jacob, as many of us know, was the father of this promised
nation. Over time, Jacob’s sons - the
twelve tribes of Israel - were experiencing a famine in their land, and
had to relocate to the nation of Egypt.

At first, their stay was without incident. After a while, these twelve tribes grew exponentially; and were
eventually enslaved by the corrupted leaders who would take control.
Egypt was among a number of
empires who, on and off, would adopt these pagan influences of Cush, Nimrod, and Semiramis.
Obviously, they also would go on to hold an “upper hand” over Israel, at this time. Through this, we can
very easily conclude that
Egypt would be "head number 1" - the first political empire/nation/system to
imprison God’s nation, here on earth.

Since then, the descendants of Israel were taken captive by 5 other "heads" of state: the
Assyrians, the
Babylonians (a later manifestation of the Babylonian empire, under king Nebuchanezzer), Media/Persia,
Greece, and, of course, the empire of Rome. They are, again:

1.
Egypt
2. Assyria
3. Babylonia (later Babylonia, under king Nebuchanezzer)
4. Media/Persia
5. Greece
6. Rome

The total, now, is up to six "heads."

Interestingly, there seems to be
more scriptural proof of the above. It lies in the book of Daniel, Chapter 8.
During the era that Israel was imprisoned under empirical power number “3” (i.e. Babylonia, under king
Nebuchanezzer), the prophet
Daniel implied that there would be four empires, since him, that would
continue to hold some kind of power (Dan. 7:4-7); and these, in the Bible, have been interpreted as
Babylonia (the current empire, under king Nebuchanezzer), Media/Persia, Greece, and Rome. Again:
the same empires as the above.

But, we remember the Bible stated there would be
seven "heads" to this beast; not six. By the time the
book of Revelation was written (approximately 70 A.D.), Rome (or, the Roman Empire) had its time to
dominate the children of Israel. The sixth "head" was already in place!
A verse in Revelation gives us more information on this:

             
                              And there are seven kings: five are fallen, and one is...
                                                                                             - Rev. 17:10 (KJV)

This verse seems to further prove that these "beasts" were something of a
political nature – they were,
indeed,
kings. It also seems to verify that there were six up to the time the book was written (in approx.
70 A.D.), because five kings (or empires) had indeed fallen by this time; each one “absorbed,” in a number
of ways, by the empire which conquered it. Much of the culture, traditions, and religious beliefs (i.e. their
"mysteries") were being incorporated, over and over - continually moving the pagan mysteries of old
“up the ladder” of societal evolution!
Of course it had to originate somewhere… Babylon.

From this, we also see that
Rome does have a part – it, obviously, was the sixth “head” at one time!

…in Italy, one of red Esau’s three branches did take root… (and) it would naturally follow that they would
rise up swordsmen… They would become very warlike people.
                                                                                   (J. H., 1837, p. 98-99, 103-105)[147]

In fact, the word “
Rome” had been, over the ages, equated to words such as strength and power.[148] Now,
we also see the fruition of Esau’s association with the color
red, or scarlet. We know that:

                               
    …he was blood-red, a sign of his future sanguinary nature.
                                                                                   (Ginzberg, 1909, p. 315)[149]

                         …his "red" ("edom") color indicated his bloodthirsty propensities…
                                                                                  ("Esau", n. d., p. )[150]

His descendants, also, seemed to be “eager to shed blood full of or characterized by bloodshed; bloody;”
possessing Isaac’s blessing, on top of it!
But, that’s not all that Isaac’s blessing would help them inherit…

Material Wealth & Money

                           The blessing of Isaac ran thus: "Behold, of the fat of the earth shall be thy
  
                                       dwelling," by which he meant Greater Greece, in Italy…
                                                                                         (Ginzberg, 1909, p. 339)[151]

            This is what Edom is… all about this world, riches, etc…. one that eternalized the temporal…
                                                                                         ("Edom", n. d., p. 3)[152]

Many of these Edomites – assimilating into ancient Rome – were all about desiring what the planet had to
offer them, no matter how
ruthless they had to become. This would involve, not only possessing a warlike
nature, but also acquiring riches and land. Anyone who knows the history of the Roman Empire will
understand how this would manifest itself.

Carrying on "the Spirit of Babylon"

Now, we go one rung higher into the mystery of Mystery Babylon:
-  First, the Serpent passed his “scepter” of knowledge, theology, and culture to his son Cain.
-  From Cain, it morphed into the city of
Babylon - the city he built himself (a city, as we recall, dedicated to
  his own father, and other terrestrial angels of the day).
-  Next, after the flood, this “scepter” of Serpent-authority was reconstituted by Cush, Nimrod, and
  Semiramis; with their attempts to return Babylon to its pre-flood “glory.”
-  Next, the “scepter” of authority was acquired by Esau, when he killed the current “Nimrod” over Babylon
  at the time, and stole his garments.
-  Now, a grandson of Esau (i.e. Zepho) would bring other family members into what is now Rome, and be
  accepted with “open arms.” This, eventually, helped to convert Rome into a major political power – the
  newly-formed Roman Empire; reeking of Edomite influence and authority.

Again, we see that, although the actual
city of Babylon might have faded away by this time, the majesty and
“spiritual” authority (i.e. the “scepter”) of this city, of its founder, and of the deeper, underlying theologies
associated with it, continued on. We now welcome
Esau into the fray, as the next incarnation of the system
of
Mystery Babylon.

                       How are the things of Esau searched out! how are his hidden things sought up!
                                                                                               - Obadiah 1:6 (KJV)

Babylon is alive and well,
in spirit. Interestingly, it seems:

  …(that) when he killed Nimrod, Esau assumed another birthright: that of Nimrod and his Babylonian rule.
                                                                                      (Weisman, 1991, p. 122)[153]

Esau
did lose his birthright, and covenant blessings of God, on that day; but picked up another… the
majesty and authority of Babylon! These pagan, Serpent-given ways of the world represented the
birthright assumed by Esau and any of his Edomite descendants who followed him – under the guise of
the newly-formed Roman Empire.

Even in the Bible, there seems to be a duality between Edom and ancient Babylon:

Remember, O LORD, the children of Edom in the day of Jerusalem; who said, Rase it, rase it, even to the
foundation thereof. O daughter of Babylon, who art to be destroyed; happy shall he be, that rewardeth thee
as thou hast served us.
                                                           - Psa. 137:7-8 (KJV)

So, now… we have them all; combined into the same lump: Esau (Edom), Kittim, Rome, Italy, and
Babylon! Obviously, Esau and his Edomite descendants weren’t really desiring what the ways of God had
to offer them. It’s pretty obvious the
real direction they were heading, and the real source of where most of
their hidden - or
mysterious – power lied:

                             Babylon… the symbol for all that is contrary to the will and ways of God.
                                                                                 (Weisman, 1991, p. 122)[154]

The Beginnings "Of The End"

Gen. 27:
34 And when Esau heard the words of his father, he cried with a great and exceeding bitter cry, and
    said unto his father, Bless me, even me also, O my father.
35 And he said, Thy brother came with subtilty, and hath taken away thy blessing.
36 And he said, Is not he rightly named Jacob? for he hath supplanted me these two times: he took
    away my birthright; and, behold, now he hath taken away my blessing. And he said, Hast thou not
    reserved a blessing for me?
38 And Esau said unto his father, Hast thou but one blessing, my father? bless me, even me also, O
    my father. And Esau lifted up his voice, and wept.

Now, the older son was made to serve the younger, like Shem told Rebekah before they were born.
Beyond having a strong desire for worldly things, Esau may have also been somewhat of a control freak.
He, now, had lost a lot of power he thought he should have had over his brother:
Interestingly,

Esau cried bitterly, not because he lost his spiritual blessings, because he (still) was not deprived the
bountiful produce of the blessed earth, and not because he was no longer able to be righteous, but
because he would not be able to make his brother his servant…
                                               - St. Ephrem the Syrian, Selected Prose Works Section 25, 3[131]

Esau made a spiritual mistake, regardless if he believed in the spiritual world, or no. He truly valued the
wrong things.

Isaac Did Bless Esau... Somewhat!

At least Esau was able to get some blessings in this world; not spiritual – not what mattered – but what
mattered to
him... what he valued:

Gen. 27:
39 And Isaac his father answered and said unto him, Behold, thy dwelling shall be the fatness of the
    earth, and of the dew of heaven from above;
40 And by thy sword shalt thou live, and shalt serve thy brother; and it shall come to pass when thou
    shalt have the dominion…

This tells us a lot. Apparently, as far as Isaac,

     He prayed for his son Jacob to have the leadership of his people and the prophecy in his descendants,
             and prayed for his son Esau to get the kingdom and power and in his descendants as well.
                                                                                            (Al-'âmili, n. d., p. 1)[132]

Vengeance

Esau assumed the role that Isaac gave him, but he was still very angry:

                   Esau spat out in vexation, and said, "He took away my birthright, and I kept silence,
                             and now that he takes away my blessing, should I also keep silence?"
                                                                                       (Ginzberg, 1909, p. 338)[133]

                    And Esau hated Jacob because of the blessing wherewith his father blessed him…
                                                                                       - Gen. 27:41 (KJV)

Esau wanted to take Jacob out, now:

                    As Esau threatened to avenge the deception, Jacob had to take refuge with Eber,
                                          the son of Shem, with whom he stayed fourteen years.
                                                                                     ("Esau", n. d., p. 4)[134]

Such murderous plans Esau cherished in his heart; but this vengeance would have to wait.[135] They both
needed to fulfill their destinies as father of a nation. Even after both of their deaths, this feud would not be
over… nor would it be for thousands of years. The struggle would continue - through their descendants -
even unto this day!

Esau/Edom to Become a Political Leader

The name “Esau,” from this point on, would alternate with the word "Edom," in the Bible:

                                         Now these are the generations of Esau, who is Edom.
                                                                                   - Gen. 36:1 (KJV)

                                 And these are the generations of Esau the father of the Edomites…
                                                                                   - Gen. 36:9 (KJV)

Why is this so important to know? It becomes very important, in regards to the world
after these patriarchs.

From these marriages of Esau, the blood of Esau, Ishmael, and Canaan were intermingled; and from them
formed a group of individuals known as the
Edomites.[136] Apparently, these descendants would begin to
follow in the footsteps of their famous patriarch, holding true the thought that:

                      …the lives of the forefathers foreshadow events in the lives of their descendants…
  
                                              The actions of the father are a sign for the children.
                                                                                      ("Edom", n. d., p. 15)[137]

Sammael

We also recall that Sammael was thought to be the spiritual representative of Esau/Edom. Interestingly
enough, Sammael was also considered the spiritual representative of another great, ancient empire: the
empire of
Rome![138]

Rome & Italy

But how could Edom equate to Rome or Italy?

For the sake of the following explanation, we need to know that, back in these early days, Rome and Italy
may also been known by other names, such as “Kytim,” “Kittim,” or “Chittim.” Ancient scholars, once, may
have used these as code words, when writing about their oppressive Roman captors.[139]
Armed with this knowledge, we’ll begin to see that
Zepho, Esau’s grandson (along with some of his
Edomite brethren), would go to Italy, and eventually subdue part of it.[140]

From
New Religion of the Madonna, we know that Italy was one of the last, great God-fearing strongholds
of the early post-flood world. Noah and Shem both fought for its soul – in hopes that its people would still
want to follow the ways of God. But, as we know, all was on the decline.

Noah had since died. Shem would eventually give up the fight, and leave the area.
Zepho and a number of
Esau’s descendants (the Edomites) would relocate to Italy, and be quickly assimilated! In fact, they began
to mean much more to these people of Italy.

Book of Jasher 61:
12 …Zepho fled from Angeas from Africa, and he went and came unto Chittim.
13 And all the people of Chittim received him with great honor, and they hired him to fight their battles
    all the days, and Zepho became exceedingly rich in those days.

These incoming Edomites weren’t the founders of Rome, but they helped to strengthen it; to make it
powerful and mighty!

                   The Jewish people always produced their kings from their own midst, while the
         
                               Edomites had to go to alien peoples to secure theirs.
                                                                                                 (Ginzberg, 1909, p. 424)[141]

The Edomites, probably because of the
blessing given to their patriarch Esau, were skilled at warrior
practices, at harshness, and at aggression. These people seemed to carry a “majestic” tone with them,
because of it. Their addition into this land probably represented the final “nail” to its political coffin –
putting away, forever, the attempts by people such as Noah and Shem to keep the government following
along a pathway which, once, was God-like.

It seemed that
Zepho was, ultimately, able to help “create the first unified Italy, which probably helped to
fashion Italy’s newly-created
Roman Empire.”[142]

Now, things are starting to become clear; and a little bit scary, as well.

Here’s where the connection between Esau, Edom, Chittim, Rome, and the Italian Peninsula begins!

Interestingly, we now see:

…the learned Jewish Rabbis have expressed their belief that there is a mystic connection between Rome
and Edom… The Talmud calls Italy and Rome “the cruel empire of Edom.”
                                                                                     (J. H., 1837, p. 77, 97)[143]

Rome and Italy, also, would seem to take on the characteristics of Edom’s famous patriarch!

Coming to Fruition - as "All-Powerful" Rome

We recall that Esau did have some love and respect for Isaac, however; which did allot him some
blessings:

                  To the great respect he manifested toward his father, the descendants of Esau owe
                                                               all their good fortune on earth.
                                                                                    (Ginzberg, 1909, p. 333)[144]

His descendants began to excel in ways their famous patriarch had; and had become known for much of
what their famous patriarch was known for!

"By Thy Sword..."

Isaac also said to his son:

                                                               "...and by thy sword shalt thou live..."
                                                                                     (Ginzberg, 1909, p. 339)[145]

Now, this particular blessing was one which came to fruition in Esau’s descendants - in Rome:[146]

Gen. 27:
22 And Jacob went near unto Isaac his father; and he felt him, and said, The voice is Jacob's voice,
    but he hands are the hands of Esau.
23 And he discerned him not, because his hands were hairy, as his brother Esau's hands: so he
    blessed him.

Isaac finally chose to do what was right, in the end.

                            The detection of the true character of Esau reconciled Isaac to the fact that he
                                                            had bestowed the blessing on Jacob...
                                                                                              ("Esau", n. d., p. 4)[127]

The Aftermath

Now, it was over; the time for Esau had truly passed; the blessing had already been given, and there was
no going back. That’s just how things worked in those days.

Esau arrived after a delay of about four hours, with nothing to show for.[128] Still, he tried to “make things
work," and tried more deception on his father:

                       …and he was compelled to kill a dog and prepare its flesh for his father's meal.
                                                                                              (Ginzberg, 1909, p. 336)[129]

…masquerading it as the game Isaac wanted.
Isaac also failed to notice that his older son gave him this forbidden food; but, regardless, Isaac had to give
Esau the bad news.[130]

Esau's Grief

                   And Isaac loved Esau, because he did eat of his venison: but Rebekah loved Jacob.
                                                                                     - Gen. 25:28 (KJV)

Isaac, soon, felt the need to give his fatherly blessing to his sons. One day, he made it known that he
wanted venison to eat. He wanted something nice before he died.[117] He requested Esau to go “hunt some
game and make me some stew that I may eat and that I myself may bless you before I die.”[118]
This was Esau’s golden opportunity. He thought he was really going to “cash in” on this one. As he set
off how to carry out this task, his negative character, again, began to show through.

                            Esau sallied forth to procure what his father desired, little reckoning the
          
                                        whence or how, whether by robbery or theft.
                                                                                     (Ginzberg, 1909, p. 330)[119]

Esau really didn’t care
how he acquired his meat for his father; and, eventually, wouldn’t really care what
his father really ate, as long as he got the blessing. All that mattered was that his father had, what tasted
like, a good meal. Deceptive Esau didn’t care
that much about Isaac.
So, without further ado, he set up a scheme to round a dinner for Isaac. But he made one fatal error.

Esav (Esau) hid these garments with Rivkah (Rebekah) and wore them when he went hunting. On the day,
when Isaac sent for him to receive the blessings, he did not take them to the field and was therefore late.
                                                                                             - Zohar 8 Toldot 7[120]

And Esau left, without the garments of Nimrod.[121]

Rebekah knew what was going on with her two sons; and also remembered what the Great
Shem once
told her (“the elder shall serve the younger”). Since Shem was a man of God, she knew what he said
would probably come true.[122] If Isaac gave
Esau the blessing, it might not help out the matter.

Rebekah, reading his (Esau’s) character aright, and knowing by mysterious foresight what degraded
peoples were to descend from him… resorted to justifiable strategy in order to circumvent his receiving the
blessing.
                                                                                       ("Esau", n. d., p. 4)[123]

Now, it was her time to act. She said to Jacob:

Gen. 27:
8 Now therefore, my son, obey my voice according to that which I command thee.
9 Go now to the flock, and fetch me from thence two good kids of the goats; and I will make them
  savoury meat for thy father, such as he loveth:
10 And thou shalt bring it to thy father, that he may eat, and that he may bless thee before his death.

Meanwhile, Esau’s hunt wasn’t going very well.

The Second "Supplant" by Jacob

Gen.
27:
13 And his mother said unto him (Jacob)… only obey my voice, and go fetch me them.
14 And he went, and fetched, and brought them to his mother: and his mother made savoury meat,
    such as his father loved.
15 And Rebekah took goodly raiment of her eldest son Esau, which were with her in the house, and
    put them upon Jacob her younger son:
16 And she put the skins of the kids of the goats upon his hands, and upon the smooth of his neck:
17 And she gave the savoury meat and the bread, which she had prepared, into the hand of her son
    Jacob.

She told Jacob to pretend he was Esau, and go to his blind father for the blessing:

Gen. 27:
19 And Jacob said unto his father… I have done according as thou badest me: arise, I pray thee, sit
    and eat of my venison, that thy soul may bless me.
20 And Isaac said unto his son, How is it that thou hast found it so quickly, my son? And he said,
    Because the LORD thy God brought it to me.

Isaac, though blind, felt that something was going on. Thoughts were going back and forth, inside his head.

Isaac's Realization

Interestingly, because of what Jacob just said to him:

Isaac concluded at once that this was not Esau, for he would not have mentioned the name of God, and he
made up his mind to feel the son before him and make sure who he was.
      (Ginzberg, 1909, p. 333)[124]

Isaac may have just realized the entire way Esau lived was “characterized by injustice and violence and
there is no justice in him.”[125] At this point, he realized who was the better son… finally:

                  …now I love Jacob more than Esau because he has done so many bad things and
                                                          lacks the ability to do what is right.
                                                                                             (Kugel, 1998, p. 368)[126]

Even though Isaac felt the need to feel Jacob – to decide if it was Esau, or not – the whole process of
"figuring out who it was" really didn’t matter to him anymore. He now knew the truth about his two sons, and
what he should do:

                           …therefore he was willing to cede his birthright and the blessing attached
                  
                                    thereto in exchange for a mess of pottage.
                                                                                             (Ginzberg, 1909, p. 321)[96]

Esau’s birthright wasn’t worth a “hill of beans” to him!

On top of it, Esau even “made game of Jacob:” making fun of Jacob to other people around him.[97]

He (Esau) invited his associates to feast at his brother's table, saying, "Know ye what I did to this Jacob? I
ate his lentils, drank his wine, amused myself at his expense, and sold my birthright to him." All that Jacob
replied was, "Eat and may it do thee good!"
                     (Ginzberg, 1909, p. 321)[98]

Nothing left for Esau to do but - eventually - accept the ramifications of what he did.

His Second Name: Edom

This is where we get another name for Esau: Edom.[99]

                            And Esau said to Jacob, Feed me, I pray thee, with that same red pottage; for I
   
                                                   am faint: therefore was his name called Edom.
                                                                                          - Gen. 25:30 (KJV)

                                                  "...Therefore was his name called Edom", i.e., Red.
                                                                                          ("Edom", n. d., p. 1)[100]

Here, since the lentils he ate were of a “red” color, the color
red – the color which, also, was associated
with him in the past - comes to fruition. Since we already know the
redness of Esau already signified his
earthly desires, as well his desires for
blood, we now see there was more:[101]

                   It seems that Red color does not have the characteristic of innocence but the contrary…
                                                                                          (J. H., 1837, p. 61)[102]

 
                                              …(it) can also denote danger – on the horizon…
                                                                           (Eisenmenger, 1748, p. 191)[103]

…so much danger for Jacob, and his Israeli descendants, in store; because of Esau!

Esau walked out of Jacob’s presence, full of belly and empty of concern; with a lot of his early
characteristics soon becoming a huge problem to their world at hand; coming, not only from him, but also
from descendants and sympathizers.

Why Isaac Still Loved Harsh Esau

Something was going on: a very large and very spiritual “changing of the guard;” with Esau turning his
back on his family, and his God... and Jacob taking over. Regardless of what happened, here, Isaac still
leaned more towards favoring his son Esau.[104]
Why? Wouldn’t he be upset at this embarrassment to the
family? To fully find this answer, we must dig a little deeper into the character of Isaac, and the relationship
he would have with Esau, as a whole.

               …he (Esau) is the same as Yitzchak (Isaac), who is of Harsh Judgment above, in holiness,
    
                             and Esav (Esau), who issued from him, is the Harsh Judgment below.
                                                                                            - Zohar 8 Toldot 3[105]

In other words, the two had some similar elements of character: Isaac was also a
harsh man, in some
respects; but still retained a great deal of respect for the Creator God. He still considered God's holiness
throughout his decision making. Esau was harsh, as well; but did not reflect God’s ways in his
understanding of the world!

Like his son, Isaac enjoyed hunting, and had grown accustomed to some of the severe, harsh necessities
that accompany this sport. This is a big reason why Isaac still favored Esau, in many ways.[106]

Blinded, Because of It

In the Bible, Isaac went totally blind, later on in life. Why? It seemed that Isaac continually kept making
errors in moral judgment. He would “blind” himself to the truth of what Esau was actually becoming (excuse
the pun), though he loved him so.[107] One tradition stated that, earlier on, Isaac’s sight began to be
afflicted, at least in part, because of the wives of Esau, and their idolatrous practices:

…Isaac had never had any such experience while he abode with his parents, and he was stung by the
smoke arising from the sacrifices offered to their idols by his daughters-in-law in his own house.
                                                                                    (Ginzberg, 1909, p. 328)[108]

Maybe Isaac could have continued to lose his sight, more and more, over the years; as if some facilitate
some desperate attempt to not be able see Esau continue on, in his evil deeds.[109]

                 Isaac went blind through grief and tears for Esau having taken four Canaanitsh women.
                                                                                    (Baring-Gould, 1881, p. 216)[110]

Esau Loved His Father - At Least Partly

Esau, in his own way, had somewhat of a mutual love for his father:

                       "My father," Esau was in the habit of saying, "is a king in my sight, and it would
   
                               ill become me to serve before him in any thing but royal apparel."
                                                                                             (Ginzberg, 1909, p. 332-333)[111]

But, as we know, Esau, a lot of the time, was not sincere. He often used deception to “get his way” with
Isaac.[112] He continued to use Isaac’s blinded love for him to his own advantage.
As a “hunter of men,” Esau would snare Isaac "with his mouth." He even used the newly-acquired garment
of Nimrod to help aid him in these deceptions:

Esau had won the affection of his father by lying words… Hypocrite that he was, he played the good son;
never ministering to his father unless tricked out in Nimrod's garments…
                                                                                            ("Esau", n. d., p. 4)[113]

This helped continue to strike Isaac - with
spiritual blindness, as well as physical blindness. “The Holy
Spirit deserted him, and he could not discern the wickedness of his older son.”[114] They seemed to have
“fed off” each other, in some strange way.

Could it have been, because of Isaac’s
shine towards Esau, that he was about to end up how he did: poor
and blind? His father Abraham, on the contrary, would live out his final days as a rich man.

Isaac loved Esau because of Venison. Had there been ample food in Isaac’s house Esau may have
despised his father’s birthright because he did not have wealth to leave him.
                                       - Ibn Ezra Commentary on the Pentateuch: Genesis (Bereshit) 253 (notes)[115]

                    Gently though Esau continued to speak to his father, he yet longed for his end to come.
                                                                                            (Ginzberg, 1909, p. 329)[116]

It's Rebekah's Turn

Even though they may have looked different at birth, these twins, assuredly, were raised in a similar fashion.
They were expected to pan out the same in all respects; but, as we'll see, their characters “could not be
judged properly.”
At least during through early childhood, Jacob and Esau might have acted so much alike they couldn't be
distinguished, one from another. As time rolled on, however (after they reached thirteen years of age),
“their radically different temperaments began to appear.”[48] The ways they looked at the world surely
“parted” at this time, as well.[49]
Rebekah, their mother, was a lot more clear-sighted to the differences between the two. She already had
ideas about her sons as they
really were, and were about to become.[50]

They were like the myrtle and the thorn-bush, which look alike in the early stages of their lives, but grow
into something different… one with a smelling fragrance, the other with thorns.
                                                                                       (Ginzberg, 1909, p. 315-16)[51]

Not surprisingly, around this time, differences began to manifest in the ways they were educated:

                    Jacob was a student… of Eber (Shem’s son)… while Esau was a ne'er-do-well…
                                                                                       ("Esau", n. d., p. 3)[52]

Jacob, not surprisingly, wanted to learn of
spiritual things; those things really mattered to him. Because of
this, he was sent to the Great
Shem, and studied under him and one of his descendants: Eber.[53] It's
interesting how the descendants of Jacob (the Israelites) were also known as the
Hebrews - which was
actually a nickname for this man,
Eber!

As
Esau grew towards manhood, he, on the other hand, would begin to steal, and act rudely to those around
him.[54] Folly and profane vices were beginning to emerge through cracks in his personality.[55]

No Priestly Desires

On top of it, one of the hardest things for Esau to “wrap his head around” was one responsibility his
birthright carried with it: to be high priest of the family! Esau, naturally, wanted all of the perks of having the
birthright, but did not really want to follow the priestly roll of his father and grandfather. For obvious
reasons, he really didn’t see the merits of this duty. It all never seemed to “pan out” like they should, in this
respect.

Whenever Esau wanted something from his father Isaac, he assumed the
perception of adhering to this
roll, and acting like he cared about the priesthood; but it just didn't seem to be in his heart.[56]

Would Not Differentiate Good and Evil

Esau did not have the desire to discern what was good and evil; what was pure and impure.[57] Contrary to
all of the values his family tried to instill in him, he began to reject any belief in the resurrection of the dead,
as well as deny any sort of life in the world to come.[58] This represented the way he was initially taught,
being the ways of God, and now becoming
twisted in the worst way.

                                                            …there is none understanding in him.
                                                                                               - Obadiah 1:7 (KJV)

Adding Pagan Elements to the Mix

At least there were some elements of his birthright Esau approved of: the wealth and property elements of
it! This began to reflect on his view of what was truly important in his world - going along the same pathway
that Cush, Nimrod, and Cain took:

                Easu would insist that there was no life except the earthly life of material pleasures…
                                                                                              (Ginzberg, 1909, p. 313)[59]

Esau soon began to substitute
pagan elements into what he was taught; till he formed his own Godly “mix”
of ideology
- adulterating the true ways of God. How would it be so easy for him to learn about these pagan
"ways" of the world? By his associations…

The Great "Sources of Grief"

One of the first major problems of Esau's life was related to who he began to take as his wives. He began to
get together with a number of pagan women, and marry them. These women would eventually lead him
towards
other gods, goddesses, and pagan practices.[60] He married a Canaanite woman; a descendant
of Ishmael. His family wanted him to keep these marriages much "closer to home." We'll soon see these
mixed marriages would help to become a “great a source of grief” to elders of his community - especially his
father Isaac.[61]

There was another characteristic of Esau; one which really helped to define his personality.

The Harsh and Mighty Hunter

Trying to ignore what he saw in these marriages, Isaac still wanted the best for both of his sons. He soon
found it apparent that, heading towards manhood, they were beginning to go down two very different paths
of morality and virtue:

…he (Isaac) sent his younger son Jacob to… study the law of the Lord… As for Esau, he refused to learn,
and he remained in the house of his father. The chase was his only occupation…
                                                                                                (Ginzberg, 1909, p. 326)[62]

Esau would soon become a skillful man of the outdoors; a hunter and man “of the field.”[63] It will be inter-
esting to see how this interest in
hunting would foreshadow certain elements of his life to come! We shall see.

The Deception

               And the boys grew up to their fifteenth year… Esau was a designing and deceitful man…
                                                                                     - Book of Jasher 26:17[64]

  
               Esau constantly practiced deception, animals trapped through trickery (i.e.) cunning…
                                               - Ibn Ezra Commentary on the Pentateuch: Genesis (Bereshit), p. 251[65]

Eventually, understanding how the skill of seducing animals worked, Esau came up with an idea: if
deception became a good way to manipulate and control the animal kingdom; why not people? Soon, he
began to use his hunting talents to “trap” people into believing
his thoughts and ideas, as well![66]

      …and as he pursued beasts, so he pursued men, seeking to capture them with cunning and deceit.
                                                                                                    (Ginzberg, 1909, p. 326)[67]

   ...Esau… knew how to entice hearts, to seduce people of the world, and not to go in the straight path…
                                                                                               - Zohar 21 Trumah 77[68]

Soon, two different ways of thinking and living were beginning to take on life, in the Godly community of
Abraham and Isaac. Ultimately:

               Both were hunters of men, Esau tried to capture them in order to turn them away from
                                                    God, and Jacob, to turn them toward God.
                                                                                                (Ginzberg, 1909, p. 316)[69]

A "Smooth" Man - In So Many Ways

Jacob, on the other hand, was not a “harsh” man in looks or character.

And Jacob said to Rebekah his mother, Behold, Esau my brother is a hairy man, and I am a smooth man.
                                                                                        - Gen. 27:11 (KJV)

Jacob was a sound individual; a man of integrity; uprightness; and one who feared God.[70] He had a
“smooth" or "simple” character; the antithesis of harsh Esau in so many ways.[71]

Their differences would now come into play.

Who "Caused" Abraham's Death

There was about to be major change in the air. The “scepter” between their old world and their present
world would continue in its passage. There came a day for this “experienced” hunter Esau to set out
towards finding his own future. With all of these other detrimental thoughts going on inside his head, Esau
soon felt it was time for him to fulfill his destiny.

Up to this day, Esau held a lot of negative thoughts in the back of his mind. He “practiced his evil
inclinations in secret. Finally he dropped his mask, and on
the day of Abraham's death he was guilty of
five crimes.”[72]

These inner ideals were about to “branch out,” and turn into what would be full blown Esau of the future.
This also would eventually become too much for his poor elders; those hoping for the best. Many
believed it was his shameful conduct which actually brought on the death of his grandfather, Abraham![73]

It seems that God was watching all of what was about to happen on this day, and may have allowed
Abraham to die for his own benefit, actually:

Then the Lord said: "I promised Abraham that he should go to his fathers in peace. Can I now permit him to
be a witness of his grandson's rebellion against God…? It is better for him to die now in peace."
                                                                                    (Ginzberg, 1909, p. 318)[74]

Abraham would not live to see how the ways of God would be so corrupted… by his own grandson, no
less![75] God saw to that.

The Story Behind the Beans

Jacob, after hearing about the death of Abraham, began to do the right thing:

                             On this occasion he was cooking lentils for his father, to serve to him
                                           as his mourner’s meal after the death of Abraham.
                                                                                   (Ginzberg, 1909, p. 319)[76]

As we’ll see, the "torch" of the patriarchs of the old world, the world of Noah, Shem, and Abraham, was
now about to pass on to
new patriarchs; beginning with the nation that Jacob would father (i.e. Israel). Of
course, the antithesis of Israel, Esau, and the people he would father, would also be put into the fray, as
well. Abraham’s death was just another sign of this change.

Esau’s “emerging out” of his childhood vices, and approaching a “man-sized” felony, really helped to
expedite this “change of hands.” Let’s see what Esau did that caused such an upheaval…

Murder, and Taking His Clothes

This want-to-be mighty hunter was about to ambush someone – someone very powerful; someone very
important to their day. He, as well, would commit murder.[77] The death of this individual would, again,
represent another part of this “torch-passing”:

Book of Jasher 27:
1 And Esau at that time, after the death of Abraham, frequently went in the field to hunt.
2 And Nimrod king of Babel, the same was Amraphel, also frequently went with his mighty men to
  hunt in the field, and to walk about with his men in the cool of the day.
3 And Nimrod was observing Esau all the days, for a jealousy was formed in the heart of Nimrod
  against Esau all the days.
4 And on a certain day Esau went in the field to hunt, and he found Nimrod walking in the
  wilderness with his two men.
5 And all his mighty men and his people were with him in the wilderness, but they removed at a
  distance from him, and they went from him in different directions to hunt, and Esau concealed
  himself for Nimrod, and he lurked for him in the wilderness.
6 And Nimrod and his men that were with him did not know him, and Nimrod and his men frequently
  walked about in the field at the cool of the day, and to know where his men were hunting in the field.
7 And Nimrod and two of his men that were with him came to the place where they were, when Esau
  started suddenly from his lurking place, and drew his sword, and hastened and ran to Nimrod and
  cut off his head.
8 And Esau fought a desperate fight with the two men that were with Nimrod, and when they called
  out to him, Esau turned to them and smote them to death with his sword.
9 And all the mighty men of Nimrod, who had left him to go to the wilderness, heard the cry at a
  distance, and they knew the voices of those two men, and they ran to know the cause of it, when
  they found their king and the two men that were with him lying dead in the wilderness.
10 And when Esau saw the mighty men of Nimrod coming at a distance, he fled, and thereby
    escaped; and Esau took the valuable garments of Nimrod, which Nimrod's father had bequeathed
    to Nimrod, and with which Nimrod prevailed over the whole land, and he ran and concealed them
 
   in his house.
16 …and Nimrod died by the sword of Esau in shame and contempt… the seed of Abraham caused
 
   his death…

What just happened, here? As one might guess, this, most assuredly, was not the same Nimrod as we’ve
known previously (i.e. the son of Semiramis). This Nimrod was killed by Shem a number of years before.
Regardless, he was probably a later heir to the throne of Babylon; another dictator who, traditionally,
desired to honor himself with this same, famous name. The adopting of famous ancestral names probably
occurred a great deal, back then.
Just as the original Nimrod was, this “Nimrod” wanted to emulate the former in thought and deed; so he
took it upon himself to be a hunter, as well. A rivalry would soon ensue within the minds of these two above
individuals (at least, in the mind of Esau). For a long time, Esau was jealous of this “Nimrod.”[78] By this one
act, Esau was, in a way, able to lay “claim” to an inheritance once possessed by Nimrod, and Babylon.
Not only did Esau snuff out this "Nimrod’s" existence, he took his royal clothes - yes, the same clothes that
Adam possessed, many years ago. We recall, it was:

                             …the garment bearing such power and authority that all men and animals
         
                                                   subjected themselves to its wearer.
                                                              ("The Jewish Legends of Jacob and Esau:
           
                                                     The Birthright and the Blessing", 2010, p. 1)[79]

When Esau wore these garments, he, too, became mighty.
Now, Esau was going to be able to maintain authority over man and beast, once he donned these clothes!
Talk about power. Talk about authority! The “mantle” had indeed passed, from one era to another.

"Cooking Up Trouble"

After the murders, Esau took to his heels, and ran; as to not get caught. “After slaying Nimrod, Esau
hastened city ward in great fear of his victim’s followers. Tired and exhausted he arrived at home to find
Jacob busy preparing a dish of lentils.”[80] Jacob was at home, preparing his pot of food; not knowing what
was to be laid upon him.

Esau was extremely grieved about what just happened
- exhausted; needing food and water.[81]
The first question Esau asked Jacob was a tell-tale sign of what kind of person he was: "Why art thou
preparing lentils?"[82] The preparation of this dish seems to be a fairly old and well-known custom of the
day: lentils were prepared for the
death of a relative. Jacob knew rightly what to do. Apparently, Esau should
have, rather, asked if someone had died![83] Apparently, Esau either forgot about the tradition, or really
didn’t care. All he cared about, seemingly, was his own self – another “telltale” sign of what kind of “ways”
he was about to portray to people in the future.

The New "Twist" in Theology Begins

We’ve already discovered how Esau already didn’t think much of the spiritual side of our world, or believe
in it altogether. This all comes into play now.

Jacob explained to Esau about the lentils:

"Because our grandfather passed away; they shall be a sign of my grief and mourning, that he may love
me in the days to come." Esau’s rebuttal to him was: "Thou fool! Dost thou really think it possible that
man should come to life again after he has been dead and has mouldered in the grave"… "Is there a future
world? Or will the dead be called back to life? If it were so, why hath not Adam returned? Hast thou heard
that Noah, through whom the world was raised anew, hath reappeared? Yea, Abraham, the friend of God,
more beloved of Him than any man, hath he come to life again?"
                                                                                     (Ginzberg, 1909, p. 319-320)[84]

Esau’s twisted thoughts and assumptions were finally coming to light:

                      …if he should do a good deed, or pray to God and not be heard, he would say, "As
                                           I pray to the idols for naught, so it is in vain to pray to God."
                                                                                     (Ginzberg, 1909, p. 340)[85]

Not only did he reject a belief in the eventual resurrection of the dead, he began to reject God, and His
ways, as they set. His sacrilege was coming full blown. Now, he was even “indulging in blasphemous
speeches.”[86] Jacob replied:

“My brother, there are two worlds before us, this world and the world to come. In this world, men eat and
drink, and traffic and marry, and bring up sons and daughters, but all this does not take place in the world to
come.”
                                                                          (Ginzberg, 1909, p. 313)[87]

Esau wasn’t buying it. He flat out denied the major tenants of God’s ways of living; he even denied there
was an afterlife. The priesthood and spiritual elements of his birthright no longer made a difference to him.
Jacob then said:

                       "If thou art of opinion that there is no future world, and that the dead do not rise to
      
                            new life, then why dost thou want thy birthright? Sell it to me, now…"
                                                                                      (Ginzberg, 1909, p. 320)[88]

Unlike Esau, Jacob cared about what really mattered: God, and spiritual elements of our universe. He
really didn’t put a lot of stock in acquiring things of this world, like Esau. He “got it;” and understood what
the ways of God really signified.[89]

Jacob then offered to make the exchange official, and ethical:

"…If it please thee, do thou take this world, and I will take the other… Verily, there is a future world, in
which the righteous receive their reward. I tell thee this, lest thou say later I deceived thee."
                                                                                      (Ginzberg, 1909, p. 320)[90]

Esau now spurned his birthright.[91] It really was of no use to him, in his strive for achieving
worldly power
and fame.[92] Since it had no value to him, why not trade it?[93]

Without really contemplating about the consequences, and/or caring, Esau
was taking a stand in this
world! He showed everyone, and his God, that he gave up all that was “from above,” and abandoned his
birthright privileges. He publicly showed the world what he stood for.

                                             …Yisrael (Israel) took above and Esau took below…
                                                                                                - Zohar 21 Trumah 79[94]

The First "Supplant" Underway

      And Jacob said, Swear to me this day; and he sware unto him: and he sold his birthright unto Jacob.
                                                                                       - Gen. 25:33 (KJV)

In a final act of “properly” securing Esau’s birthright, Jacob did a few more things to “make it official.” After
all, it really didn’t matter to Esau anyhow; as long as he was fed… right?

As naught was holy to Esau, Jacob made him swear, concerning the birthright, by the life of their father, for
he knew Esau's love for Isaac, that it was strong. Nor did he fail to have a document made out, duly signed
by witnesses, setting forth that Esau had sold him the birthright together… In addition, Jacob paid him in
coin…
                                                                             (Ginzberg, 1909, p. 321)[95]

Talk about trying to do things right! As long as Esau did not believe in it, Jacob really didn’t think it was too
much of a problem trading for it; they both got what they wanted.

Rebekah apparently suffered torturous pain because of her pregnancy.[5] It literally felt like there was battle
going on, deep down inside. She began to ask around, to other mothers, to find out just what might have
been going on. Many gave her an interesting reply:

             Rebekah asked women if they have had such a traumatic experience in the birth of a baby.
                              They said none other, except the pregnancy of Nimrod’s mother.
                                                                                             (Ginzberg, 1909, p. 314)[6]

…of all people. Could there, possibly, have been a
parallel, or connection, brewing between Nimrod and
one of her sons? We know Nimrod was evil, and pushed his evil agenda to others; but he was of a
completely different, somewhat corrupted, bloodline. How could anyone like
this be born to her?

Legend tells us that there was a reason why Rebekah started to think there were polar opposites brewing
within her body:

When Rebekah passed before a synagogue Jacob made great efforts to escape into the world, when she
passed near an idol Esau became excited and desired to come forth.
                                                                                 (S. Baring-Gould, 1881, p. 217)[7]

Whether it actually happened in this way, Rebekah was probably becoming increasingly alarmed at all of
these disturbances. Of all people, she then ventured to none other than the great
Shem himself; to find his
opinion on what was going on![8] Again, we’re starting to see that things are “all coming together,” in a way –
it’s almost like the “gavel” of the patriarchs of the past are being passed on…
again:

He said to her: "My daughter, I confide a secret to thee. See to it that none finds it out. Two nations are in
thy womb, and how should thy body contain them, seeing that the whole world will not be large enough for
them to exist in it together peaceably?”
                             (S. Baring-Gould, 1881, p. 217)[9]

                   “The older of the two will serve the younger, provided this one is pure of heart,
                                        otherwise the younger will be enslaved by the older."
                                                                                            (Ginzberg, 1909, p. 314)[10]

This conception seemed to have a lot of supernatural significances.[11] Something huge was to occur.

Just after leaving Shem, she felt the need to return home, very quickly, “because of the pangs striking
her.”[12] For some reason, right after returning from her visit to one of the greatest patriarchs of the post-
flood world, she realized it was time to give birth - to Esau and Jacob. Something strange seemed to be
going on, here.[8] The “gavel,” as we’ll see, is now being passed, from one “world” to another: from the
patriarchs of old (i.e. Shem and Nimrod) to their successors. It seems there would be
new leaders on the
horizon - with a lifelong quarrel about to ensue between these two brothers![13]

The Plot for the Birthright - Even in the Womb!

Of course, a couple of the following traditions might sound a little fascinating; even unbelievable. It’s very
understandable. We have opinion manifesting itself into tradition, here. Although no one may be able to
claim the ability to understand what goes on inside the womb, it’s just interesting to see how these
explanations might give us insight to Esau's character, and how he might have acted – even before he was
born! Esau seemed hostile to everything around him, even during
this crucial time of existence:

                            Even while in his mother's womb Esau manifested his evil disposition,
                                                   maltreating and injuring his twin brother.
                                                                                    ("Esau", n. d., p. 3)[14]

Some say, a major reason for the dispute between these two babies was over their birthright privilege.[15]
Because they were twins, a battle began to ensue: whoever came out of the womb
first would be
considered heir to the birthright!
The battle raged in her this whole time; now it was time for everyone to see it all come out to the open. It
was time to see which child would emerge first.

To clarify, what was so special about this birthright, anyhow? A birthright “denotes the special privileges and
advantages belonging to the first-born son among the Jews.”[16] It seemed the first born was also allowed
double-portions of earthly wealth, land, etc. It’s not hard to see
why a son might feel privileged by having it,
especially in those days. But, there was one
more responsibility attached to this honor - the most important
reason:

The birthright was considered “as an holy thing, not only because the priesthood was annexed to it, but
also because it was a privilege leading to Christ, and a type of his title to the heavenly inheritance.”
                                                                                        (J. H., 1837, p. 61)[17]

The bearer of this birthright was also expected to become high priest of the family.[18] This worked when an
individual actually
felt a drive towards the spiritual, not just the temporal. As we’ll see, this would prove a
dilemma for Esau – one actually had to
believe in something beyond our world to take on this necessary
role.

Nevertheless, there were elements of this birthright Esau definitely had his eye on. It seemed that, even
before they were born, Esau wanted his “piece of the pie,” and then some. He wanted the
benefits of the
birthright - no matter what; and was going to do whatever he could to get it:[19]

They tossed up and down in her womb like ocean waves, (for) each one said, “I will be born first.” Finally
Esau said to Jacob, “If you do not let me go out first, I will kill my mother and leave through the stomach
wall.” Jacob said, “This wicked one is a murderer from his inception,” and allowed (Esau) to emerge first…
                                                                                         (Schwartz, 2004, p. 350)[20]

“It was only when Esau threatened to carry his point at the expense of his mother's life that Jacob gave
way.”[21] Jacob must have had great love for his mother, even in the womb, and did not want Esau to hurt
her; so he let him come out first.[22] Esau may have even “desired to kill Jacob in the womb.”[23] Angry and
threatening, Esau eventually got his way:

       And so in the womb he was insidious, and deceitful to his brother, and so Esau took first this world…
                                                                                       - Zohar 20 Mishpatim 3[24]

Jacob was not going to go down that easily, however. Most who know of this Bible story know that Jacob
grabbed the leg (or
heel) of Esau as he was coming out of the womb; as if to say “not so fast.” We’ll delve
more into to this confrontation later on, that’s for sure…

From his actions in the womb, most anyone could assume that:

           …Esau… (was) stamped with the impression of wickedness instead of the figures of virtue…
                                              - The Works of Philo Judaeus On the Birth of Abel and the
 
                                               Sacrifices Offered By Him and By His Brother Cain, 39(135)[25]

But, why could Esau
already begin to act in these negative ways? How could the son of Isaac himself
already be associated with all of these atrocities? As one might guess:

                       Esau had Samael as his ally, who desired to slay Jacob in his mother's womb.
                                                                                         (Ginzberg, 1909, p. 313)[26]

Maybe the same nation that Esau was to be father of would be the same nation that
Sammael was assigned
to! This huge influence on Esau’s decision making was already beginning to affect his little mind. Could
there have been some kind of connection between these two; and, if so, why would Sammael work so hard
to negatively influence this person, throughout his life?[27]

Sammael

As it is written, "Jacob have I loved, but Esau have I hated." This proves the three points; Esau, the Non-
Elect, or Serpent's seed; 2nd, the principle of works distilled nto the human heart by the Serpent, and
Esau, from the source of his origin, belonging to that principle; 3rd, Jacob the woman's seed or Elect of
God, appointed to salvation by grace.
                                 ("Treatise on the Two Seeds", n. d., p. 11)[28]

First, was Esau physically of the Serpent’s seed, like Cain and Abel? Obviously,
no; but, all of us have that
“evil inclination” of Sammael and the Serpent embedded within us. Maybe Sammael concentrated
more on
manipulating Esau’s soul - his thoughts and decision making processes - because he knew of Esau's
unique position in this post-flood world!

But, regardless of how many negative spiritual influences one might inherit, Esau
still had free will to
choose. Like Abel, he, ultimately, was able to make his own choices to follow the ways of God, or not.
Cain made a good deal of wrong choices, imbued with a great deal of “bad blood” from the Serpent.
Esau, as we’ll see, made wrong choices, possibly because he had a great deal of
spiritual influences into
his mind. Either way, both of them gave in, either to their genetic predispositions, or some higher, “spiritual”
influence inside their mind.
As a quick side note: just because Esau may have inherited a lot of these spiritual tendencies to do evil,
that doesn’t mean his brother Jacob was
free and clear of any adversities in his own right. We recall that
his descendants - the children of Israel - were the coveted people of God; but they
failed a good number of
times in the Bible! They failed to stay on the spiritual “strait and narrow,” and often ended up turning their
backs on God. No one is totally immune.

Because of the blatant reversal Esau went through, however, his story becomes very important to our
understanding of what
Mystery Babylon really is, and how it had developed, over time!

…there is an awakening of Samael in a strong voice to stir accusations on the world, as is said: "He
called Esau, his eldest (bigger) son"… He is bigger, towards the camps of the Other Side; he is great, and
steers all the ships in the ocean that meet the evil wind, to sink them into the depth of his ocean.
                                                                                                 - Zohar 43 Balak 17[29]

Sammael (a.k.a. Satan) already had his way with those who followed pagan ideology, given to the populous
by followers such as Cush and Nimrod. Now, it was time for him to concentrate on the diehard followers of
God, which included those who made up this holy seed of Abraham and Isaac. Now, Sammael, through
human agents (such as Esau), would be able to pervert diehard people into following other “ways” of
thinking, different ways of behaving, or even worshipping! Again, this was probably why God
hated Esau so
much - he was one of the originators of the movement
away from God by those who were staunch followers
of God… as we’ll soon see.

Before this, there were basically two extremes – the pagan “ways” of Cain, Cush, Nimrod, and Semiramis,
and the ways of God, via Seth, Noah, and Shem. Now, even the
ways of God were about to be adulterated,
in one way or another, with inferior elements of style. The scary part is: this would also represent the
beginning of what the Bible would refer to as the concept of
antichrist, as well!

Could Sammael really have been the power behind Esau’s thoughts, or what fueled him? Was this the
beginning of the transformation of
Mystery Babylon from one realm (or “face”) into another?

Children of the Flesh Vs. Children of the Promise

"…but the children of the promise are counted for the seed…" None but Isaac's seed should inherit the
promise, and not all of them; for Esau was Isaac's son, and he was not an heir.
                                                                                     ("Treatise on the Two Seeds", n. d., p. 30)[30]

So, now, the burning question might be: how could this be? How could Sammael – Satan himself – be
allowed to continually “whisper into Esau’s ear,” when Esau was born son of the
promised seed: Isaac?

                                  It is written, for in Isaac shall thy seed be called. But there is Esau? -
 
                                                    'In Isaac', but not all [the descendants of] Isaac.
                                                                                     - The Babylonian Talmud Nedarim 31a[31]

In other words: it seems that different types of people have the ability to come out of Isaac’s loins (and most
everyone else’s). In Isaac, there was seed in him which could be referred to as the “children of the flesh,”
as well as those who would be considered the “children of the promise.”

                                     Now we, brethren, as Isaac was, are the children of promise.
                                                                                                - Gal. 4:28 (KJV)

                  And if ye be Christ's, then are ye Abraham's seed, and heirs according to the promise.
                                                                                                 - Gal. 3:29 (KJV)

The other seed in him would have a problem getting along with these “children of the promise”:

                           But as then he that was born after the flesh persecuted him that was
                                                    born after the Spirit, even so it is now.
                                                                                                 - Gal. 4:29 (KJV)

The Bible tells us this struggle would continue; even up
to this day. As we’ll see, descendants of Esau
(children of the flesh)
would continue to despise and persecute the descendants of Jacob (i.e. children
of the promise).

   
           Thus we see how Esau sprang from Isaac, and the same womb that Jacob did; for from
                           the same womb of God's providence springs the elect and non-elect…
                                                         ("Treatise on the Two Seeds", n. d., p. 31)[32]

Reiterating: the destiny of these people of old, as well as today, depended a great deal on which pathways
they
chose in life. In order for them to follow God properly, there were processes to be followed.

Grace & Faith

                As this covenant and what it contains, is a figure of the covenant, of grace, and what
        
                        is contained in it. Isaac, in this covenant, is the figure of Christ…
                                                                       ("Treatise on the Two Seeds", n. d., p. 31)[33]

Esau really did not want to understand what the
grace of God was, and how it all worked in his relationship
with the Creator. There was more he was lacking, in regard to these processes. The New Testament tells
us:

             For by grace are ye saved through faith, and that not of yourselves: it is the gift of God:
                                   Not of works, lest any man should boast (or, use his own pride).
                                                                                      - Eph. 2:8-9 (KJV)

Simply, grace is a
gift, given by God, to allow us sinners a way out of the sinful situation we’re are presently
in, at this time. We can’t do it by our
own works, or by using our own pride-based thoughts or actions. Esau
could
not accept these concepts, as part of the process of following God.
Also,

  
                                                                …The just shall live by faith.
                                                                                           - Rom. 1:17 (KJV)

Esau also would have to choose to have
faith in God - faith in God's grace. Esau chose to follow what he,
himself, thought was right; according to what his own
pride had taught him - much of the same that Cain,
Cush, Nimrod, and Semiramis would believe.

                   …many of them are of Abraham’s seed – but through Isaac and Esau, not Jacob…
                                   those who are physically of Israel, lack the faith of Abraham…
                                                      ("Esau/Edom, and the Trail of the Serpent – III", n. d., p. 7)[34]

Here is one
mystery of Mystery Babylon potentially solved: corruption in the human race could be – and is
everywhere; even in the people whose bloodline was of the “promise” seed of Adam, Noah, and Abraham!
No one is immune to either physical or
spiritual corruption; and the wrong people will even work to corrupt
those who even try to understand or administer the ways of God! That's why God truly
hates some people –
it is because they try to corrupt His Word.
As least Cain, Cush, Nimrod, and Semiramis were
open about their beliefs; they were open about their
intentions. The detestable ones, according to God, were the hypocrites – those who
claim to be Godly, but,
in reality, possess a very dark underbelly.

From this, a new battle was about to ensue: there would be people who were
viewed as if they followed the
ways of God, but, in fact, they would
twist or pervert the processes of grace and faith; as well as lead
everyone around them towards the “other side” – all for their own, selfish benefit.
This is corruption “at its core;” hypocrisy at its most lethal – a good reason why God would “
hate” those
who - physically and
philosophically – came from this side of the Serpent!

Some people, such as Esau, might not
physically be of the evil one, but philosophically, their theologies
are - that makes them just as bad. This is what one ancient accounts means when it says that Esau and
Jacob were like “good wine mixed with bad.”[35]

                            Their deeds identified with them with their father Cain, not Abraham.
                                                                ("Esau/Edom, and the Trail of the Serpent – III", n. d., p. 7)[36]

As many of us know,

                                                             ...every tree is known by its own fruit.
                                                                                         - Luke 6:44 (KJV)

These people might sound like they preach something “holy;” their words might sound like they are
close
to God; but they, in reality, do and feel the opposite.

Nature Vs. Nurture

It’s easy to assume that the most important element of a person’s life is their freewill, at least regarding the
utilization of God’s processes of grace and faith - and not their pride. What goes on inside someone’s head
is behind a lot of the
mysteries of these ancient patriarchs. His choices could “make” or “break” him, as
well as others.
God had some more powerful words for the would-be hypocrite Esau, and his generation.

  "(God speaking) ...I have made Esau bare, I have uncovered his secret places, and he shall not be able
                     to hide himself: his seed is spoiled, and his brethren, and his neighbours…"
                                                                                          - Jer. 49:10 (KJV)

God would eventually take out His judgment against Esau, and his kind, because Esau’s philosophies
would spoil, not only the seed which came from him, but many around.

Again, what
secrets or mysteries of Esau's soul would he try to hide from those around him, as well as from
God Himself? What would make God want to punish
him, his physical descendants, as well as those like him
(in “
spirit”)?
Jacob, and others who followed the ways of God, already knew:

            …(we are to)… contemplate not those things which are seen, but those which are not seen…
   
                                    not carnal but spiritual things, not present but future things.
                                                               - Origen Homilies on Genesis and Exodus, p. 179[37]

It seems that God, and His ways, were on their own way toward being infiltrated with these pagan tenants
of old, as well as
new, self-serving "ways"; both striving to lure people into concentrating only on the carnal,
temporal, or earthly elements of our own existence.

Earthly and Godly - The New Combination

As we're beginning to see, the “gavel” of these early pre-flood patriarchs were about to pass on – on
either extreme. We'll, not only, have
pagan patriarchs (such as Nimrod) passing their practices on, the
followers of God needed to pass their craft onward, too. On top of it, we
now have those who would
infiltrate the ways of God, starting their own, new “way,” and passing that on!
Let’s see some of the ways
Esau would manifest the ways of the Serpent, and elements of paganism, into
once, purely God-following communities.

The "Heel"

Esau would reflect all of this "change" - this new corruption - in elements of his own life. He would reek of
these attributes, inside and out. He would also be in the perfect position – as the brother of
Israel himself -
to do damage, and launch these corrupted atrocities against God at the core; and distribute it to his
descendants and other people around them.

We begin to see these “reflections” of Esau with a famous story in the Bible; a story that takes place all the
way back to his birth. Many of us know that Jacob grabbed Esau’s
heel as he was coming out of the womb.
As a matter of fact, this “grabbing of the heel” by Jacob helped his parents give him his name:

                                 And after that came his brother, and his hand took hold of Esau's
                                                 heel, therefore they called his name Jacob.
                                                                                 - Book of Jasher 26:15[38]

It seemed that, in the past, the circumstances of one’s
birth allowed a parent some substance to give the
baby a name; and the name
Esau might have proved significant to his life, later on (as well as the term heel).

It is written, "And after that came out his brother, and his hand took hold of Esau's heel"… What is meant
by Esau's heel? Do you really believe that his hand was grasping the other's leg? Not so. His hand was
grasping someone who
is a heel… Esau is known as the heel. From the time that Jacob followed him…
(God) called him 'heel', as Esau is of the aspect of the Serpent, as it is written concerning him, "it shall
bruise your head, and you shall bruise his heel"…  meaning you who are called 'heel' will bite first and in
the end he will bruise your head. Who is his head? It is Samael, the head of the serpent that strikes in this
world…
                                                                    - Zohar 20 Mishpatim 3[39]

In a spiritual way, this “heel” could easily become a symbol of the ideology Esau was about to help produce -
corrupted ways that will contradict - even “
bite” (i.e. strike out against) - anyone trying to faithfully follow the
correct ways of God. A
heel, interestingly enough, could also be looked upon in this negative way:

             
          …it’s the dull and ugly work that cultivates the lowest turf, dragging down the
                                                     awareness of G-d (God) to the lowest plane…
                                                                          ("Heads or Heels", n. d., p. 2)[40]

It does all make total sense, in regards to Esau, and the direction this "heel" was about to take people (as
we’ll soon see). There is more.

Red, Blood, and Earthly

As stated, there would be these "reflections" - even outer, physical significances - of Esau that would make
him stand out; all the way back to his time of birth.

                                                                    And the first came forth ruddy…
                                                                                          - Gen. 25:25 (KJV)

What this probably meant was that Esau came out of the womb with an extremely blood-red, or
rosy,
appearance; much like he had a lot of blushing going on under his skin. This blood would also go on to
become a sign of what would go on in his future – something extremely
negative, as we’ll see.

One tradition states that Esau even “sucked the mother’s blood before he was born.”[41] Esau, by his
antics, would “suck the life” out of his mother
; and, most everyone around him. The stigma of this color
would stick with him throughout the rest of his life.

                                       …his "red"… color indicated his bloodthirsty propensities…
                                                                                       ("Esau", n. d., p. 10)[42]

 
                                    …he was blood-red, a sign of his future sanguinary nature.
                                                                                        (Ginzberg, 1909, p. 315)[43]

The word
sanguinary signifies someone who is “eager to shed blood full of or characterized by bloodshed;
bloody.” All of this, as one might guess, will be a part of Esau's life, soon enough.

Hairy as an Old Man

Adam, as we know, was also thought to be ruddy, or rosy cheeked; it was easy for him to blush. Because of
this, Adam became associated with the
earth - because God fashioned him directly from the earth. Esau was
also connected with the earth, but, for a different reason. In his case, the words
red and earth had other
meanings:

            …(as far as the words)… red or… “earthly”… his name appears to mean “something made.”
                                                                             - Origen Homilies on Genesis and Exodus, p. 181[44]

Apparently, Esau came out of the womb “already made” or fashioned. Now, what would this mean?

                   The older was called Esau, because he was… fully developed when he was born…
                                                                               (Ginzberg, 1909, p. 315)[45]

… meaning he look more like a typical
adult would – much more “grown up” than a typical baby; even
a small child. As we recall,

                                              ...the first came forth ruddy, all over like a hairy mantle;
                                                                   and they called his name Esau.
                                                                                              - Gen. 25:25 (KJV)

He simply had a lot of hair to him, as an older man. When many think of an extremely
hairy individual, what
kind of individual
character might come to one's mind?

…they named him Esau. - The etymology of the name… is unclear… The Hebrew wording suggests that
he was completely developed… perfect, robust. In addition, it hints at Esau’s wild and unrefined nature…
                                                  ("What is the Meaning of the Names Esau and Jacob", n. d., p. 1)[46]

That leads us to a greater understanding of him.

"Harshly" Born

One term used to describe Esau’s character was that he was a “harsh” individual. This “manly” appearance
may have laid clues to this other characteristic; as well as give us even
more clues to Esau’s future! There
are a number of words associated with this word “harsh.” By the end of this story, we'll see how all of this
was related to his hairy, adult-like appearance at birth:

-
having an unpleasant or harmful effect because of great strength or force: too intense or powerful
- severe or cruel: not kind
- rough or unpleasant to the touch
- bitter, brutal, hardhanded, murderous, rugged
- lacking in aesthetic appeal or refinement[47]

…all of these definitive signs of Esau’s nature
to come; as well those who followed him!

The Early Years
                                                                                                       Footnotes

[1]  
Origen: Homilies on Genesis and Exodus, trans. Ronald E. Heine (Washington, D. C.: The Catholic University of America Press, 1981),
176.
[2]  Howard Schwartz,
Tree of Souls: The Mythology of Judaism (Oxford: University Press, 2004), 350.
[3]  S. Baring-Gould,
Legends of the Patriarchs and Prophets and Other Old Testament Characters (New York: American Book Exchange,
1881), 217.
[4]  
Origen: Homilies on Genesis and Exodus, trans. Ronald E. Heine (Washington, D. C.: The Catholic University of America Press, 1981),
179.
[5]  Louis Ginzberg,
The Legends of the Jews Volume I: From the Creation to Jacob, trans. Henrietta Szold (Baltimore, Maryland: The
Johns Hopkins University Press, 1909), 313.
[6]  Louis Ginzberg,
The Legends of the Jews Volume I: From the Creation to Jacob, trans. Henrietta Szold (Baltimore, Maryland: The
Johns Hopkins University Press, 1909), 314.
[7]  S. Baring-Gould,
Legends of the Patriarchs and Prophets and Other Old Testament Characters (New York: American Book Exchange,
1881), 217.
[8]  
St. Ephrem the Syrian: Selected Prose Works, Section 23, 1, trans. Edward G. Mathews, Jr. and Joseph P. Amar (Washington, D. C.:
The Catholic University of America Press, 1994), 171.
[9]  S. Baring-Gould,
Legends of the Patriarchs and Prophets and Other Old Testament Characters (New York: American Book Exchange,
1881), 217.
[10]  Louis Ginzberg,
The Legends of the Jews Volume I: From the Creation to Jacob, trans. Henrietta Szold (Baltimore, Maryland: The
Johns Hopkins University Press, 1909), 314.
[11]  J Allen,
Judah’s Sceptre, 15, http://www.giveshare.org/israel/judah/ (accessed Feb. 22, 2011).
[12]  
St. Ephrem the Syrian: Selected Prose Works, Section 23, 1, trans. Edward G. Mathews, Jr. and Joseph P. Amar (Washington, D. C.:
The Catholic University of America Press, 1994), 171.
[13]  Louis Ginzberg,
The Legends of the Jews Volume I: From the Creation to Jacob, trans. Henrietta Szold (Baltimore, Maryland: The
Johns Hopkins University Press, 1909), 314.
[14]  Jewish Encyclopedia,
Esau, 1, http://www.jewishencyclopedia.com/articles/5846-esau (accessed March 22, 2011).
[15]  Louis Ginzberg,
The Legends of the Jews Volume I: From the Creation to Jacob, trans. Henrietta Szold (Baltimore, Maryland: The
Johns Hopkins University Press, 1909), 313.
[16]  Easton’s Bible Dictionary,
Birthright, 2, http://www.bible-history.com/eastons/B/Birthright (accessed Dec. 2, 2015).
[17]  J. H.,
The Mysterious and Prophetic History of Esau Considered: In Connection With the Numerous Prophecies Concerning Edom
(1837)
(London: J. G. & F. Rivington, 1837), 61.
[18]  Easton’s Bible Dictionary,
Birthright, 2, http://www.bible-history.com/eastons/B/Birthright, Dec. 2, 2015.
[19]  Louis Ginzberg,
The Legends of the Jews Volume V: Notes for Volume One and Two, 13, 22, trans. Henrietta Szold (Baltimore,
Maryland: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1909), 271, 273.
[20]  Howard Schwartz,
Tree of Souls: The Mythology of Judaism (Oxford: University Press, 2004), 350.
[21]  Louis Ginzberg,
The Legends of the Jews Volume I: From the Creation to Jacob, trans. Henrietta Szold (Baltimore, Maryland: The
Johns Hopkins University Press, 1909), 313-314.
[22]  Howard Schwartz,
Tree of Souls: The Mythology of Judaism (Oxford: University Press, 2004), 350?.
[23]  Louis Ginzberg,
The Legends of the Jews Volume I: From the Creation to Jacob, trans. Henrietta Szold (Baltimore, Maryland: The
Johns Hopkins University Press, 1909), 313.
[24]  
The Zohar, Volume 20, Mishpatim 3, https://www2.kabbalah.com/ (accessed Feb. 25, 2010).
[25]  
The Works of Philo Judaeus, On the Birth of Abel and the Sacrifices Offered By Him and By His Brother Cain, 39(135), trans. C. D.
Yonge (London: H. G. Bohn, 1854-5).
[26]  Louis Ginzberg,
The Legends of the Jews Volume I: From the Creation to Jacob, trans. Henrietta Szold (Baltimore, Maryland: The
Johns Hopkins University Press, 1909), 313.
[27]  Johann Andreas Eisenmenger,
The Traditions of the Jews, Contained in the Talmud and Other Mystical Writings (London: J.
Robinson, 1748), 191, 207;
The Zohar, Volume 43, Balak 20, https://www2.kabbalah.com/ (accessed Feb. 25, 2010); The Zohar,
Volume 22, Terumah 68, https://www2.kabbalah.com/ (accessed Feb. 25, 2010);
The Zohar, Volume 34, Emor 34, https://
www2.kabbalah.com/ (accessed Feb. 25, 2010).
[28]  Daniel Parker,
Treatise on the Two Seeds, 11, http://www.particularbaptistlibrary.org/LIBRARY/Theology/Treaties%20on%20the
%20Two%20Seeds%20-%20Parker.pdf (accessed April 1, 2011).
[29]  
The Zohar, Volume 43, Balak 17, https://www2.kabbalah.com/ (accessed Feb. 25, 2010).
[30]  Daniel Parker,
Treatise on the Two Seeds, 30, http://www.particularbaptistlibrary.org/LIBRARY/Theology/Treaties%20on%20the
%20Two%20Seeds%20-%20Parker.pdf (accessed April 1, 2011).
[31]  
The Babylonian Talmud, Nedarim 31a, http://www.halakhah.com/nedarim/nedarim_31.html (accessed Dec. 2, 2015).
[32]  Daniel Parker,
Treatise on the Two Seeds, 31, http://www.particularbaptistlibrary.org/LIBRARY/Theology/Treaties%20on%20the
%20Two%20Seeds%20-%20Parker.pdf (accessed April 1, 2011).
[33]  Daniel Parker,
Treatise on the Two Seeds, 31, http://www.particularbaptistlibrary.org/LIBRARY/Theology/Treaties%20on%20the
%20Two%20Seeds%20-%20Parker.pdf (accessed April 1, 2011).
[34]  
Esau/Edom, and the Trail of the Serpent – III, 7, http://biblebelievers.org.au/bb980923.htm (accessed July 8, 2000 287).
[35]  
The Zohar, Bereshith 36b-37a 136b.
[36]  
Esau/Edom, and the Trail of the Serpent – III, 7, http://biblebelievers.org.au/bb980923.htm (accessed July 8, 2000 287).
[37]  
Origen: Homilies on Genesis and Exodus, , trans. Ronald E. Heine (Washington, D. C.: The Catholic University of America Press,
1981), 179.
[38]  
The Book of Jasher, 26:15, trans. Albinus Alcuin (Pomeroy, Washington: Health Research, 1966), .
[39]  
The Zohar, Volume 20, Mishpatim 3, https://www2.kabbalah.com/ (accessed Feb. 25, 2010).
[40]  Chabad.org,
Heads or Heels, n. d., 2, http://www.chabad.org/parshah/article_cdo/aid/1241660/jewish/Heads-or-Heels.htm
(accessed  Dec. 7, 2015).
[41]  S. Baring-Gould,
Legends of the Patriarchs and Prophets and Other Old Testament Characters (New York: American Book
Exchange, 1881), 217.
[42]  Jewish Encyclopedia,
Esau, n. d., 4, http://www.jewishencyclopedia.com/articles/5846-esau (accessed March 22, 2011).
[43]  Louis Ginzberg,
The Legends of the Jews Volume I: From the Creation to Jacob, trans. Henrietta Szold (Baltimore, Maryland: The
Johns Hopkins University Press, 1909), 315.
[44]  
Origen: Homilies on Genesis and Exodus, trans. Ronald E. Heine (Washington, D. C.: The Catholic University of America Press,
1981), 181.
[45]  Louis Ginzberg,
The Legends of the Jews Volume I: From the Creation to Jacob, trans. Henrietta Szold (Baltimore, Maryland: The
Johns Hopkins University Press, 1909), 315.
[46]  Michael Leo Samuel,
What is the Meaning of the Names Esau and Jacob, n. d., 1, http://rabbimichaelsamuel.com/2009/11/what-is-
the-meaning-of-the-names-esau-and-jacob/ (accessed Nov. 25, 2015).
[47]  Merriam-Webster,
harsh, n. d., 1-2, merriam-webster.com/dictionary/harsh (accessed Dec. 4, 2015).
[48]  JewishEncyclopedia.com,
Esau, 3, http://www.jewishencyclopedia.com/articles/5846-esau (accessed March 22, 2011).
[49]  Louis Ginzberg,
The Legends of the Jews Volume I: From the Creation to Jacob, trans. Henrietta Szold (Baltimore, Maryland: The
Johns Hopkins University Press, 1909), 315-316.
[50]  Louis Ginzberg,
The Legends of the Jews Volume I: From the Creation to Jacob, trans. Henrietta Szold (Baltimore, Maryland: The
Johns Hopkins University Press, 1909), 316.
[51]  Louis Ginzberg,
The Legends of the Jews Volume I: From the Creation to Jacob, trans. Henrietta Szold (Baltimore, Maryland: The
Johns Hopkins University Press, 1909), 315-316.
[52]  JewishEncyclopedia.com,
Esau, 1, http://www.jewishencyclopedia.com/articles/5846-esau (accessed March 22, 2011).
[53]  
The Midrash Rabbah, Psalms 31:7, trans. Rabbi Dr. H. Freedman and Maurice Simon (London: The Soncino Press, 1961), ;
Ronald H. Isaacs,
Legends of Biblical Heroes: A Sourcebook (Northvale, N. J.: Jason Aronson, Inc., 2002), 69.
[54]  JewishEncyclopedia.com,
Esau, 1-2, http://www.jewishencyclopedia.com/articles/5846-esau (accessed March 22, 2011); The
Works of Philo Judaeus
, Allegorical Interpretation III, 1(2), trans. C. D. Yonge (London: H. G. Bohn, 1854-1855).
[55]  JewishEncyclopedia.com,
Esau, 4, http://www.jewishencyclopedia.com/articles/5846-esau (accessed March 22, 2011); The
Works of Philo Judaeus
, On the Birth of Abel and the Sacrifices Offered By Him and By His Brother Cain 4(17), On Mating With the
Preliminary Studies 12(61), trans. C. D. Yonge (London: H. G. Bohn, 1854-1855).
[56]  Howard Schwartz,
Tree of Souls: The Mythology of Judaism (Oxford: University Press, 2004), 350; The Babylonian Talmud 8:11.
[57]  
The Zohar, Volume 44, Pinchas 68, https://www2.kabbalah.com/ (accessed Feb. 25, 2010).
[58]  Howard Schwartz,
Tree of Souls: The Mythology of Judaism (Oxford: University Press, 2004), 350; S. Baring-Gould, Legends of
the Patriarchs and Prophets and Other Old Testament Characters
(New York: American Book Exchange, 1881), 217.
[59]  Louis Ginzberg,
The Legends of the Jews Volume I: From the Creation to Jacob, trans. Henrietta Szold (Baltimore, Maryland: The
Johns Hopkins University Press, 1909), 313.
[60]  Louis Ginzberg,
The Legends of the Jews Volume I: From the Creation to Jacob, trans. Henrietta Szold (Baltimore, Maryland: The
Johns Hopkins University Press, 1909), 328, 340-341; JewishEncyclopedia.com,
Esau, 2, http://www.jewishencyclopedia.com/articles/
5846-esau (accessed March 22, 2011); Ronald H. Isaacs,
Legends of Biblical Heroes: A Sourcebook (Northvale, N. J.: Jason
Aronson, Inc., 2002), 69; S. Baring-Gould,
Legends of the Patriarchs and Prophets and Other Old Testament Characters (New York:
American Book Exchange, 1881), 217.
[61]  JewishEncyclopedia.com,
Esau, 2, http://www.jewishencyclopedia.com/articles/5846-esau (accessed March 22, 2011).
[62]  Louis Ginzberg,
The Legends of the Jews Volume I: From the Creation to Jacob, trans. Henrietta Szold (Baltimore, Maryland: The
Johns Hopkins University Press, 1909), 326.
[63]  James L. Kugel,
Traditions of the Bible (Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press, 1998), 367; Genesis 25:27 (KJV);
Howard Schwartz,
Tree of Souls: The Mythology of Judaism (Oxford: University Press, 2004), 350.
[64]  
The Book of Jasher, 26:17, trans. Albinus Alcuin (Pomeroy, Washington: Health Research, 1966), .
[65]  Ibn Ezra,
Commentary on the Pentateuch: Genesis (Bereshit) (New York: Menorah Publishing Company, Inc., 1988), 251.
[66]  James L. Kugel,
Traditions of the Bible (Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press, 1998), 367.
[67]  Louis Ginzberg,
The Legends of the Jews Volume I: From the Creation to Jacob, trans. Henrietta Szold (Baltimore, Maryland: The
Johns Hopkins University Press, 1909), 326.
[68]  
The Zohar, Volume 21, Trumah 77, https://www2.kabbalah.com/ (accessed Feb. 25, 2010).
[69]  Louis Ginzberg,
The Legends of the Jews Volume I: From the Creation to Jacob, trans. Henrietta Szold (Baltimore, Maryland: The
Johns Hopkins University Press, 1909), 316.
[70]  Ibn Ezra,
Commentary on the Pentateuch: Genesis (Bereshit) (New York: Menorah Publishing Company, Inc., 1988), 251.
[71]  Ibn Ezra,
Commentary on the Pentateuch: Genesis (Bereshit) (New York: Menorah Publishing Company, Inc., 1988), 251; Origen:
Homilies on Genesis and Exodus
, , trans. Ronald E. Heine (Washington, D. C.: The Catholic University of America Press, 1981), 181.
[72]  Louis Ginzberg,
The Legends of the Jews Volume I: From the Creation to Jacob, trans. Henrietta Szold (Baltimore, Maryland: The
Johns Hopkins University Press, 1909), 318.
[73]  JewishEncyclopedia.com,
Esau, 3, http://www.jewishencyclopedia.com/articles/5846-esau (accessed March 22, 2011).
[74]  Louis Ginzberg,
The Legends of the Jews Volume I: From the Creation to Jacob, trans. Henrietta Szold (Baltimore, Maryland: The
Johns Hopkins University Press, 1909), 318.
[75]  Howard Schwartz,
Tree of Souls: The Mythology of Judaism (Oxford: University Press, 2004), 350;
JewishEncyclopedia.com,
Esau, 3, http://www.jewishencyclopedia.com/articles/5846-esau (accessed March 22, 2011); S.
Baring-Gould,
Legends of the Patriarchs and Prophets and Other Old Testament Characters (New York: American Book Exchange,
1881), 217.
[76]  Louis Ginzberg,
The Legends of the Jews Volume I: From the Creation to Jacob, trans. Henrietta Szold (Baltimore, Maryland: The
Johns Hopkins University Press, 1909), 319.
[77]  S. Baring-Gould,
Legends of the Patriarchs and Prophets and Other Old Testament Characters (New York: American Book
Exchange, 1881), 217.
[78]  JewishEncyclopedia.com,
Esau, 3, http://www.jewishencyclopedia.com/articles/5846-esau (accessed March 22, 2011).
[79]  Heavenly Ascents,
The Jewish Legends of Jacob vs. Esau: The Birthright and the Blessing, March 4, 2010, http://
www.heavenlyascents.com/2010/03/04/the-jewish-legends-of-jacob-vs-esau-the-birthright-and-the-blessing/ (accessed Nov. 25, 2015).
[80]  Louis Ginzberg,
The Legends of the Jews Volume I: From the Creation to Jacob, trans. Henrietta Szold (Baltimore, Maryland: The
Johns Hopkins University Press, 1909), 319.
[81]  
The Book of Jasher, 27:11, trans. Albinus Alcuin (Pomeroy, Washington: Health Research, 1966), ; Ibn Ezra, Commentary on the
Pentateuch: Genesis (Bereshit)
(New York: Menorah Publishing Company, Inc., 1988), 252; JewishEncyclopedia.com, Esau, 4, http://
www.jewishencyclopedia.com/articles/5846-esau (accessed March 22, 2011).
[82]  Louis Ginzberg,
The Legends of the Jews Volume I: From the Creation to Jacob, trans. Henrietta Szold (Baltimore, Maryland: The
Johns Hopkins University Press, 1909), 319.
[83]  Howard Schwartz,
Tree of Souls: The Mythology of Judaism (Oxford: University Press, 2004), 350.
[84]  Louis Ginzberg,
The Legends of the Jews Volume I: From the Creation to Jacob, trans. Henrietta Szold (Baltimore, Maryland: The
Johns Hopkins University Press, 1909), 319-320.
[85]  Louis Ginzberg,
The Legends of the Jews Volume I: From the Creation to Jacob, trans. Henrietta Szold (Baltimore, Maryland: The
Johns Hopkins University Press, 1909), 340.
[86]  JewishEncyclopedia.com,
Esau, 4, http://www.jewishencyclopedia.com/articles/5846-esau (accessed March 22, 2011).
[87]  Louis Ginzberg,
The Legends of the Jews Volume I: From the Creation to Jacob, trans. Henrietta Szold (Baltimore, Maryland: The
Johns Hopkins University Press, 1909), 313.
[88]  Louis Ginzberg,
The Legends of the Jews Volume I: From the Creation to Jacob, trans. Henrietta Szold (Baltimore, Maryland: The
Johns Hopkins University Press, 1909), 320.
[89]  Louis Ginzberg,
The Legends of the Jews Volume I: From the Creation to Jacob, trans. Henrietta Szold (Baltimore, Maryland: The
Johns Hopkins University Press, 1909), 320.
[90]  Louis Ginzberg,
The Legends of the Jews Volume I: From the Creation to Jacob, trans. Henrietta Szold (Baltimore, Maryland: The
Johns Hopkins University Press, 1909), 320.
[91]  Howard Schwartz,
Tree of Souls: The Mythology of Judaism (Oxford: University Press, 2004), 350.
[92]  Hillel ben David / The Watchman,
Edom, 2, http://www.betemunah.org/edom.html (accessed March 16, 2011).
[93]  
St. Ephrem the Syrian: Selected Prose Works, Section 23, 2, trans. Edward G. Mathews, Jr. and Joseph P. Amar (Washington,
D. C.: The Catholic University of America Press, 1994), 171.
[94]  
The Zohar, Volume 21 Trumah 79, https://www2.kabbalah.com/ (accessed Feb. 25, 2010).
[95]  Louis Ginzberg,
The Legends of the Jews Volume I: From the Creation to Jacob, trans. Henrietta Szold (Baltimore, Maryland: The
Johns Hopkins University Press, 1909), 321; JewishEncyclopedia.com,
Esau, 4, http://www.jewishencyclopedia.com/articles/5846-esau
(accessed March 22, 2011).
[96]  Louis Ginzberg,
The Legends of the Jews Volume I: From the Creation to Jacob, trans. Henrietta Szold (Baltimore, Maryland: The
Johns Hopkins University Press, 1909), 321.
[97]  Louis Ginzberg,
The Legends of the Jews Volume I: From the Creation to Jacob, trans. Henrietta Szold (Baltimore, Maryland: The
Johns Hopkins University Press, 1909), 321.
[98]  Louis Ginzberg,
The Legends of the Jews Volume I: From the Creation to Jacob, trans. Henrietta Szold (Baltimore, Maryland: The
Johns Hopkins University Press, 1909), 321.
[99]  JewishEncyclopedia.com,
Esau, 1, http://www.jewishencyclopedia.com/articles/5846-esau (accessed March 22, 2011).
[100]  Easton’s Bible Dictionary,
Edom, 1, http://www.biblestudytools.com/dictionaries/eastons-bible-dictionary/edom.html (accessed
Nov. 25, 2015).
[101]  adamqadmon.com,
Hitchock’s Bible Names Dictionary, 18, http://www.adamqadmon.com/nephilim/definitions/biblenames
(accessed March 8, 2001).
[102]  J. H.,
The Mysterious and Prophetic History of Esau Considered: In Connection With the Numerous Prophecies Concerning Edom
(1837)
(London: J. G. & F. Rivington, 1837), 61.
[103]  Johann Andreas Eisenmenger,
The Traditions of the Jews, Contained in the Talmud and Other Mystical Writings (London: J.
Robinson, 1748), 191?.
[104]  James L. Kugel,
Traditions of the Bible (Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press, 1998), 368.
[105]  
The Zohar, Volume 8, Toldot 3, https://www2.kabbalah.com/ (accessed Feb. 25, 2010).
[106]  
The Zohar, Volume 8, Toldot 3, https://www2.kabbalah.com/ (accessed Feb. 25, 2010).
[107]  The Works of Philo Judaeus,
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