The Esau - Rome Connection
                                  …these great mysteries… are fashioned in the patriarchs… (and)
   
                                                           are pictured now... in births…
                                                                              - Origen Homilies on Genesis and Exodus, p. 176[1]

Whose
birth might we be talking about, in the upcoming story? Which Biblical character, and his mysteries,
might this quote be alluding to, in regards to our continuing
expose’ of Mystery Babylon? We will, next, be
returning to a character of Genesis. We’ll soon discover that this Biblical character was closely related, in
certain ways, to the whole drama of
Nimrod and the Babylonian Empire - a person, for sure, that most
would not expect.

As we’ll see, there seems to be very strong words for the grandson of Abraham
- Esau - by God. Why?

Malachi 1:
3 And I hated Esau, and laid his mountains and his heritage waste for the dragons of the wilderness.
4 Whereas Edom (i.e. Esau) saith, We are impoverished, but we will return and build the desolate places;
  thus saith the LORD of hosts, They shall build, but I will throw down; and they shall call them, The
  border of wickedness, and, The people against whom the LORD hath indignation for ever.

This hatred also resurfaced in the New Testament:

Rom. 9:
13 …but Esau have I hated.

The Old and New Testaments both seem to have reiterated this same thing. Why? If God is a God of love,
then why would He go to such an opposite extreme, and “
hate” someone, here? Esau must have done
something very important, and very detrimental, to our world.

Esau was in a very special position in his own right
- a person in a very special position since birth. He
would be born twin brother of the man responsible for the birth of a
nation: God’s nation. His twin brother -
Jacob - would have his name changed, and go on to be the father of twelve sons - each father of the 12
tribes of
Israel.[2]

In the supernatural world, it has been said that there was an angel assigned to most of these ancient nations
of their day. Even
Sammael - the angel who possessed the Serpent in the Garden of Eden - had a nation
assigned to him. It’s probably not hard to guess which nation
Sammael was about to be associated with, as
we continue - the same people that God ended up
hating, here…

The question still beckons: why would God
hate Esau (and his descendants) so? Genetically, he did not
have the bloodline of Cush, Nimrod, or anyone else associated with Babylon! He did not have blood of
fallen, terrestrial angels; nothing like that. In fact, Esau’s bloodline was from the
opposite side of the
spectrum: he was of the direct seed of Adam, Noah; even
Abraham - one known as “the friend of God.”
Their holy and pure bloodline - beginning with Adam and Eve - was the seed line destined to crush the
Serpent’s head. He was also son of Abraham’s “promised” seed:
Isaac! On top of it, he was the twin brother
of Jacob (i.e.
Israel) - how could he go wrong?
He seemed to have all the potential in the
world to be a good person. One would assume he would be very
righteous, but, as the following story shows, he was quite the
contrary - one who headed himself towards
the
opposite moral extreme; with a Babylonian connection on top of it!

Esau, as we’ll see, would actually upstart the latest “Nimrod” of their time! Regarding the development of
Mystery Babylon, he could have been thought of as “taking over” where the previous power players -
Semiramis and Nimrod - had left off!

The Opposing Extremes

We’ve already seen something like this before, in a way - twins being born; one going in exactly the
opposite direction that most might think. We recall Cain and Abel - twins coming directly from the most evil
one of them all: the
Serpent! We’ve also discovered how one of them - Abel - actually turned out righteously;
totally contrary to what his genetic makeup should, according to many, have made him out to be!
Now, we have the
opposite scenario - both children had everything going for them, it seemed: they were
both of the promised seed-line; both lived apart from the direct influence of Babylon and other pagan
leadership. How could one of them turn out so contrary? Lesson learned: seemingly, no matter
what
bloodline one was born into; no matter what family we come from; regardless of the circumstances; we still
have the ability to choose righteousness or unrighteousness - it’s ultimately up to us.

Now, let’s see the
opposite scenario of Cain and Abel.

The Reasons for God's "Hatred"

We will now look at thing - on the other extreme - with Esau. We have his grandfather - chosen by God
Himself
- to breed offspring who would eventually fulfill the prophecy of Genesis 3:15. What an honor! We
have his son
Isaac, who would conceive the child eventually known as Israel! Without a doubt, anyone -
even of the chosen seed of God Himself - still has
free will, and could choose the pathway of good or evil...
if so inclined!
Throughout this website, we’ve mentioned a couple of attributes of human decision-making. We’ve
mentioned their “genetic predispositions” (as one might call it), and their free will. Most of us could easily
conclude that people, often, are influenced by close family, by their culture, or by other people around them.
It only makes logical sense to assume that those of the same
bloodline might be prone to, at least, want to
think or act in the same ways as their relatives
- its human nature! We’ve also postulated about the use of
free will in this “Nature vs. Nurture” argument - one’s own choice trumping it all.
Esau, of whom “good blood” should logically flow through him, didn’t pan out like this, at all. The reason this
is so important is because of what Esau
actually did, and the ramifications of it all, had a great effect on
humanity, as we'll see.

Two Sides to a Person

How could Isaac produce a son that God would choose as father of His nation, along with a twin brother He
hated? How could Jacob’s (Israel’s) own blood brother be one of such vile tendencies? Obviously, going
back to the Garden of Eden, and the “evil inclination,” we know these tendencies lie in each and every one
of us; whether he be Adam, Noah; even Moses. That’s why the promised seed - Jesus Christ - had to be
born in the first place; to save us from negative elements of our own existence, such as this, that we
couldn't escape on our own!
Still, we have to continually do our part, and choose right over wrong. Even those of the “chosen” seed
made a great number of
wrong choices - even all the way back to the time of one's birth.

Originally, the wife of Isaac
- Rebekah - was barren. As she’ll soon see, there was something special about
to happen. To her astonishment, she realized she was now pregnant. On top of it, she realized was going to
have
twins.

There seemed to be concerns with this pregnancy from the very
beginning, however. The two babies were
already struggling from within her![3] She would eventually discover that her babies - two of the same blood -
would become two mighty patriarchs of two opposing peoples; with
two different ways of living and thinking.
Obviously, they were born at this same starting point, but continually headed towards opposing poles.
Interestingly:

I think that this can be said also of us as individuals, that “two nations and two peoples are within you.” For
there is both a people of virtues within us and there is no less a people of vices within us.

                                                                               - Origen Homilies on Genesis and Exodus, p. 179[4]

To reiterate: we all have that “evil-inclination,” or “sinful” nature, within us (thanks to the Serpent)
- call it
a
darker side to human nature; whatever. We just have to know what to do with it, or how to act on these
impulses.

Let’s look at Rebekah, the circumstances surrounding the tumultuous birth of these two individuals, and
how they began to choose different pathways in life.

In The Womb
                                                     Copyright 2015, Brett T., All Rights Reserved.
         No content of this article or of mysterybabylon.com may be reproduced, duplicated, given away,
 
                     transmitted or resold in any form without prior written permission from the author.

Rebekah apparently suffered torturous pain because of her pregnancy.[5] It literally felt like there was battle
going on, deep down inside. She began to ask around, to other mothers, to find out just what might have
been going on. Many gave her an interesting reply:

             Rebekah asked women if they have had such a traumatic experience in the birth of a baby.
 
                             They said none other, except the pregnancy of Nimrod’s mother.
                                                                                              (Ginzberg, 1909, p. 314)[6]

…of all people. Could there, possibly, have been a
parallel, or connection, brewing between Nimrod and
one of her sons? We know Nimrod was evil, and pushed his evil agenda to others; but he was of a
completely different, somewhat corrupted, bloodline. How could anyone like
this be born to her?

Legend tells us that there was a reason why Rebekah started to think there were polar opposites brewing
within her body:

When Rebekah passed before a synagogue Jacob made great efforts to escape into the world, when she
passed near an idol Esau became excited and desired to come forth.

                                                                                               (S. Baring-Gould, 1881, p. 217)[7]

Whether it actually happened in this way, Rebekah was probably becoming increasingly alarmed at all of
these disturbances. Of all people, she then ventured to none other than the great
Shem himself; to find his
opinion on what was going on![8] Again, we’re starting to see that things are “all coming together,” in a way
-
it’s almost like the “gavel” of the patriarchs of the past are being passed on…
again:

He said to her: "My daughter, I confide a secret to thee. See to it that none finds it out. Two nations are in
thy womb, and how should thy body contain them, seeing that the whole world will not be large enough for
them to exist in it together peaceably?”
                               (S. Baring-Gould, 1881, p. 217)[9]

                   “The older of the two will serve the younger, provided this one is pure of heart,
                                        otherwise the younger will be enslaved by the older."
                                                                                             (Ginzberg, 1909, p. 314)[10]

This conception seemed to have a lot of supernatural significances.[11] Something huge was to occur.

Just after leaving Shem, she felt the need to return home, very quickly, “because of the pangs striking
her.”[12] For some reason, right after returning from her visit to one of the greatest patriarchs of the post-
flood world, she realized it was time to give birth - to Esau and Jacob. Something strange seemed to be
going on, here.[8] The “gavel,” as we’ll see, is now being passed, from one “world” to another: from the
patriarchs of old (i.e. Shem and Nimrod) to their successors. It seems there would be
new leaders on the
horizon - with a lifelong quarrel about to ensue between these two brothers![13]

The Plot for the Birthright - Even in the Womb!

Of course, a couple of the following traditions might sound a little fascinating; even unbelievable. It’s very
understandable. We have opinion manifesting itself into tradition, here. Although no one may be able to
claim the ability to understand what goes on inside the womb, it’s just interesting to see how these
explanations might give us insight to Esau's character, and how he might have acted
- even before he was
born! Esau seemed hostile to everything around him, even during
this crucial time of existence:

                            Even while in his mother's womb Esau manifested his evil disposition,
                                                   maltreating and injuring his twin brother.
                                                                                           ("Esau", n. d., p. 3)[14]

Some say, a major reason for the dispute between these two babies was over their birthright privilege.[15]
Because they were twins, a battle began to ensue: whoever came out of the womb
first would be
considered heir to the birthright!
The battle raged in her this whole time; now it was time for everyone to see it all come out to the open. It
was time to see which child would emerge first.

To clarify, what was so special about this birthright, anyhow? A birthright “denotes the special privileges and
advantages belonging to the first-born son among the Jews.”[16] It seemed the first born was also allowed
double-portions of earthly wealth, land, etc. It’s not hard to see
why a son might feel privileged by having it,
especially in those days. But, there was one
more responsibility attached to this honor - the most important
reason:

The birthright was considered “as an holy thing, not only because the priesthood was annexed to it, but
also because it was a privilege leading to Christ, and a type of his title to the heavenly inheritance.”

                                                                                                 (J. H., 1837, p. 61)[17]

The bearer of this birthright was also expected to become high priest of the family.[18] This worked when an
individual actually
felt a drive towards the spiritual, not just the temporal. As we’ll see, this would prove a
dilemma for Esau
- one actually had to believe in something beyond our world to take on this necessary
role.

Nevertheless, there were elements of this birthright Esau definitely had his eye on. It seemed that, even
before they were born, Esau wanted his “piece of the pie,” and then some. He wanted the benefits of the
birthright - no matter what; and was going to do whatever he could to get it:[19]

They tossed up and down in her womb like ocean waves, (for) each one said, “I will be born first.” Finally
Esau said to Jacob, “If you do not let me go out first, I will kill my mother and leave through the stomach
wall.” Jacob said, “This wicked one is a murderer from his inception,” and allowed (Esau) to emerge first…

                                                                                                  (Schwartz, 2004, p. 350)[20]

“It was only when Esau threatened to carry his point at the expense of his mother's life that Jacob gave
way.”[21] Jacob must have had great love for his mother, even in the womb, and did not want Esau to hurt
her; so he let him come out first.[22] Esau may have even “desired to kill Jacob in the womb.”[23] Angry and
threatening, Esau eventually got his way:

      And so in the womb he was insidious, and deceitful to his brother, and so Esau took first this world…
                                                                                                - Zohar 20 Mishpatim 3[24]

Jacob was not going to go down that easily, however. Most who know of this Bible story know that Jacob
grabbed the leg (or
heel) of Esau as he was coming out of the womb; as if to say “not so fast.” We’ll delve
more into to this confrontation later on, that’s for sure…

From his actions in the womb, most anyone could assume that:

           …Esau… (was) stamped with the impression of wickedness instead of the figures of virtue…
                                                        - The Works of Philo Judaeus On the Birth of Abel and the
             
                                             Sacrifices Offered By Him and By His Brother Cain, 39(135)[25]

But, why could Esau
already begin to act in these negative ways? How could the son of Isaac himself
already be associated with all of these atrocities? As one might guess:

                       Esau had Samael as his ally, who desired to slay Jacob in his mother's womb.
                                                                                                (Ginzberg, 1909, p. 313)[26]

Maybe the same nation that Esau was to be father of would be the same nation that
Sammael was assigned
to! This huge influence on Esau’s decision making was already beginning to affect his little mind. Could
there have been some kind of connection between these two; and, if so, why would Sammael work so hard
to negatively influence this person, throughout his life?[27]

Sammael

As it is written, "Jacob have I loved, but Esau have I hated." This proves the three points; Esau, the Non-
Elect, or Serpent's seed; 2nd, the principle of works distilled nto the human heart by the Serpent, and
Esau, from the source of his origin, belonging to that principle; 3rd, Jacob the woman's seed or Elect of
God, appointed to salvation by grace.
                                  ("Treatise on the Two Seeds", n. d., p. 11)[28]

First, was Esau physically of the Serpent’s seed, like Cain and Abel? Obviously,
no; but, all of us have that
“evil inclination” of Sammael and the Serpent embedded within us. Maybe Sammael concentrated
more on
manipulating Esau’s soul - his thoughts and decision making processes - because he knew of Esau's
unique position in this post-flood world!

But, regardless of how many negative spiritual influences one might inherit, Esau
still had free will to
choose. Like Abel, he, ultimately, was able to make his own choices to follow the ways of God, or not.
Cain made a good deal of wrong choices, imbued with a great deal of “bad blood” from the Serpent.
Esau, as we’ll see, made wrong choices, possibly because he had a great deal of
spiritual influences into
his mind. Either way, both of them gave in, either to their genetic predispositions, or some higher, “spiritual”
influence inside their mind.
As a quick side note: just because Esau may have inherited a lot of these spiritual tendencies to do evil,
that doesn’t mean his brother Jacob was
free and clear of any adversities in his own right. We recall that
his descendants - the children of Israel - were the coveted people of God; but they
failed a good number of
times in the Bible! They failed to stay on the spiritual “strait and narrow,” and often ended up turning their
backs on God. No one is totally immune.

Because of the blatant reversal Esau went through, however, his story becomes very important to our
understanding of what
Mystery Babylon really is, and how it had developed, over time!

…there is an awakening of Samael in a strong voice to stir accusations on the world, as is said: "He
called Esau, his eldest (bigger) son"… He is bigger, towards the camps of the Other Side; he is great, and
steers all the ships in the ocean that meet the evil wind, to sink them into the depth of his ocean.

                                                                                                     - Zohar 43 Balak 17[29]

Sammael (a.k.a. Satan) already had his way with those who followed pagan ideology, given to the populous
by followers such as Cush and Nimrod. Now, it was time for him to concentrate on the diehard followers of
God, which included those who made up this holy seed of Abraham and Isaac. Now, Sammael, through
human agents (such as Esau), would be able to pervert diehard people into following other “ways” of
thinking, different ways of behaving, or even worshipping! Again, this was probably why God
hated Esau so
much - he was one of the originators of the movement
away from God by those who were staunch followers
of God… as we’ll soon see.

Before this, there were basically two extremes
- the pagan “ways” of Cain, Cush, Nimrod, and Semiramis,
and the ways of God, via Seth, Noah, and Shem. Now, even the
ways of God were about to be adulterated,
in one way or another, with inferior elements of style. The scary part is: this would also represent the
beginning of what the Bible would refer to as the concept of
antichrist, as well!

Could Sammael really have been the power behind Esau’s thoughts, or what fueled him? Was this the
beginning of the transformation of
Mystery Babylon from one realm (or “face”) into another?

Children of the Flesh Vs. Children of the Promise

"…but the children of the promise are counted for the seed…" None but Isaac's seed should inherit the
promise, and not all of them; for Esau was Isaac's son, and he was not an heir.

                                                                                       ("Treatise on the Two Seeds", n. d., p. 30)[30]

So, now, the burning question might be: how could this be? How could Sammael
- Satan himself - be
allowed to continually “whisper into Esau’s ear,” when Esau was born son of the
promised seed: Isaac?

                                  It is written, for in Isaac shall thy seed be called. But there is Esau? -
            
                                         'In Isaac', but not all [the descendants of] Isaac.
                                                                                       - The Babylonian Talmud Nedarim 31a[31]

In other words: it seems that different types of people have the ability to come out of Isaac’s loins (and most
everyone else’s). In Isaac, there was seed in him which could be referred to as the “children of the flesh,”
as well as those who would be considered the “children of the promise.”

                                     Now we, brethren, as Isaac was, are the children of promise.
                                                                                                   - Gal. 4:28 (KJV)

                  And if ye be Christ's, then are ye Abraham's seed, and heirs according to the promise.
                                                                                                   - Gal. 3:29 (KJV)

The other seed in him would have a problem getting along with these “children of the promise”:

                           But as then he that was born after the flesh persecuted him that was
                                                    born after the Spirit, even so it is now.
                                                                                                   - Gal. 4:29 (KJV)

The Bible tells us this struggle would continue; even up
to this day. As we’ll see, descendants of Esau
(children of the flesh)
would continue to despise and persecute the descendants of Jacob (i.e. children
of the promise).

              Thus we see how Esau sprang from Isaac, and the same womb that Jacob did; for from
                           the same womb of God's providence springs the elect and non-elect…
                                                                            ("Treatise on the Two Seeds", n. d., p. 31)[32]

Reiterating: the destiny of these people of old, as well as today, depended a great deal on which pathways
they
chose in life. In order for them to follow God properly, there were processes to be followed.

Grace & Faith

                As this covenant and what it contains, is a figure of the covenant, of grace, and what
 
                               is contained in it. Isaac, in this covenant, is the figure of Christ…
                                                                             ("Treatise on the Two Seeds", n. d., p. 31)[33]

Esau really did not want to understand what the
grace of God was, and how it all worked in his relationship
with the Creator. There was more he was lacking, in regard to these processes. The New Testament tells
us:

             For by grace are ye saved through faith, and that not of yourselves: it is the gift of God:
 
                                  Not of works, lest any man should boast (or, use his own pride).
                                                                                                  - Eph. 2:8-9 (KJV)

Simply, grace is a
gift, given by God, to allow us sinners a way out of the sinful situation we’re are presently
in, at this time. We can’t do it by our
own works, or by using our own pride-based thoughts or actions. Esau
could
not accept these concepts, as part of the process of following God.
Also,

                                                              …The just shall live by faith.
                                                                                         - Rom. 1:17 (KJV)

Esau also would have to choose to have
faith in God - faith in God's grace. Esau chose to follow what he,
himself, thought was right; according to what his own
pride had taught him - much of the same that Cain,
Cush, Nimrod, and Semiramis would believe.

                   …many of them are of Abraham’s seed - but through Isaac and Esau, not Jacob…
 
                                  those who are physically of Israel, lack the faith of Abraham…
                                                                ("Esau/Edom, and the Trail of the Serpent - III", n. d., p. 7)[34]

Here is one
mystery of Mystery Babylon potentially solved: corruption in the human race could be - and is -
everywhere; even in the people whose bloodline was of the “promise” seed of Adam, Noah, and Abraham!
No one is immune to either physical or
spiritual corruption; and the wrong people will even work to corrupt
those who even try to understand or administer the ways of God! That's why God truly
hates some people -
it is because they try to corrupt His Word.
As least Cain, Cush, Nimrod, and Semiramis were
open about their beliefs; they were open about their
intentions. The detestable ones, according to God, were the hypocrites
- those who claim to be Godly, but,
in reality, possess a very dark underbelly.

From this, a new battle was about to ensue: there would be people who were
viewed as if they followed the
ways of God, but, in fact, they would
twist or pervert the processes of grace and faith; as well as lead
everyone around them towards the “other side”
- all for their own, selfish benefit.
This is corruption “at its core;” hypocrisy at its most lethal
; a good reason why God would “hate” those
who - physically and
philosophically - came from this side of the Serpent!

Some people, such as Esau, might not
physically be of the evil one, but philosophically, their theologies
are - that makes them just as bad. This is what one ancient accounts means when it says that Esau and
Jacob were like “good wine mixed with bad.”[35]

                            Their deeds identified with them with their father Cain, not Abraham.
                                                                 ("Esau/Edom, and the Trail of the Serpent - III", n. d., p. 7)[36]

As many of us know,

                                                          ...every tree is known by its own fruit.
                                                                                           - Luke 6:44 (KJV)

These people might sound like they preach something “holy;” their words might sound like they are
close
to God; but they, in reality, do and feel the opposite.

Nature Vs. Nurture

It’s easy to assume that the most important element of a person’s life is their freewill, at least regarding the
utilization of God’s processes of grace and faith - and not their pride. What goes on inside someone’s head
is behind a lot of the
mysteries of these ancient patriarchs. His choices could “make” or “break” him, as
well as others.
God had some more powerful words for the would-be hypocrite Esau, and his generation.

  "(God speaking) ...I have made Esau bare, I have uncovered his secret places, and he shall not be able
                     to hide himself: his seed is spoiled, and his brethren, and his neighbours…"
                                                                                                - Jer. 49:10 (KJV)

God would eventually take out His judgment against Esau, and his kind, because Esau’s philosophies
would spoil, not only the seed which came from him, but many around.

Again, what
secrets or mysteries of Esau's soul would he try to hide from those around him, as well as from
God Himself? What would make God want to punish
him, his physical descendants, as well as those like him
(in “
spirit”)?
Jacob, and others who followed the ways of God, already knew:

            …(we are to)… contemplate not those things which are seen, but those which are not seen…
 
                                      not carnal but spiritual things, not present but future things.
                                                                       - Origen Homilies on Genesis and Exodus, p. 179[37]

It seems that God, and His ways, were on their own way toward being infiltrated with these pagan tenants
of old, as well as
new, self-serving "ways"; both striving to lure people into concentrating only on the carnal,
temporal, or earthly elements of our own existence.

Earthly and Godly - The New Combination

As we're beginning to see, the “gavel” of these early pre-flood patriarchs were about to pass on - on
either extreme. We'll, not only, have
pagan patriarchs (such as Nimrod) passing their practices on, the
followers of God needed to pass their craft onward, too. On top of it, we
now have those who would
infiltrate the ways of God, starting their own, new “way,” and passing that on!
Let’s see some of the ways
Esau would manifest the ways of the Serpent, and elements of paganism, into
once, purely God-following communities.

The "Heel"

Esau would reflect all of this "change" - this new corruption - in elements of his own life. He would reek of
these attributes, inside and out. He would also be in the perfect position
- as the brother of Israel himself -
to do damage, and launch these corrupted atrocities against God at the core; and distribute it to his
descendants and other people around them.

We begin to see these “reflections” of Esau with a famous story in the Bible; a story that takes place all the
way back to his birth. Many of us know that Jacob grabbed Esau’s
heel as he was coming out of the womb.
As a matter of fact, this “grabbing of the heel” by Jacob helped his parents give him his name:

                                 And after that came his brother, and his hand took hold of Esau's
                                                 heel, therefore they called his name Jacob.
                                                                                        - Book of Jasher 26:15[38]

It seemed that, in the past, the circumstances of one’s
birth allowed a parent some substance to give the
baby a name; and the name
Esau might have proved significant to his life, later on (as well as the term heel).

It is written, "And after that came out his brother, and his hand took hold of Esau's heel"… What is meant
by Esau's heel? Do you really believe that his hand was grasping the other's leg? Not so. His hand was
grasping someone who
is a heel… Esau is known as the heel. From the time that Jacob followed him…
(God) called him 'heel', as Esau is of the aspect of the Serpent, as it is written concerning him, "it shall
bruise your head, and you shall bruise his heel"…  meaning you who are called 'heel' will bite first and in
the end he will bruise your head. Who is his head? It is Samael, the head of the serpent that strikes in this
world…
                                                                                           - Zohar 20 Mishpatim 3[39]

In a spiritual way, this “heel” could easily become a symbol of the ideology Esau was about to help produce
;
corrupted ways that will contradict - even “
bite” (i.e. strike out against) - anyone trying to faithfully follow the
correct ways of God. A
heel, interestingly enough, could also be looked upon in this negative way:

                       …it’s the dull and ugly work that cultivates the lowest turf, dragging down the
                                                     awareness of G-d (God) to the lowest plane…
                                                                                    ("Heads or Heels", n. d., p. 2)[40]

It does all make total sense, in regards to Esau, and the direction this "heel" was about to take people (as
we’ll soon see). There is more.

Red, Blood, and Earthly

As stated, there would be these "reflections" - even outer, physical significances - of Esau that would make
him stand out; all the way back to his time of birth.

                                                                   And the first came forth ruddy…
                                                                                              - Gen. 25:25 (KJV)

What this probably meant was that Esau came out of the womb with an extremely blood-red, or
rosy,
appearance; much like he had a lot of blushing going on under his skin. This blood would also go on to
become a sign of what would go on in his future
- something extremely negative, as we’ll see.

One tradition states that Esau even “sucked the mother’s blood before he was born.”[41] Esau, by his
antics, would “suck the life” out of his mother; and, most everyone around him. The stigma of this color
would stick with him throughout the rest of his life.

                                       …his "red"… color indicated his bloodthirsty propensities…
                                                                                         ("Esau", n. d., p. 10)[42]

                                     …he was blood-red, a sign of his future sanguinary nature.
                                                                                         (Ginzberg, 1909, p. 315)[43]

The word
sanguinary signifies someone who is “eager to shed blood full of or characterized by bloodshed;
bloody.” All of this, as one might guess, will be a part of Esau's life, soon enough.

Hairy as an Old Man

Adam, as we know, was also thought to be ruddy, or rosy cheeked; it was easy for him to blush. Because of
this, Adam became associated with the
earth - because God fashioned him directly from the earth. Esau was
also connected with the earth, but, for a different reason. In his case, the words
red and earth had other
meanings:

           …(as far as the words)… red or… “earthly”… his name appears to mean “something made.”
                                                                              - Origen Homilies on Genesis and Exodus, p. 181[44]

Apparently, Esau came out of the womb “already made” or fashioned. Now, what would this mean?

                   The older was called Esau, because he was… fully developed when he was born…
                                                                                (Ginzberg, 1909, p. 315)[45]

… meaning he look more like a typical
adult would - much more “grown up” than a typical baby; even
a small child. As we recall,

                                           ...the first came forth ruddy, all over like a hairy mantle;
                                                                and they called his name Esau.
                                                                                             - Gen. 25:25 (KJV)

He simply had a lot of hair to him, as an older man. When many think of an extremely
hairy individual, what
kind of individual
character might come to one's mind?

…they named him Esau. - The etymology of the name… is unclear… The Hebrew wording suggests that
he was completely developed… perfect, robust. In addition, it hints at Esau’s wild and unrefined nature…

                                                   ("What is the Meaning of the Names Esau and Jacob", n. d., p. 1)[46]

That leads us to a greater understanding of him.

"Harshly" Born

One term used to describe Esau’s character was that he was a “harsh” individual. This “manly” appearance
may have laid clues to this other characteristic; as well as give us even
more clues to Esau’s future! There
are a number of words associated with this word “harsh.” By the end of this story, we'll see how all of this
was related to his hairy, adult-like appearance at birth:

-
having an unpleasant or harmful effect because of great strength or force: too intense or powerful
- severe or cruel: not kind
- rough or unpleasant to the touch
-
bitter, brutal, hardhanded, murderous, rugged
-
lacking in aesthetic appeal or refinement[47]

…all of these definitive signs of Esau’s nature
to come; as well those who followed him!

                                                                                     - - -

For more information on the above section, please browse our selection of
Mystery Babylon books (especially
The Rise of Mystery Babylon - The Tower of Babel (Part 2)”!
                                                                                                      Footnotes

[1]  
Origen: Homilies on Genesis and Exodus, trans. Ronald E. Heine (Washington, D. C.: The Catholic University of America Press, 1981),
176.
[2]  Howard Schwartz,
Tree of Souls: The Mythology of Judaism (Oxford: University Press, 2004), 350.
[3]  S. Baring-Gould,
Legends of the Patriarchs and Prophets and Other Old Testament Characters (New York: American Book Exchange,
1881), 217.
[4]  
Origen: Homilies on Genesis and Exodus, trans. Ronald E. Heine (Washington, D. C.: The Catholic University of America Press, 1981),
179.
[5]  Louis Ginzberg,
The Legends of the Jews Volume I: From the Creation to Jacob, trans. Henrietta Szold (Baltimore, Maryland: The
Johns Hopkins University Press, 1909), 313.
[6]  Louis Ginzberg,
The Legends of the Jews Volume I: From the Creation to Jacob, trans. Henrietta Szold (Baltimore, Maryland: The
Johns Hopkins University Press, 1909), 314.
[7]  S. Baring-Gould,
Legends of the Patriarchs and Prophets and Other Old Testament Characters (New York: American Book Exchange,
1881), 217.
[8]  
St. Ephrem the Syrian: Selected Prose Works, Section 23, 1, trans. Edward G. Mathews, Jr. and Joseph P. Amar (Washington, D. C.:
The Catholic University of America Press, 1994), 171.
[9]  S. Baring-Gould,
Legends of the Patriarchs and Prophets and Other Old Testament Characters (New York: American Book Exchange,
1881), 217.
[10]  Louis Ginzberg,
The Legends of the Jews Volume I: From the Creation to Jacob, trans. Henrietta Szold (Baltimore, Maryland: The
Johns Hopkins University Press, 1909), 314.
[11]  J Allen,
Judah’s Sceptre, 15, http://www.giveshare.org/israel/judah/ (accessed Feb. 22, 2011).
[12]  
St. Ephrem the Syrian: Selected Prose Works, Section 23, 1, trans. Edward G. Mathews, Jr. and Joseph P. Amar (Washington, D. C.:
The Catholic University of America Press, 1994), 171.
[13]  Louis Ginzberg,
The Legends of the Jews Volume I: From the Creation to Jacob, trans. Henrietta Szold (Baltimore, Maryland: The
Johns Hopkins University Press, 1909), 314.
[14]  Jewish Encyclopedia,
Esau, 1, http://www.jewishencyclopedia.com/articles/5846-esau (accessed March 22, 2011).
[15]  Louis Ginzberg,
The Legends of the Jews Volume I: From the Creation to Jacob, trans. Henrietta Szold (Baltimore, Maryland: The
Johns Hopkins University Press, 1909), 313.
[16]  Easton’s Bible Dictionary,
Birthright, 2, http://www.bible-history.com/eastons/B/Birthright (accessed Dec. 2, 2015).
[17]  J. H.,
The Mysterious and Prophetic History of Esau Considered: In Connection With the Numerous Prophecies Concerning Edom
(1837)
(London: J. G. & F. Rivington, 1837), 61.
[18]  Easton’s Bible Dictionary,
Birthright, 2, http://www.bible-history.com/eastons/B/Birthright, Dec. 2, 2015.
[19]  Louis Ginzberg,
The Legends of the Jews Volume V: Notes for Volume One and Two, 13, 22, trans. Henrietta Szold (Baltimore,
Maryland: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1909), 271, 273.
[20]  Howard Schwartz,
Tree of Souls: The Mythology of Judaism (Oxford: University Press, 2004), 350.
[21]  Louis Ginzberg,
The Legends of the Jews Volume I: From the Creation to Jacob, trans. Henrietta Szold (Baltimore, Maryland: The
Johns Hopkins University Press, 1909), 313-314.
[22]  Howard Schwartz,
Tree of Souls: The Mythology of Judaism (Oxford: University Press, 2004), 350?.
[23]  Louis Ginzberg,
The Legends of the Jews Volume I: From the Creation to Jacob, trans. Henrietta Szold (Baltimore, Maryland: The
Johns Hopkins University Press, 1909), 313.
[24]  
The Zohar, Volume 20, Mishpatim 3, https://www2.kabbalah.com/ (accessed Feb. 25, 2010).
[25]  
The Works of Philo Judaeus, On the Birth of Abel and the Sacrifices Offered By Him and By His Brother Cain, 39(135), trans. C. D.
Yonge (London: H. G. Bohn, 1854-5).
[26]  Louis Ginzberg,
The Legends of the Jews Volume I: From the Creation to Jacob, trans. Henrietta Szold (Baltimore, Maryland: The
Johns Hopkins University Press, 1909), 313.
[27]  Johann Andreas Eisenmenger,
The Traditions of the Jews, Contained in the Talmud and Other Mystical Writings (London: J.
Robinson, 1748), 191, 207;
The Zohar, Volume 43, Balak 20, https://www2.kabbalah.com/ (accessed Feb. 25, 2010); The Zohar,
Volume 22, Terumah 68, https://www2.kabbalah.com/ (accessed Feb. 25, 2010);
The Zohar, Volume 34, Emor 34, https://
www2.kabbalah.com/ (accessed Feb. 25, 2010).
[28]  Daniel Parker,
Treatise on the Two Seeds, 11, http://www.particularbaptistlibrary.org/LIBRARY/Theology/Treaties%20on%20the
%20Two%20Seeds%20-%20Parker.pdf (accessed April 1, 2011).
[29]  
The Zohar, Volume 43, Balak 17, https://www2.kabbalah.com/ (accessed Feb. 25, 2010).
[30]  Daniel Parker,
Treatise on the Two Seeds, 30, http://www.particularbaptistlibrary.org/LIBRARY/Theology/Treaties%20on%20the
%20Two%20Seeds%20-%20Parker.pdf (accessed April 1, 2011).
[31]  
The Babylonian Talmud, Nedarim 31a, http://www.halakhah.com/nedarim/nedarim_31.html (accessed Dec. 2, 2015).
[32]  Daniel Parker,
Treatise on the Two Seeds, 31, http://www.particularbaptistlibrary.org/LIBRARY/Theology/Treaties%20on%20the
%20Two%20Seeds%20-%20Parker.pdf (accessed April 1, 2011).
[33]  Daniel Parker,
Treatise on the Two Seeds, 31, http://www.particularbaptistlibrary.org/LIBRARY/Theology/Treaties%20on%20the
%20Two%20Seeds%20-%20Parker.pdf (accessed April 1, 2011).
[34]  
Esau/Edom, and the Trail of the Serpent - III, 7, http://biblebelievers.org.au/bb980923.htm (accessed July 8, 2000 287).
[35]  
The Zohar, Bereshith 36b-37a 136b.
[36]  
Esau/Edom, and the Trail of the Serpent - III, 7, http://biblebelievers.org.au/bb980923.htm (accessed July 8, 2000 287).
[37]  
Origen: Homilies on Genesis and Exodus, , trans. Ronald E. Heine (Washington, D. C.: The Catholic University of America Press,
1981), 179.
[38]  
The Book of Jasher, 26:15, trans. Albinus Alcuin (Pomeroy, Washington: Health Research, 1966), .
[39]  
The Zohar, Volume 20, Mishpatim 3, https://www2.kabbalah.com/ (accessed Feb. 25, 2010).
[40]  Chabad.org,
Heads or Heels, n. d., 2, http://www.chabad.org/parshah/article_cdo/aid/1241660/jewish/Heads-or-Heels.htm
(accessed  Dec. 7, 2015).
[41]  S. Baring-Gould,
Legends of the Patriarchs and Prophets and Other Old Testament Characters (New York: American Book
Exchange, 1881), 217.
[42]  Jewish Encyclopedia,
Esau, n. d., 4, http://www.jewishencyclopedia.com/articles/5846-esau (accessed March 22, 2011).
[43]  Louis Ginzberg,
The Legends of the Jews Volume I: From the Creation to Jacob, trans. Henrietta Szold (Baltimore, Maryland: The
Johns Hopkins University Press, 1909), 315.
[44]  
Origen: Homilies on Genesis and Exodus, trans. Ronald E. Heine (Washington, D. C.: The Catholic University of America Press,
1981), 181.
[45]  Louis Ginzberg,
The Legends of the Jews Volume I: From the Creation to Jacob, trans. Henrietta Szold (Baltimore, Maryland: The
Johns Hopkins University Press, 1909), 315.
[46]  Michael Leo Samuel,
What is the Meaning of the Names Esau and Jacob, n. d., 1, http://rabbimichaelsamuel.com/2009/11/what-is-
the-meaning-of-the-names-esau-and-jacob/ (accessed Nov. 25, 2015).
[47]  Merriam-Webster,
harsh, n. d., 1-2, merriam-webster.com/dictionary/harsh (accessed Dec. 4, 2015).